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Moshe Safdie Creates Spectacular Bio Dome for Singapore Airport

Moshe Safdie Creates Spectacular Bio Dome for Singapore Airport | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Moshe Safdie is famous for his iconic Montreal housing complex Habitat ’67, and he is still creating innovative large-scale urban projects around the world. The latest project his firm, Safdie Architects, has debuted is the design for development at Singapore's Changi Airport. The scheme aims to create a public gathering space with gardens, retail stores, hotel, restaurants, and entertainment that will lure travelers, airport employees, and local residents.

The glass dome will encompass a space of 134,000 square meters and houses a 130-foot-high waterfall. The dome's curved shape, recalling the tradition of glass conservatories, provides inherent structural strength to the glass and steel structure. Tree-like structural columns in a ring support the dome while a suspended roof covers the adjacent atrium space.

The space also showcases natural elements: walking trails travel through an indoor topography of trees, palms, and ferns called "Forest Valley". The different elements — dining, accommodations, and retail — are spread throughout the structure so as to give each of them impressive views of the natural features.


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Hideg House by Béres Architects

Hideg House by Béres Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Focusing on sculptural cliffs and hillside woods, Hideg-ház is an unusual object in the landscape of the outskirts of Koszeg, a historical town in Hungary.

The building is located in a country with very diverse climate. Hot summers and cold winters desire a smart mix of architectural decisions to keep the cabin comfortable and easy to run in all four seasons. The clients had a clear concept about what they wanted to achieve in terms of building services and comfort. A combination of high-tec and simple ecological solutions resulted in extremely low energy consumption and moderate building cost...


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nevcox@easypoolplans.com's curator insight, January 13, 2014 9:56 PM

A Backyard does not need to be all green, look at how carefully placed rocks can create a stunning backdrop and provide contrast on a different scale for this unique home that takes advantage of all this with carefully place windows, even using the direction the timber is laid to highlight the view.

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Downley House by BPR Architects

Downley House by BPR Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Downley House is a large new country house built in the South Downs. The client called for a tranquil yet playful place, full of natural texture, contrasts, and indigenous materials. BPR created an entrance sequence which commences in a circular stone entrance court, extends along a pergola into an inner court bounded by a ruined wall and through the house to a roof terrace where a stair bridges into the landscape.

 

Downley House is constructed of timber elements prefabricated in Swizerland and erected over a two month period. The family and guest wings are constructed of cross-laminated timber (CLT) panels and the barrel vault is made of a CLT timber shell and glue lam ribs. The low-embodied energy of the construction, the efficient envelope, ground source heat pump and heat recovery system create a highly sustainable and energy efficient building.


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+node by UID Architects | Fukuyama, Japan

+node by UID Architects | Fukuyama, Japan | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it
A family sought a light-filled residence on a sloped site in southern Japan with a design incorporating the lush greenery below.


The t-shaped house consists of two perpendicular rectilinear steel-frame volumes clad in cedar. The upper level terminates on the south in a dramatic cantilever that hovers more than 30 feet above the ground and is pierced at the end to allow a tree to grow up through the structure. The lower level is half-submerged in the embankment below.

A terrace on the roof of the master suite can be entered from the main level. Raw plywood walls and pale cherry floors unify the spare interior, while skylights and large glazed expanses frame views of the surrounding forest.


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Green Rooftop Spruces Up ‘Museum Of Art’ In Seoul

Green Rooftop Spruces Up ‘Museum Of Art’ In Seoul | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

It is hard to find a green space in a big city, so the firm SAMOO Architects and Engineers decided to incorporate a rooftop garden into the Buk Seoul Museum of Art. 

The environmentally friendly, geometric rooftops filter rainwater and insulate the museum, while its quirky shapes invite people to experience art on the rooftop gardens. 

Visit the link to take a closer look at this eco-friendly museum. 


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Duane Craig's curator insight, July 26, 2013 9:18 AM

They also become a sort of oasis in a sea of concrete and asphalt.

Shan Rose's comment, July 26, 2013 12:28 PM
nice and cool <a href="http://ielts-learn.blogspot.com/2010/06/the-8-uncertain-mythology-regarding.html">I.E.L.T.S Test mythology</a>
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A Unique Hotel Creatively Reimagines Concrete Pipes as Seating

A Unique Hotel Creatively Reimagines Concrete Pipes as Seating | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Australian architectural firm Techne has recently redesigned the Prahran Hotel and pub. The process involved the demolition of the rear extension to be replaced with a very unique and modern addition.


The designers chose to use large concrete pipes as both the pub's seating and outer facade. The tubes are stacked on top of each other to meet the building’s two-story height while still allowing plenty of natural light in through the windows. There are 17 pipes in all. The ones used for customers can hold anywhere from two to twelve guests and are complete with leather seating and timber paneling.

Other unique aspects of this renovation include the large open courtyard that enhances natural light and the concrete half-pipe that has been mounted on steel beams, acting as an alternate dining booth. The interior of the building is a mix of unfinished concrete and metal. This feature helps to contrast the warmth of the natural wood and leather found throughout the structure.


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Zaha Hadid Architects Creates A "Living" Ceiling That Reacts To Visitors' Movements

Zaha Hadid Architects Creates A "Living" Ceiling That Reacts To Visitors' Movements | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Parametric Space is an interactive installation that glows and grows when visitors enter the space.

 

You enter a dark, cavernous space then suddenly the ceiling starts to glow and expand, bearing down like a bizarre otherworldly lifeform come to greet you. But don't worry, you're not losing your mind this is a new interactive installation, Parametric Space, from Zaha Hadid Architects in collaboration with designers Kollision, CAVI, andWahlberg.

It's currently on view at the Danish Architecture Centre until September 29th 2013. The piece reacts to visitors' movements by changing color and shape. As visitors first enter the space the ceiling appears flat, but the appearance soon changes and extends into glowing funnels. As a visitor moves closer the flexible membrane grows bigger while moving away causes it to retract...


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Cliffside Ocean Residence Dramatically Adapted to an Irregular Terrain: Tula House

Cliffside Ocean Residence Dramatically Adapted to an Irregular Terrain: Tula House | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Tula house in Quadra Island, British Columbia, Canada, is an example of modern architecture blending in a harsh natural surroundings.

Envisioned by Patkau Architects and perched 44 feet above the Pacific Ocean on a remote island, it reflects the casual irregularity of the sites rock ledges, beach, and forest in both its geometric and spatial order: “The topography of the site is highly irregular; the prospects diverse. Moss covered basalt hills are interspersed among treed expanses and richly vegetated crevices, valleys and swales.”

From a distance, the residence seems to visually fade away into the dark forest. Planted in moss and native ground covers, the continuous roof stands out with its rich geometry. Narrow skylights project lines of light at oblique angles through the inner spaces. “A loose arrangement of concrete walls, clad in staggered fiber-cement panels” define the structure of this unconventional ocean dwelling. A cantilevered wooden deck with steel frames creates a stunning outdoor area for relaxation. The living zone is sober, yet almost hypnotizing with its glazed apertures and incredible views.


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Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects

Tea Houses by Swatt Miers Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

The Tea Houses are places where one could retreat into nature- there are three, each with its own purpose: meditation, sleeping and ‘visioning’ or creative thinking.


Each tea house is designed as a transparent steel and glass pavilion, hovering like a lantern over the natural landscape. Cast-in-place concrete core elements anchor the pavilions, supporting steel channel rim joists which cantilever beyond the cores to support the floor and roof planes. With its minimal footprint, the design treads lightly on the land, minimizing grading and preserving the delicate root systems of the native oaks.


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Emeric Nectoux's comment, January 9, 2014 12:22 AM
Beautiful! I'm a big fan
Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, January 9, 2014 5:51 PM

My humble glass and wood greenhouse is my go to Tea House. Everyone needs a personal place to quietly be. And tea is always recommended. 

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Casa Transportable house ÁPH80 by Ábaton

Casa Transportable house ÁPH80 by Ábaton | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it
Casa Transportable house ÁPH80 by Ábaton that fits on the back of a lorry and moved by road, with cement board walls and hinged panels.

Ábaton chose dimensions of nine by three metres to provide just enough space for two people and also allow the transportable house to be hoisted onto the back of a truck.

Externally the home is clad entirely in grey cement-board panels that hinge open to reveal sliding glass doors in the front and windows to the sides.

More details and photos at the link. 


 


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Pre's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:36 PM

This is a unique house, it looks like a box but it totally different. 

IrineLogs's comment, September 4, 2013 7:36 AM
Nice!
Mehdi BH's comment, September 5, 2013 10:39 AM
Great Idea :)
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Shigeru Ban completes Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch

Shigeru Ban completes Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

The Cardboard Cathedral by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban opened in Christchurch, New Zealand.

The building was designed as a temporary replacement for the city's former Anglican cathedral, which was destroyed by the earthquake that struck the city in February 2011. With an expected lifespan of around 50 years, it will serve the community until a more permanent cathedral can be constructed.

The building features a triangular profile constructed from 98 equally sized cardboard tubes. These surround a coloured glass window made from tessellating triangles, decorated with images from the original cathedral's rose window.


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Nanying University Learning Hub by Thomas Heatherwick

Nanying University Learning Hub by Thomas Heatherwick | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Thomas Heatherwick's Learning Hub for Nanyang Technological University democratizes the learning experience with cylindrical towers.

 

The design resists the idea that university buildings need be compositions of artificially lit, endless corridors with a distinct cylindrical shapes that maximize daylight and encourages the incidental meeting of fellow entrepreneurs, scientists or colleagues. 55 tutorial rooms are devoid of traditional hallways and organized around a central space that links the towers together.


Students can enter the corner-free spaces from 360 degrees and engage with colleagues and professors on rooftop gardens. The upper floors and green rooftops enjoy views of picturesque synthetic and natural landscapes. Award-winning green measures include the use of hydrophilic polymers, a material process that eliminates the need for irrigation, vertical greenery and recycled concrete aggregate as a material. The design will be completed in 2014.


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Travis Haggerty's curator insight, July 17, 2013 3:21 PM

Wow... Now that is some futuristic design right there. It would be great to get a look at this when it is done. 

aboali's comment, July 17, 2013 7:52 PM
thanks
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Contemporary Green Design: Merricks House by Robson Rak Architects

Contemporary Green Design: Merricks House by Robson Rak Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Robson Rak Architects have designed a house on a 10-acre farm located in Merricks North near Melbourne, Australia. The property was bought as a weekender with the intention of building a new house with enough room for their family to grow and enjoy through the generations.


From the architects: 

In accordance to the client’s desire for simplicity and material honesty, the house has been reduced to a modest palette of earth, glass and timber. The majority of the internal walls are rammed earth, creating a beautiful, warm, textural look and feel.

The walls are 400mm thick with an internal strip of 100mm thick foam insulation, assisting the natural qualities of the rammed earth in maintaining a consistent internal temperature. The R-value of the walls up to a very high level, and the double-glazing of all windows and doors assists the building in being extremely environmentally efficient as attested by our clients. The high thermal mass of these walls has made the house thermally efficient. Openable windows on the east, west, north and south allows cross ventilation.


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Window Revival's comment, July 17, 2013 12:18 AM
A really lovely home. Rustic yet very modern.
aboali's comment, July 17, 2013 5:04 AM
that nice desing
Suzy Koch's curator insight, August 2, 2013 8:17 PM

Love all the great features in this contemporary green design!

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Sustainable Development: South Chase housing by Alison Brooks Architects

Sustainable Development: South Chase housing by Alison Brooks Architects | Architecture and Architectural Jobs | Scoop.it

Suburban housing development in Essex by Alison Brooks Architects that reinterprets the local rural architecture of wood and sloping roofs..


London firm Alison Brooks Architects used dark-stained timber and sloping rooftops for this suburban housing development.

Describing the goals of the development, Alison Brooks says she wanted to create "a completely new and more sustainable suburban housing typology where open-plan flexible houses are integrated with outdoor spaces to increase the sense of space and light".

 

The architect also emphasised the importance of creating "dedicated working spaces" in each house, adapting to the growing number of people who work from home and "helping to create an economically active suburb". In line with this, each house comes with an accessible loft that can be converted into an office and the larger houses also include a ground-floor study that doubles up as a spare bedroom...


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