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Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway

Partly Hidden Beach House with Unobstructed Sea Views in Norway | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it
Split House is a peculiar beach house partly hidden under ground. The house's two levels are made of natural materials. Each level enables lovely sea views.

The Oslo-based architectural studio JVA designed a beach house that folds into the landscape. Located near the sea, the residence is partly hidden under ground, allowing unobstructed sea views for the neighbours. Capturing the best panoramic views, the house offers a unique living experience.

The roof is covered with grass and can be also used as a terrace whilst large expanses of glass enable panoramic views to relax and inspire. The interior feels light and airy, opening up to the landscape, with transparency playing a key role in this project, providing an incredibly warm and bright environment.


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Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, April 15, 11:41 AM

I love the uncluttered approach to this beach house. And the sleek contemporary siding combined with the natural curving cobbled walk is perfect. Can I live here!?

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Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects

Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

The Tea Houses are places where one could retreat into nature- there are three, each with its own purpose: meditation, sleeping and ‘visioning’ or creative thinking.


Each tea house is designed as a transparent steel and glass pavilion, hovering like a lantern over the natural landscape. Cast-in-place concrete core elements anchor the pavilions, supporting steel channel rim joists which cantilever beyond the cores to support the floor and roof planes. With its minimal footprint, the design treads lightly on the land, minimizing grading and preserving the delicate root systems of the native oaks.


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Emeric Nectoux's comment, January 9, 12:22 AM
Beautiful! I'm a big fan
Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, January 9, 5:51 PM

My humble glass and wood greenhouse is my go to Tea House. Everyone needs a personal place to quietly be. And tea is always recommended. 

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House D by HHF architekten

House D by HHF architekten | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Located in Nulgar, Switzerland, House D by HHF Architects has an oriention parallel to the landscape, making the view a matter of prime importance- aross more than 180 degrees, vistas include verdant land with mature fruit trees.


The design accentuates the site with a few simple moves: The main level is an open space – with the kitchen as well as dining and living areas – and alongside a concrete core, the stair to the upper and lower floors. The space is entirely glazed and blends seamlessly with the space outdoors. The outdoor space itself is an oversized terrace overlooking a pool. Because the terrain slopes downward slightly, the wood deck is elevated, which protects the main living space from the curious glances of passers-by.


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Successful Rooftop Transformation in Chicago

Successful Rooftop Transformation in Chicago | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it
A Chicago roof garden is lush and private, thanks to hardy plants, shoji screens, and well-camouflaged mechanicals.

Roof gardens can cool dense cities, making them more livable. This one, in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood, sits atop a five-story building and is reached by way of a spiral staircase on the penthouse balcony. Not only does the garden connect the owner to nature and a skyline view, it also thrives in a city famous for its strong winds and extreme seasonal temperatures.

The expansive terrace, designed by Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, is a Midwest prairie in microcosm. Two steel and mesh pergolas—a smaller one leading into the garden from the rooftop’s service entrance, and a larger one sheltering the seating area—are connected by slate pathways that wind past ipe planter boxes and a meadow of perennials and ornamental grasses. Structural concerns and exposure to the elements, of course, make rooftop transformations tricky.


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A. Perry Homes's curator insight, April 1, 12:50 AM

Beautiful! Green topped-buildings. 

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A Geometric Desert Home in Phoenix

A Geometric Desert Home in Phoenix | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

At the base of Echo Mountain in Phoenix, a geometric home by Wendell Burnette opens up to the surrounding desert landscape, while maintaining the property’s natural vegetation and rocky ground surface. 

A lone saguaro marks the southwest corner of Thomas and Laura Hyland’s property, which is situated adjacent to the Phoenix Mountain Preserve. The structure’s main living volume is elevated and faced in glass, overlooking a descending pathway that leads to a pool tucked into the site...


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Two Passive Solar Gain Houses in Porthtowan by Simon Conder Associates

Two Passive Solar Gain Houses in Porthtowan by Simon Conder Associates | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Two passive solar gain houses built into the side of a hill in the English coastal village of Porthtowan on the Cornish coast by Simon Conder Associates.

The new buildings, which are partly buried in the hill to avoid obstructing views from properties higher up the slope, have a reduced impact on the landscape. Both are built into the 1 in 7 slope of the hillside, so the houses are single storey on the road side and two storey on the seaward side.

The two adjacent sites face south and this orientation creates two passive solar gain houses to minimise both the use of fossil fuels and energy costs. This has been achieved partly by fully glazing the southern elevations of the two houses and partly by using highly insulated, high mass construction for the remainder of the two houses.


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