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Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy

Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy | Architecture | Scoop.it

This small vacation house is designed as a stairway to the treetops.

 

Keeping the footprint to a minimum so as not to disturb the wooded site, each of the three floors has only one small bedroom and bath, each a tiny private suite. The fourth floor, which contains the living spaces, spreads out from the tower like the surrounding forest canopy, providing views of the lake and mountains in the distance, virtually the entire Catskill Mountain range. The glass-enclosed stair highlights the procession from forest floor to treetop aerie, while the dark green enameled exterior camouflages the house by reflecting the surrounding woods, and dematerializing its form...


Via Lauren Moss
Geovanni's insight:

What an interesting house to take a vacation at. :)

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ignaciano13's comment, April 19, 2013 11:30 AM
Ok Muy bonito. ¡Precioso!
Clem Stanyon's comment, May 14, 2013 5:46 PM
Nice concept, I'm not sure that geometrical shapes are goign to 'blend' with fractal ones, though.
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Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability?

Wooden Skyscrapers: A New Level of Sustainability? | Architecture | Scoop.it

A new breed of high-rise architecture is in the process of being born, thanks to the collaborative efforts of modern design pioneers. Envisioned as the best sustainable option for meeting world housing demands and decreasing global carbon emissions, wooden mega-structures are now one step closer to becoming a reality.

 

“Big Wood,” a conceptual project to the eVolo 2013 Skyscraper Competition, builds on the premise that wood, when harvested responsibly, is one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and creating healthy communities. Aspiring to become one of the greenest skyscrapers in the world, Big Wood challenges the way we build our cities and promotes timber as a reliable platform to support tomorrow’s office and residential towers...


Via Lauren Moss
Geovanni's insight:

Fascinating place. Must of been a lot of wood to be created.

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 20, 2013 8:38 AM

The Case For Tall Wood                               Michael Green Architecture

I find this hard to truly picture, but the story is solid...."the last century there has been no reason to challenge steel and concrete as the essential structural materials of large buildings. Climate change now demands that we do.....Wood is the most significant building material we use today that is grown by the sun. When harvested responsibly, wood is arguably one of the best tools architects and engineers have for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and storing carbon in our buildings."

 

“I’d put my money on solar energy…I hope we don’t have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”
~Thomas Edison, In conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone March 1931

 

http://mg-architecture.ca/portfolio/tallwood/

 

 

“Known as the birthplace of the skyscraper, Chicago is an optimal location for a prototype in mass timber construction,” writes Carlos Arzate

Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 20, 2013 1:47 PM

Whoa..Chicago!

Bubba Muntzer's comment, May 13, 2013 8:44 AM
It takes around 30 years for a seedling to grow into the kind of wood that can be used in construction. A little maintenance is required during that period. Meanwhile it's soaking up CO2 and making oxygen. The only industrial processes required are to cut it down and cut it into boards and 2 x 4s. If you stagger your planting you have an endless supply.
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Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy

Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy | Architecture | Scoop.it

This small vacation house is designed as a stairway to the treetops.

 

Keeping the footprint to a minimum so as not to disturb the wooded site, each of the three floors has only one small bedroom and bath, each a tiny private suite. The fourth floor, which contains the living spaces, spreads out from the tower like the surrounding forest canopy, providing views of the lake and mountains in the distance, virtually the entire Catskill Mountain range. The glass-enclosed stair highlights the procession from forest floor to treetop aerie, while the dark green enameled exterior camouflages the house by reflecting the surrounding woods, and dematerializing its form...


Via Lauren Moss
Geovanni's insight:

What an interesting house to take a vacation at. :)

more...
ignaciano13's comment, April 19, 2013 11:30 AM
Ok Muy bonito. ¡Precioso!
Clem Stanyon's comment, May 14, 2013 5:46 PM
Nice concept, I'm not sure that geometrical shapes are goign to 'blend' with fractal ones, though.
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18 Of The World’s Most Amazing Tree Houses

18 Of The World’s Most Amazing Tree Houses | Architecture | Scoop.it
The appeal of tree houses is fairly obvious: seclusion, sustainability, coziness, communion with nature.
Geovanni's insight:

I would LOVE to have one of these tree houses in my backyard!!!!

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