Are Learners More Capable Through the Traditional or Montessori Teaching Method
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The effects of environment on children's executive function: a study of three private school

The effects of environment on children's executive function: a study of three private school | Are Learners More Capable Through the Traditional or Montessori Teaching Method | Scoop.it
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Janet Bagby and others decided to examine three types of schools. They were Montessori, Catholic and Classical types. They were rating the executive functions of the children. Executive functions are things that guide your cognitive functions as well as your emotional ones. There are three processes, working memory, shift and inhibition. having good executive functions could lead to doing well in school. You could be organized, hold a lot of information or be creative. They took fourth to sixth graders in these three different schools and asked parents and teachers to grade the kids executive functions on a form that they were given. It showed that parents rated their children higher than the teachers did. The parents ratings from different schools appeared to be the same while the teachers scores differed. The teachers from Catholic and Montessori schools rated the students better than the  Classical school did. 

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World Book

The World Book web site offers an encyclopedia, dictionary, atlas, homework help, study aids, and curriculum guides. World Book is publisher of the World Book Encyclopedia.
Emma Himes's insight:

Douglas Sloan who has been a professor of education for over thirty years and who is also the author of 'Faith and Knowledge", which is a book about education and who impacted it, also contributes to World Book Encyclopedia. He wrote about the traditional school and what it was like when it was starting. The traditional schools focused on certain subjects such as history, arithmetic, reading, writing and grammar. While the teacher would talk, the students would copy everything into their notebook which they would later memorize and sometimes have to recite in front of the teacher and the class. The teacher would make everyone be quiet except when they had to recite the information that they memorized. The students sat in desks and only moved if they were instructed to. The teachers payed attention to the class as a whole, not the individual student.

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Sierra Serinese's comment, October 14, 2013 11:20 AM
It was really interesting to learn about the old way of teaching. The old ways of teaching covered all of the ways to drill a concept into a child's brain. Reading it out load can actually help if you are an auditory learner. It was definitely a lot stricter than schools now. You gave the gist of the article and it was great. You covered all the basics of the article and it was great. I didn't know they made kids go up to front and read their notes, that was a nice fun fact. Great job all around I liked it a lot.
Fiona Coffey's comment, October 14, 2013 11:14 PM
This article was very interesting. It shows how students used to be taught the material they needed to know. This form of teaching sounds like it put a great deal of pressure on the children. They would only have to copy down and memorize what the teachers said and having to recite it back to them in front of the class and teachers. This would lead to much room for error while kids tried to drill the information into their heads. You summarized the article really well and taught me something I didn't know before. You did a great job I really enjoyed it.
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A Brief History of Education

A Brief History of Education | Are Learners More Capable Through the Traditional or Montessori Teaching Method | Scoop.it
To understand schools we must view them in historical perspective.
Emma Himes's insight:

Peter Gray, a research professor at Boston College, who is also the author of several books about Psychology, wrote a article about the history of education. To begin to understand why children must go to school he felt we must know the history of how this started. In the beginning, children learned things by exploring and figuring things out for themselves. The rise of agriculture changed this and children were taught how to work in the field. Children had to learn how to be obedient. In the 16th century, it was encouraged for children to learn and certain religions began to also think that educating children was the right thing to do. In America during the 17th century, Massachusetts required to have children attend school to teach children how to be good Puritians. While the way we are taught is not as strict as it was back then, kids these days still have learned some of the important lessons that were taught back then.

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"Evaluating Montessori Education."

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Angeline Lillard evaluated social and academic aspects of Montessori education. The Montessori method is growing, over 5,000 schools in the US are using the program. First they gave five-year-old some from Montessori schools and others from traditional schools a simple test. They were given a test based on academics and another test where they were given different scenarios of things that might happen to them, and asked what they would do to solve the problem. Students from the Montessori school preformed higher on both these tests. When twelve year olds were given similar tests, all students were more equal academically than before, but the Montessori students preformed better socially. They had a stronger sense of community than the other schools did. Montessori is structured differently than Traditional and helps academic and social skills grow to be equal or better than other teaching methods.

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Summer O'Sullivan's comment, October 14, 2013 11:54 AM
Wow Emma. This scoop is really eye opening. Since tests and homework are absent from the Montessori education, and students still perform just as well academically as students of a traditional education, it leads me to question the importance of homework and tests. Many students believe these just cause more stress, so it is surprising to find that in a teaching style that does not have tests and homework, the students are still academically excellent. Also, Montessori students are better socially because of their interaction with students in the classroom. This is pretty amazing, and hints that perhaps Montessori education is the best for students in the 21st century,
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Comparison of Academic Achievement Between Montessori and Traditional Education Programs

Emma Himes's insight:
Christopher Lopata, an assistant professor in counseling, school and educational pyschology, Kristin V. Finn an assistant professor of education and Nancy V. Wallace tested and compared the academic achievements of children in Montessori and Traditional schools. Montessori education was founded by a women Maria Montessori in 1907 for learning disabled kids. Montessori students learn at thier own pace and work with kids in a three year age range. Older kids help the younger kids to learn and understand better. Montessori schools do not use textbooks or give out homework. Christopher, Kristin and Nancy tested fourth and eighth graders from four different schools. Their hypothesis was that Montessori students would preform better. They concluded that there was no major difference in test scores and Montessori kids did not outpreform the other schools. They agree that while the Montessori method is unique and good both socially and academically it does not outpreform other schools too much academically. 
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