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The Weakest Home | Domestic Violence | Spoken Word

One of the biggest issues facing families today is domestic violence. Whether it be against the wife, husband or children - we can all play a part in bringin...
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You MUST see at least the first 4 min of this: Sarah Kay: If I should have a daughter ... | Video on TED.com

 

Sarah Kay will be at the Ruffing Montessori School, in Cleveland Hieghts, OH on October 11, 2012 at 7:00pm. 

 

My recommendation: Sarah was a featured speaker at the Annual Conference of the National Association of Independent schools in 2011 and received satnding ovations. Her performance of spoken word poetry was riveting.  She cast a spell over the room and held an audience of over 3,000 hearts in the palms of her hands--and went she released us----we were in tears-- standing on higher gound. 

 

 

TED Talks "If I should have a daughter, instead of Mom, she's gonna call me Point B ... " began spoken word poet Sarah Kay, in a talk that inspired two standing ovations at TED2011.


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The Black Bruins [Spoken Word] - Sy Stokes UCLA criticizes the university for its lack of black male students, who make up less than 4%

SIGN THIS PETITION BELOW TO MAKE A CHANGE!!! https://www.change.org/petitions/ucla-has-less-than-50-black-males-in-the-entire-freshmen-class-this-needs-to-ch...

 

Student at the University of California at Los Angeles criticizes the university for its lack of black male students, who make up less than 4% of the student populationSy Stokes, uses spoken word poetry to reveal enrolment numbers, including that only 48 of the 2,418 entering male students this year are black


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Priscilla - TDUBARIQ.COM

Priscilla - TDUBARIQ.COM | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
"touch me with your spirit, kiss me with your dedication" #Poetry - Priscilla : http://t.co/NcVH8n7I2Y @TDUBARIQ
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A Single Summer Verse

A Single Summer Verse | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
The soft breezes of summer, Caress me with fond memories of summers past, And the promise of more to come. Winter is forgotten in the moment. (A poem.
One single verse,
Writing short poetry -
Must be my curse!
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Crafty Green Poet: No Worries Whale - a book of ocean poems

Crafty Green Poet: No Worries Whale - a book of ocean poems | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
RT @craftygreenpoet: Protecting the oceans through poetry! I review @NoWorriesWhale http://t.co/7G2yfelP3p
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Anne Cady's art is visual poetry - The Eagle

Anne Cady's art is visual poetry - The Eagle | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Anne Cady's art is visual poetry
The Eagle
Anne Cady's art is visual poetry. New Haven artist Anne Cady is getting a lot of attention these days.
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The Top 5 Spoken Word Poets - Sabotage Times

The Top 5 Spoken Word Poets - Sabotage Times | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Like most who dabble with the dirty, pretentious circle-jerk that is modern poetry, I am a raging narcissist, completely unable to fathom or grasp the concept that anyone could be compared to anyone else.
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10 Poems Everyone Needs to Read

10 Poems Everyone Needs to Read | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Today is National Poetry Day, and we gently suggest that you celebrate by reading a poem or two. Not sure which poem to go for? Well, for those that skipped freshman English, or were too busy stari...
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ImperfectlyPerfect

ImperfectlyPerfect | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
visual-poetry:
“ by timm ulrichs (+)
[via]
” (Photo: visual-poetry: by timm ulrichs (+) [via] http://t.co/ztyuEdxjMb)
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economic words

economic words | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
RT @AnonymeZeichner: "time is a line lined with lines." Visual poetry by Anke Becker
http://t.co/OgAQKEN3Eq http://t.co/tbn7K62pmd
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10 Everyday Phrases That Originated From Poetry

10 Everyday Phrases That Originated From Poetry | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
By Max Minckler for Riffle: Think poetry has nothing to do with you?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Lynnette Van Dyke
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:33 PM

I can't help but wonder how many of these "everyday phrases" actually are still everyday phrases. That is, are they too just something "old people" say? 

 

"Chickens coming home to roost"?

"Method to his madness"?

"Bite the dust"?

 

Really? Are these stiil everyday phrases? 

 

To be clear, I'm not suggesting that these phrases are not phrases that today's students can learn and come to understand. I'm simply suggesting that if the point is that they might be interesting to students because they ARE everyday phrases, as in they hear them frequently, and therefore might be potential engagement bridges between their own lives and the classics from which they originated, that this might not be a valid conclusion to draw or rely upon when designing an engaging learning experience for many 21st century learners.

 

I kind of felt a similar question when I first showed West Side Story to my students a few decades ago. When it came out it was a modern day adaptation of Romeo and Juliet. And, supposedly generated engaged traction with young people who were young THEN. But, that bridge is pretty aged now. 

 

Don't get me wrong, there are still fans of West Side Story, even among today's youth. But, for many the fact that it is a modern day adaptation just doesn't hold. Gangsters wearing neckties?

 

That's funnier than it is bridging for many.

 

There is a surge of modern day Shakespeare (and other classic literature) adaptations coming from Hollywood today. They may well be perceived and thus more welcomed as "modern day" bridges to the classics. And, they will succeed in ways that West Side Story succeeded when it actually looked at least a little bit like what Hollywood teenagers looked like to teenage audiences in 1961. Teen age audiences in 2013 are not seeing a Hollywood version of contemporary teens in West Side Story.

 

And, I'm all for recognizing that best practices change or evolve in order to create more successful connections for students and educators of the day. The Leonardo DiCaprio version of Romeo and Juliet, though clearly "Hollywoodized" had a much closer similarity to its contemporary teen audiences in 1996.

 

But, that very recognition is also at the heart of my realization that best practices, like #1 songs, fads, fashions, box office blockbuster movies, like video games, like so much that we know can move massive numbers of people to engage enthusiastically in that particular area of interest, has a shelf life. 

 

Remember Gangham Style? CDs? Neighborhood video rental stores?

 

Connecting to the contemporary is a great practice while that connection is in fact contemporary.

 

Some things never quite die, but their attractiveness as a means of generating engaging "contemporary" connections begins to fade for at least a very large proportion of those who once were captivated by those contemporary connections. And, I'd suggest that we amplify the problem by also considering those students who really are too young to have ever been a contemporary beneficiary of the powerful connections as likely to "appreciate the contemporary connections" for resources that never were contemporary in their own lifetimes.

 

Perhaps the shelf life of contemporary connectivity ought to be considered.  And, best practice regarding the use of "aging" resources, might require the moving those resources from the required learning experience shelf to the optional learning experience shelf.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 "Google Lit Trips" is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

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What Makes Poetry Bad Makes Content Writing Good

What Makes Poetry Bad Makes Content Writing Good | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
While both forms of writing require different strategies, there are some things about writing that are just universally true.

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Spoken-Word Poets Bring Words to Life for Students

Spoken-Word Poets Bring Words to Life for Students | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it

By Alyssa Morones

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Greeks recited epic poems aloud. Actors have breathed life into Shakespeare’s soliloquies since the 16th century. Now, a pair of poet-educators are working to bring the rich art of spoken-word poetry to students from kindergarten to graduate school.

“The powerful and important thing about spoken word is, it doesn’t matter what the words look like on paper,” said Sarah Kay, a poet and the founder of a nonprofit organization that brings spoken-word poetry to schools. “It’s about what it sounds like when you say it out loud.”

While poetry long has been a staple of K-12 English classes, spoken-word poetry, an art form that extends from the beat poetry of the 1950s to contemporary rap, is less commonly taught. ButMs. Kay and other educators who have worked with her organization believe that kind of poetry may be especially well-suited to connecting with young people at an emotional level, making traditional poetry more accessible to students, and sharpening their critical-thinking skills.

“It inspires them to actually start putting pen to paper. If their curriculum is not inspiring them, something like this can,” said Ruben Zamora, a Sunnyvale, Calif., school librarian and poetry adviser who invited Ms. Kay’s organization, Project VOICE, for Vocal Outreach Into Creative Expression, to perform at his school.

Ms. Kay conceived the idea for the project in 2004 as a way to share the art of spoken-word poetry with students in her high school, the United Nations International School in New York, and revived it in 2007 with the help of her friend Phil Kaye, a fellow spoken-word poet, while both were at Brown University. Together, the young poets expanded the program to tour schools across the country and around the world, including the United Kingdom, Singapore, and South Africa.

Their mission? To entertain, educate, and inspire.

Creative Process

They begin each of their school visits with a show, introducing students to their art form with an original spoken-word performance.

SEE ALSOWatch spoken-word performances from Sarah Kay, Phil Kaye and others.

“A lot of students have never seen spoken-word performed,” said Ms. Kay. “What we try to do with each performance is show them how many different options of the art form there are.”

Then, in workshops of about 25 students each, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye try to build on the school’s existing curricula and help students create and perform their own spoken-word poems.

One of the first two schools where they performed was Mr. Zamora’s. They visited Fremont High School, in Sunnyvale, in 2009 at his request.

“Through the workshop process, students write and create ideas,” he said. “They form a poem and then share it and they produce some really good stuff.”

Project VOICE returned to Fremont in 2010, 2011, and 2012, and the school is hoping to bring the poets back next school year.

Fremont senior Sioeli Kaho was a freshman when he first saw a voice performance at his school.

“I remember walking into the room kind of skeptical, thinking how I’m not a big poetry guy,” said Mr. Kaho. “But, watching them, I was like, wow, this is actually really interesting.”

He’s been a member of Fremont’s spoken-word club ever since.

According to Mr. Zamora, attendance at the open-microphone events held by Fremont’s spoken-word club has more than doubled since the voice workshops.

“Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye catapulted that whole culture on our campus,” Mr. Zamora said.

He noted that a handful of teachers at Fremont now incorporate spoken-word in their classrooms, giving students several creative options in place of a standard report. Those include multimedia reports and essays, songs, or spoken-word poems.

“These options all still meet the teacher’s rubric and criteria, but now students have the freedom to be more creative,” said Mr. Zamora.

Tool for Common Core

Project VOICE’s approach to poetry may be timely as schools in most states move to teach the Common Core State Standards and in keeping with the new standards’ focus on text complexity, said Eileen Murphy, a member of the National Council of Teachers of English.

Spoken-word poets Phil Kaye and Sarah Kay, above, co-direct Project VOICE, an organization that brings spoken-word poetry workshops and performances to schools across the United States and around the world. The art form encompasses verses that were created to be recited out loud, such as beat poetry, rather than read on paper.—Melanie Burford/Prime for Education Week

“Poetry is in a unique position to offer teachers a complex, and many times brief, text when time is a sparse resource,” said Ms. Murphy, the founder and CEO of ThinkCERCA, which stands for Claim, Evidence, Reason, Counterargument, and Audience, located in Chicago, which aims to help teachers encourage critical thinking in their students.

The emphasis on having students create their own works in teaching spoken-word poetry adds a deeper educational dimension to the lessons, according to James Catterall, a professor emeritus at the graduate school of education and information studies at the University of California, Los Angeles, who specializes in arts and human development. “Teaching poetry and teaching art are different things,” he said. Teaching poetry is “the teacher pouring content into the kids. [Creating spoken-word] is more than just memorizing or understanding. It’s asking kids to think critically.”

While there hasn’t been much research on the learning benefits of teaching spoken-word poetry, Mr. Catterall said, “working out expressions in an art form is bound to boost cognitive development and [students’] ways of thinking and their approach to problems.”

Engaging Students

Another spoken-word educator is Peter Kahn, who taught it for nine years at Oak Park/River Forest High School in Oak Park, Ill. He recently left to launch a spoken-word education training program for teachers at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

He said the medium can have a transformative effect on students.

“It improves students as readers and writers, their critical thinking and analysis, their self-confidence, their literacy skills,” he said.

In his years as a spoken-word educator, Mr. Kahn found that students who were otherwise disengaged because of problems outside the classroom benefited the most.

“If you’re scared, you can’t take in new information,” he said. “Spoken-word allows kids to get those problems down on the page, to share them verbally, and to get rid of that background noise.”

Fremont student Sioeli Kaho concurred: “Spoken word gives me a way to act out and say how I feel and talk about anything that bothers me. It’s a way to let out a little steam.”

Diane Luby Lane, who started the Get Lit-Words Ignite spoken-word-poetry program in Los Angeles, found the same to be true. Many of the students she works with are at risk of dropping out of school or, if not, are still dealing with major problems in their lives.

“They’re supported in turning their stories into art. It affects their whole relationship with school and learning.

Because students typically get little exposure to spoken-word poetry, Ms. Kay said she and her colleagues have found that students are often “hungry for it” once they get a taste. “We know not every school has the means to have a big arts program, but that shouldn’t stop students from having access. That’s one of the things we’re working on.”

Project VOICE is funded through grants and from the fees charged to schools for each visit. The charges are determined by how much time the poets spend at the school. Mr. Kaye and Ms. Kay hope to raise enough money during the coming year to subsidize schools that wouldn’t otherwise be able to fit the program into their budgets.

Before the teaching artists leave a school, Project VOICE helps them continue to boost the spoken-word presence on their campuses. That includes everything from providing them with information on resources in their area to helping set up spoken-word poetry clubs.

Expanding Horizons

Another way the art form is spreading is through technology. “Even 10 years ago, spoken-word was hard to find unless you lived in a city,” said Mr. Kaye.

Now, sites like YouTube give students the opportunity to see a variety of poets and performances from all over the world. Several YouTube channels are dedicated solely to spoken-word, including Speakeasynyc, which features performances from poets across the nation.

In an effort to expand Project VOICE, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye recently hired a new poet to join their team and hope to gradually add more. In the meantime, Ms. Kay and Mr. Kaye are working on developing a text version of their curriculum, so that schools and teachers will have a solid foundation to build on after their visit.

Said Mr. Kaye: “We’re trying to create a structure that lets our visit be as long-lasting and impactful and meaningful as possible.”

 


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Chilled Minstrel Hastilude - Royal Poetry Slam

Uploaded by mediamentor on Mar 26, 2012

WHAT: Chilled Minstrel Hastilude - Royal Poetry Slam
WHEN: Wednesday, March 21, 2012 8:00pm until 11:00pm
WHERE: Snow Castle, Snow Kingdom, Denendeh

Cheer the limerick paladins as they joust for the envied title of His Gelid Majesty's Popsicle Laureate.
Followed by a music and spoken-word jam.
March 21st is World Poetry Day. Come celebrate at the SnowCastle and cheer poets Max Power, The Gold Ranger, Miranda Currie, The Avalanche Kid, Jacqu Brass, Ryan Dempster, Cat Colas and and The Bruce Dickenson as they joust for the envied title of His Gelid Majesty's Popsicle Laureate.

Batiste Foisy, Organiser


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[174] Power of Spoken Word Poetry, and Millions Strong Against Monsanto

Abby Martin Breaks the Set on the Power of Spoken Word Poetry, the Worldwide March against Monsanto, and the Anniversary of the Gaza Flotilla Siege LIKE Brea...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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life hurts, stay strong, closetcaselesbian: closetcaselesbian: Slam...

closetcaselesbian:
“ closetcaselesbian:
“ Slam Poetry- A man with OCD talks about the woman he fell in love with and lost. Video here, you must watch it.

This is still my favorite.
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Watch This Guy Misspell 'Father' At A Spelling Bee For A Beautiful Reason

Watch This Guy Misspell 'Father' At A Spelling Bee For A Beautiful Reason | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Six letters of note.
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Poetry in motion - Sydney Morning Herald

Poetry in motion - Sydney Morning Herald | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Poetry in motion
Sydney Morning Herald
Scott, 41, first tested her performance and poetry skills (to this day she considers herself first and foremost a writer) in the 1990s, reciting her work in the clubs of north Philadelphia.
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Inspiration, an original poem by PoetryGrrrl | Poetry Grrrl

Inspiration, an original poem by PoetryGrrrl | Poetry Grrrl | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Inspiration's sweetest smile looked down on me today; she sent a ray of shining love so bright it chased my gloom away a boy so sweet and wonderful to make (Inspiration, an original poem by PoetryGrrrl http://t.co/w0GG21EKNJ...
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alexelle.com

alexelle.com | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
24. Lioness. Maryland.
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Why Poetry Makes Sense: An Interview With Stephen Burt

Why Poetry Makes Sense: An Interview With Stephen Burt | Modern Poetry | Scoop.it
Stephen Burt and I discussed the instructive and useful nature of poetry: how it's a vehicle for self-expression, a valuable means of understanding the world and a resource that is written for an infinite set of audiences.

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Sunflower Foundation's curator insight, September 2, 2013 11:43 PM

This is so true. Kibera School for Girls, established by Shining Hope for Communities uses poetry and drama to teach. Our foundation awarded them a grant for drama resources last year. We are delighted that their enchanting little K-Gr.1 girls won first prize in the National Poetry Competition. In this case, poetry grounds not only learning but self esteem and communal pride.

Tara McIlroy's curator insight, October 14, 2013 5:35 PM

When we start to look for it, poetry is all around us, and never leaves us. Applications for learning and teaching are found here without needing to look very far.

 

Olivia Sica's curator insight, October 31, 2014 11:49 AM

I think things like poetry are a positive outlet for people who have emotions they don't know what to do with. If you're feeling overwhelmed, write it down! I can almost guarantee you'll feel better afterwords.