Argumentative Writing
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Common Core Practice | Sandy Beaches, Instagram Election Photos and Peter Rabbit #ccss #ccchat #edchat

Common Core Practice | Sandy Beaches, Instagram Election Photos and Peter Rabbit #ccss #ccchat #edchat | Argumentative Writing | Scoop.it
Our three tasks this week involve informational writing about beach replenishment, narrative writing about Election Day photographs and argumentative writing about classic books and the curriculum.

Via Darren Burris
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SCAN-We're Critical to Thinking: Simple Tools for Argumentative Writing #engchat #ccss #ccchat #edchat

SCAN-We're Critical to Thinking: Simple Tools for Argumentative Writing #engchat #ccss #ccchat #edchat | Argumentative Writing | Scoop.it
Blog: Using Tech for Argumentative Writing, finding and sharing evidence #ccss #amle #njed #edchat http://t.co/gJ3fctbw...

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Using Picture Books to Teach Argumentative Writing

Using Picture Books to Teach Argumentative Writing | Argumentative Writing | Scoop.it

So what's the difference between persuasive writing and argumentative writing? 

In persuasive writing, students passionately defend their point of view, relying upon opinion, personal experience, anecdotes, data, and examples. Argumentative writing, however, seeks to offer a more balanced approach, as it acknowledges points from the opposing view.


Via Deb Gardner
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Ted Caron's comment, March 12, 2013 10:41 AM
I wouldn't necessarily agree with the emphasis he places on the distinction between persuasive and argumentative pieces. He says that argumentative pieces acknowledge points from the opposing viewpoint whereas persuasive pieces only defend the author's own point of view. But persuasive pieces can also seek to refute counterpoints. Take, for example, the current IN middle school standards. The current middle school writing standards that relate to persuasive pieces call on students to "anticipate and address reader concerns and counterarguments." In my view, this is not necessarily the crux of what differentiates a persuasive and argumentative piece.

The biggest distinction, I believe, is something that he mentions but doesn't emphasize as strongly: A persuasive piece tends to focus on personal opinions, anecdotes and observations more than an argumentative should. Arguments, in contrast, are designed to draw upon evidence, facts and logic as a way to support a contention.

Just my thoughts.
Deb Gardner's comment, March 12, 2013 11:36 AM
Good point. Thanks for the helpful clarification!
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Writing: Lesson Plans for Argumentative Writing

Writing: Lesson Plans for Argumentative Writing | Argumentative Writing | Scoop.it

In the Trenches: Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans

Eye On Education

 

The Common Core State Standards ask teachers to shift from teaching persuasion to teaching argument. Unlike persuasion, argumentation relies more on claims and evidence and less on emotional appeals.


Via Mel Riddile
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