Being an Architect
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Architectural Record Building Types Study | Floral Street Bridge

Architectural Record Building Types Study | Floral Street Bridge | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
Architecture news, architectural design, interviews, building projects, green architecture, digital architecture and building products from the leading magazine for architects and architecture professionals.
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

This article tells us about small bridge in London that stretches over "an unassuming street in London’s Covent Garden..." The bridge is interesting becuase it connects two important buildings, the Royal Ballet School, and the Royal Opera House. As the author points out, the bridge gives Floral Street it's own identity, a landmark that makes Floral Street, an otherwise unimportant street, have some kind of recognition and value.

An interesting fact about the Floral Street Bridge is that the two openings in the buildings aren't alligned, which gave the architects some issues. They evenutally agreed upon a design that would twist a quarter turn from one end of the street to the other. As we learn from the article, the bridge is " a deceptively simple, yet immediately legible design. An aluminum spine beam supports a timber deck and a series of square aluminum hoops. Between the openings, each hoop rotates 4 degrees relative to its neighbor and shifts in plan to accommodate the skewed alignment of the facade openings."

This bridge is fascinating  because of it's simple yet effective design.

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Cornell / Architecture / Programs of Study

Cornell / Architecture / Programs of Study | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
Programs of study for the Cornell university Department of Architecture
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

The Cornell Department of Architecture is widely considered to be one of, if not the, best colleges for architecture in United States. With only 275 students in the Department of Architecture, there is much hands-on learning. In addition, many courses allow students to create real world projects, etc. 

The Cornell Department of Architecture has been ranked the second best architecture school in the nation, just after Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The rigorous department is combined with the Arts and Planning Departments to be called the AAP.

One of the reasons for Cornell Architecture's success is it's inclusion of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. What's more, students can receive degrees in Architectural History, something that is rarely offered at other schools. 

In addition, Cornell Architecture has many Special Programs, including Summer and Foreign Exchange programs. Finally, Cornell Architecture has campuses in New York City, as well as in Ithaca, New York. 

 

 

 

 

 

"Programs of Study." Aap.cornell.edu. Cornell University, 2013. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.

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Frederick Law Olmsted News - The New York Times

Frederick Law Olmsted News - The New York Times | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
News about Frederick Law Olmsted. Commentary and archival information about Frederick Law Olmsted from The New York Times.
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

This article is a biography of the architect Frederick Law Olmsted, and a short list of his most notable projects. Olmsted began his architectural career in the late 1850's, when he joined with the architect Calver Vaux to design a park in the middle of Manhattan. Their submission was eventually chosen, and the park, now known as Central Park, went on to become Olmsted's most famous project. 

After the Central Park project, Olmsted went on to design many more parks in institutions, cities, or on private property. Olmsted is widely considered to be one of the greatest architects and park planners of all time. 

Frederick Law Olmsted's stye widely revolves around the use of trees and other natural landscapes in urban environments, "The architecture of Europe impressed him, but trees were his true love."

As Olmsted gained more and more fame, the amount of possible work became steadie. As the article points out, Olmsted rarely had the chance to design things himself, without another agenda from the government or elsewhere. 

Frederick Law Olmsted will always be known as a great pioneer in the field of landscape architecture. His many hundreds of parks and buildings are still in existence to this day, a monument to his tremendous skill. 





Lezzard, Suzanna. "Frederick Law Olmsted." Nytimes.com. The New York Times, 13 Jan. 2013. Web. 13 Jan. 2013. 


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Funnel Cities And Towns On Feet? How To Live With The Visionary Architecture Of Walter Jonas And Archigram - Forbes

Funnel Cities And Towns On Feet? How To Live With The Visionary Architecture Of Walter Jonas And Archigram - Forbes | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
The best of these unbuilt buildings and undeveloped developments – some of which can currently be seen at Berlin's Hamburger Bahnhof – can have as much impact on society as concrete skyscrapers and cities, but by opposite means.
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

This article tells us about a proposal for a housing complex in 1970's West Germany. The plan was to stack houses in a circular, descending shape, very similar to the shape of a funnel. The intention was not only to save land, but to conserve the precious soil that lay under foot. The design, known as Intrapolis, never left the blueprint stage. As the author points out, architecture should be judged and valued by it's practicality, not it's outrageousness. "The Intrapolis captivates us precisely because it’s so bizarrely different from anything in our experience." Another example of crazy architecture is the so called Plug-In City, an idea created by a British architect in the 70's. The idea was that a person could lift up his or her pod using a crane, and transplant it anywhere they liked. 

In any case, I agree that architecture shouldn't be outlandish just to be new or exciting. Architecture, whatever kind, should be simplistic, and more importantly, practical. Architecture without any rhyme or reason is ineffective and sometimes comical. 




Keats, Jonathon. "Funnel Cities And Towns On Feet? How To Live With The Visionary Architecture Of Walter Jonas And Archigram." Forbes.com. Forbes, 27 Nov. 2012. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.


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Cass Gilbert Society - Cass Gilbert - the Architect - Works - Woolworth Building, New York, NY

Cass Gilbert Society - Cass Gilbert - the Architect - Works - Woolworth Building, New York, NY | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
Cass Gilbert Strong Functional American Architecture Cass Gilbert Buildings, Offices, Woolworth Building, New York, NY.
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

The Woolworth Building was one of the first skyscrapers in New York City. When completed in 1913, the building was not only the tallest in New York, but the tallest in the entire world. The Woolworth Building began as an office building, housing employees of F.W. Woolworth Company, a retailing company founded by Frank W. Woolworth. 

When the project began, Frank Woolworth wanted the building to be the tallest in the world. This request put pressure on the architect, Cass Gilbert, to make the building a practical and economical office building. 

The building's design resembles a Gothic church. The arches, terra cotta exterior, and shaped windows make the building seem like an old Medieval church.

Not only is the outside stunning, the interior is as well. The lobby " is a dramatic vaulted space with mosaic-covered ceilings. A grand staircase at the west end of the lobby leads up to what was originally the headquarters..."

As one of the last buildings built in New York before World War I, many buildings built after the war strongly resemble the Woolworth Building. 






"Woolworth Building." Cassgilbertsociety.org. The Cass Gilbert Society, n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.






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How 9/11 Changed Architecture

How 9/11 Changed Architecture | Being an Architect | Scoop.it
Even beyond the Freedom Tower and new Trade Center buildings rising out of the ground, Lower Manhattan has changed dramatically since September 11.
Andrew Mitchell's insight:

This article shows us that although the September 11 Attacks on the World Trade Center have made buildings safer altogether, they have created a new design style in Lower Manhattan. We learn that after 9/11, "security concerns reshaped" protective measures used by buildings. More concrete, steel, and bollards were used for protection. More importantly, however, the general style of buildings in Downtown Manhattan has drastically changed. New buildings have more glass, larger windows, more right-angles and fewer or no bricks. This shift from more classical architecture to a more modern style shows the confidence of many of the large financial institutions that occupy such buildings. The buildings are able to be larger and more extravagant, but safe as well. As the author points out, "That willingness to flaunt it, blatantly, is borne of the power of New York’s gentrification."

I generally agree with this article. I also believe that the more modern styles of Lower Manhattan are designed to be more sightly, and yet safe at the same time. Being an architect would be a good career because buildings often have more interesting implications.

 

http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2011/09/11/rebuilding-after-911/

 

Smithsimon, Greg. "How 9/11 Changed Architecture." Wall Street Journal. News Corporation, 11 Sept. 2011. Web. 5 Jan. 2013

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