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Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence

Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

The WFH House in China, designed by Copenhagen-based studio, Arcgency is a contemporary design, constructed of three stacked shipping containers.


The house surrounded by lush vegetation  ”was designed to produce more energy than it consumes through the use of upcycled shipping containers as a steel frame, a sustainable bamboo facade, a rainwater collection system, solar cell-clad green roof and permeable paving.”

The interior is neat, dressed up in impeccable white, yet with splashes of color here and there. The main floor is envisioned as one singular space that accommodates the kitchen, dining area and the living room. The main advantage is that, this type of space delimitation allows a seamless transition between the indoor environments...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

The WFH House is a perfect example of my inspiration for my Architecture Repurposing topic... it's sustainable, energy-efficient and innovative. It is a elegant representation of repurposing materials to be used in creative and intelligent alternate spacial use and design. The interior design is just as seamless and minimalistic as the outside and creates an open feel, as well. If you're at all curious about how the masterminds behind shipping container homes, do what they do, you'll find this blog interesting. The small array of pictures goes from the finished product all the way down the skeleton of the home and it's really quite fascinating to see the actual raw, industrial looking shipping containers being transformed into a modern, minimalistic and elegant home. 

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James Haydon's comment, March 3, 2013 9:52 AM
I totally agree.
Immotopic's curator insight, March 4, 2013 1:06 AM

Le moins c'est le mieux*

Immotopic's comment, March 4, 2013 1:07 AM
Less is better*
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Finland's Wuxi Theater: An Iconic Design that Harvests Rainwater

Finland's Wuxi Theater: An Iconic Design that Harvests Rainwater | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Like the iconic waterfront Sydney Opera House, the Wuxi Grand Theatre, built by Finland’s PES-Architects, benefits from its location.


Located on a manmade peninsula, the theater is highly visible from all directions- a prime spot that provided the opportunity to construct an eye-catching roof that places the building in a direct dialogue with the city’s weather. Eight massive steel wings stretch out from the roof 50 meters high, adding a distinct sculptural element while reflecting direct sunlight, sheltering interior spaces from excessive heat. The slanted roof also works to harvest rainwater, taking advantage of the local climate and reducing the building’s impact on the environment.

Thousands of LED lights illuminate the aluminum wings; inside, the Main Auditorium is covered by over 15,000 bamboo blocks, capturing the local character while infusing a distinctly Finnish element in its forms and materials.

 

One year after its opening, the theater has seamlessly integrated its green terraces and lakeside landscape into the urban context and local culture...



Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

I love the idea of Finnish architecture meeting in this locale to design this magnificent theater. Not only does the purpose of the architecture and the sustainability and environmental friendly aspects of this building speak for itself but the design of the life-like butterfly wings blends in gorgeously to it's surrounding landscape. The design and overall appearance can be appreciated at home and abroad and is a sight to behold, I'm sure. The inside is as equally as impressive as the outside- which has an interesting job of harvesting rainwater and regulating the amount of heat that may need to be reflected off of the building... which cuts down on energy usage. 

Impressive, PES Architects.

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Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 12:12 PM

We can save the world through education.  Expose your students to innovations around the world as starters for innovative student projects.

ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 29, 2013 7:35 AM

A breathtaking setting and an award winning design.

 

"Evoking the character of a butterfly, eight massive steel wings stretch out from the roof 50 meters from the ground. While the wings add a distinct sculptural element to the crown of the theater, they reflect direct sunlight, sheltering interior spaces from excessive heat. The slanting of the roof wings also work to harvest rainwater, taking advantage of the local climate and reducing the building’s impact on the environment"


bravo....beautiful...PES Architects

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Wharton’s Entire San Francisco Campus Earns LEED Gold Certification

Wharton’s Entire San Francisco Campus Earns LEED Gold Certification | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Wharton's new San Francisco Campus in the historic Hills Brothers Coffee Plant earns LEED Gold with the help of Gensler.

 

The campus expanded the school's presence on the west coast by moving into the historic Hills Brothers Coffee Plant on the Embarcadero. Designed by Gensler, the sustainable renovation of the space into a word-class teaching facility schools some of the other buildings in the city with eco-conscious materials, a green cleaning program and locally-sourced food for the cafeteria.

 

Gensler designed the adaptive reuse of the 37,000 sq ft facility, which includes state-of-the-art group study rooms and amphitheater-style classrooms with HD video conferencing. Renovation and upgrades included a strong focus on natural daylighting, use of locally-sourced and eco friendly materials as well as the installation of energy efficient lighting, equipment and systems.




Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

Besides repurposing, I'm a big fan of anything LEED and this deserves some serious credit, of course.

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Off-Grid, Design/Build: The House on Limekiln Line

Off-Grid, Design/Build: The House on Limekiln Line | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

An extraordinary off grid home built with local materials, that fits right into the rural Ontario landscape, the House on Limekiln Line is an extraordinary artifact, addressing a 220 year old heritage, with a modern aesthetic.

 

From the architects:

The House on Limekiln Line, a design-build off-grid house, is sited in a rich agricultural landscape.The house is understood as both a mediator to and a microcosm of its immediate cultural and climatic context. An “observation shed”, the house is composed of a series of scales of spaces, each with distinct vantage points, visual alignments, and framed vistas to the larger context beyond, facilitating stewardship of and respect for the productive landscape in which it sits...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

Off grid living at its finest- definitely needs to be explored more in some cases. The local materials are a great way of resourcing too!

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This Lisbon Home Has A Green Facade That “Breathes”

This Lisbon Home Has A Green Facade That “Breathes” | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Sustainability in architecture reveals itself in many forms, some more subtle or hidden than others. It’s much more complicated an issue than just green lawning your building, but sometimes that’s just what you need to get your message across.


The House in Travessa do Patrocínio by RA\\ does just that. The narrow townhouse is situated in the center of Lisbon, in a neighborhood with little access to green spaces. To compensate for this, the architects draped the house with lush green facades that cover 100 square-meters of wall space.

The facades are integral components to the architecture, and are planted with approximately 4,500 plants sourced from 25 different local varieties, all of which require little maintenance. The result is a vertical garden that functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about.

Though small and humble in proportion,  the architects hope that the house is an “example of sustainability for the city of Lisbon,” a new urban model applicable at all scales of building.


Via Lauren Moss
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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, March 25, 2013 9:07 AM

The footprint of this home is relatively modest, the green statment it makes is bold and beautiful. The green wall the architects say functions as an urban “lung” within the pavement-heavy area, helping to rid the residential street of excess noise, carbon, and other pollutants floating about. Read on....

Mary H Goudie's curator insight, August 26, 2013 9:53 AM

Just round the corner from my apartment in Campo de Ourique, one of this city's little inner residential villages! I check out the progress of the vertical plantation once in a while and wish I could have my apartment clad in the same. Come up & see it for yourselves - just grab a 28 or 25 antique tram, both pass right below my window. 

Brett Christie-Taylor's curator insight, March 24, 1:08 PM

A beautiful example of a home that is embracing sustainable engineering and something that we should all be trying to do.

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Case Study in Efficiency: SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea

Case Study in Efficiency:  SOM's Diagonal Tower in South Korea | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

SOM’s Diagonal Tower in Yongsan International Business District of Seoul, South Korea, is a case study in efficiency – the 343 meter tall tower successfully minimizes wind loads, reduces construction costs, provides dramatic views and meets strict energy codes by integrating massing, structure and performance.

 

The design of this landmark skyscraper, with glazed triangular facets, employs passive environmental control strategies within and on the façade – sunshades are positioned at varying angles on each building exposure, mitigating heat gain in the summer and permitting direct sunlight to warm the building’s interiors during the cold winter months. Triple pane glazed exterior curtain wall decreases energy loss, while active chilled beam system surpasses traditional air driven systems, using water as a medium for transferring heating and cooling energy, which results in less energy consumption along with great environmental comfort for building users...

 


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

A really interesting and amazing building. Very self sufficient and really quite fascinating. It's enery-efficient and great to look at simultaneously.

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Kang ji yun 's curator insight, May 25, 2013 8:59 PM

It is very wonderful building!! when it comes to the diagonal tower, it serves more than visual stimuli. Even though the Diagonal Tower is similar to Norman Foster's Hearst Tower in New York, it's megaframe reduces the amount of steel required by over 25% when compared to conventionally framed buildings.

Amelia's comment, May 26, 2013 6:59 AM
I hope we have one also in Daejeon.. hehe..
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Living in 'An Extension of Nature': CasasNaAreia in Portugal

Living in 'An Extension of Nature': CasasNaAreia in Portugal | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

CasasNaAreia is a gorgeous holiday retreat based on the transformation of old masonry buildings into new, contemporary structures.


The property is about the experience of living almost in an extension of the natural environment, especially in the kitchen/dining area – which is laid out with a carpet of fine sand. One of the two wooden volumes was converted into a two-bedroom pavilion and the other is employed for common and social areas.

Surrounded by rice paddies and umbrella pine forest, CasasNaAreia looks out onto the Sado estuary, famous for its stunning sunsets, salt pans, flamingos and flocks of dolphins...


Via Lauren Moss
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A Floating School That Won’t Flood

A Floating School That Won’t Flood | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Makoko is a water-logged settlement in Lagos, home to about 250,000 people living mostly in makeshift structures on stilts.


Instead of stilts,  Kunlé Adeyemi, a Nigerian-born architect who now lives in Holland, sees floating structures with better access to power and fresh water and more sustainable means of waste disposal.

His first project--what he calls a "seed to cultivate a new type of urbanism on water in African cities"--is a floating school. The three-story structure is 108 square feet at its base, and 33 feet high. It sits on a flotation deck made of 256 used plastic drums. And the body is all wood, which is sourced locally. The building is designed for about 100 students (aged 4 to 12), and has its own power system based around solar panels on the roof...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

This is an amazingly good use of architecture and it's alternate purposes and uses. It's a creative and innovative way of redesigning the structure and living means of a community that struggles with flooding and is wholly a water-based living society. The main means of transportation is canoe and so where else should their homes and schools be but on the water? These drum-bottomed, 33 feet high structures give this community a school that is practically flood-proof and can sustain itself with solar panels, as well.

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Your Home is Lovely: chic interiors on a budget: A (very) industrial look

Your Home is Lovely: chic interiors on a budget: A (very) industrial look | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Via ParadigmGallery
Natalie Curtis's insight:

This isn't so much as repurposing of the architecture of this space alone, but simply re-thinking the idea of the usage for this space with interior design. And some brilliant interior design, might I add. In my belief, architecture and interior design can loosely or closely go hand and hand as a perfect couple and here is kind of the best of both worlds. The owner, a sculptor/architect dynamic managed to make this old garage/workshop space come alive with some industrial pieces such as the old chemist's counter in the kitchen, the large propeller, all the wood and steel touches with the mix of modern and vintage is to a T what the space would have hoped it's legacy to be and with a great owner to boot. So, perhaps this isn't some masterpiece of redesigning a factory to a library but it's pretty similar in that the space is repurposed for a living area. 

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:03 PM

This is a great reinvention of a space which has lived other lives as an old garage, a lunch counter for the Navy Yard and then a motorcycle repair shop. Elena Columbo "made it work" as Tim Gunn would say and created a wonderful home that maintains the authenticity of the original space.

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Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy

Tower House: Architecture that Camouflages into the Tree Canopy | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

This small vacation house is designed as a stairway to the treetops.


Keeping the footprint to a minimum so as not to disturb the wooded site, each of the three floors has only one small bedroom and bath, each a tiny private suite. The fourth floor, which contains the living spaces, spreads out from the tower like the surrounding forest canopy, providing views of the lake and mountains in the distance, virtually the entire Catskill Mountain range. The glass-enclosed stair highlights the procession from forest floor to treetop aerie, while the dark green enameled exterior camouflages the house by reflecting the surrounding woods, and dematerializing its form...


Via Lauren Moss
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ignaciano13's comment, April 19, 2013 11:30 AM
Ok Muy bonito. ¡Precioso!
Geovanni's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:01 AM

What an interesting house to take a vacation at. :)

Clem Stanyon's comment, May 14, 2013 5:46 PM
Nice concept, I'm not sure that geometrical shapes are goign to 'blend' with fractal ones, though.
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A Living Bridge by Rotterdam-based Creative Group, Observatorium

A Living Bridge by Rotterdam-based Creative Group, Observatorium | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Since 1997, the group Observatorium, based in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, has been committed to creating relationships between art, landscape and society. Designed to be for the common good, their work aims to create a sense of place.


Waiting for the River is a living bridge, with benches, hostel-style rooms, and eco-bathroom  - entirely made of used planks. The 38-metre long zigzag bridge anticipates the new clean river valley Emscher, which is now still an open sewer. It sits over the waste land that will be the site of pastoral landscape in ten years time. It serves as an example for the future development of the Emscher Park in the Ruhr area for which the authorities have coined the description ‘productive park’.

Intended as a temporary structure the house will now be reconstructed and made permanent.
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Aspire Mixed-Use Tower Proposal by Grimshaw Architects

Aspire Mixed-Use Tower Proposal by Grimshaw Architects | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Emerging from a design excellence competition held by the Parramatta City Council, the Aspire Tower, designed by Grimshaw Architects, is a landmark mixed-use tower set to establish a new benchmark for innovative, passive-environmental design in Australian high-rise developments.

Designed to act as a catalyst project for Parramatta Square, the tower provides high density, urban residential living which is not only affordable but also sustainable.

As one of the tallest structures in Australia, the engineering of Aspire Tower consciously orientates itself to the wind and to sunlight. The highly adaptable facades accommodate all of the various planning arrangements of apartment type into a modular system. The tower’s striking sculptural form twists upwards from its Church Street alignment to maximise the capture of the sun, the breeze and northern views for its residents.


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

"As one of the tallest structures in Australia, the engineering of Aspire Tower consciously orientates itself to the wind and to sunlight. The highly adaptable facades accommodate all of the various planning arrangements of apartment type into a modular system. The tower’s striking sculptural form twists upwards from its Church Street alignment to maximise the capture of the sun, the breeze and northern views for its residents."

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IE Paper Pavilion by Shigeru Ban

IE Paper Pavilion by Shigeru Ban | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has completed a temporary pavilion made from cardboard tubes at the IE School of Architecture and Design in Madrid. 

The Paper Pavilion, which was recently inaugurated, is constructed in the university's Serrano garden and will serve as a multi-purpose space for events, meetings, talks and exhibitions.

The project had a restricted budget, so Shigeru Ban designed a system of cardboard roof trusses and columns which were cheap to install and can be easily recycled when the building is eventually dismantled. The tubes were manufactured and waterproofed locally in Spain and were assembled by members of the surrounding community.

The IE School commissioned the pavilion, supported by the Japan Foundation. The opening event was a lecture by Ban entitled "Appropriate Architecture"...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

Who said cardboard isn't sustainable... never met Sigeru Ban. All he wanted was a quick place to set up and give a lecture. This common ground for architects, students and enthusiasts is cheap, sustainable for what it is, easily recycled and already recycled and has a low impact on the environment because of this... and a low impact on budget. It's a really clever way to set up shop really quick and even looks nice for it's temporary span.

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Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens

Agora Tower, Taipei: A Twisting Skyscraper Wrapped With Vertical Gardens | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

Taipei just broke ground on a twisting skyscraper that is wrapped with a jungle of vertical gardens...

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Designed to mimic two encircling hands and the helical structure of DNA, the towers are organized a central core that allows for a “hyper-abundance of suspended gardens.” These will spill over with edible and decorative plants, enabling residents of 40 luxury apartments to harvest a great deal of their own food (except for protein.) Plus, the rainwater capture system alleviates pressure on the municipal water supply and gives the complex even greater independence.

Each 540 square meter apartment will have an interior green wall as well, ensuring optimum air quality and a great green aesthetics. A circular light funnel will push daylighting right down to the basement of the building, a solar roof will provide energy, and low E glass will mitigate excess solar gain and prevent thermal loss.

Complete with nanotechnology and a host of other high-tech features, this one-of-a-kind tower may well be the greenest of its kind when it is completed circa 2016....


Via Lauren Moss
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Florence @ddline2020 's curator insight, March 10, 2013 1:20 AM

Designed by Vincent Callebaut Architecture, the 455,000-square-foot Agora Tower will have an orchard, a vegetable garden, space for aromatic and medicinal plants, and a compost and rainwater capture system.

Pagina Uno's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:10 AM

Progettato per imitare la struttura elicoidale del DNA, le torri sono organizzate intorno ad un nucleo centrale che ha permesso la realizzare un "iper-abbondanza di giardini sospesi." Questi traboccano di piante commestibili e decorative, che consentono ai residenti dei 40 appartamenti di lusso di raccogliere una grande quantità di cibo. Inoltre, un sistema di raccolta delle acque piovane allevia il peso sulla rete idrica comunale e dà indipendenza al complesso.

Bubba Muntzer's comment, March 10, 2013 10:30 AM
This is a real fad now, skyscrapers that twist toward the sky like that, isn't it? I can't help but wonder about the legacy. Are we entering a new era where the species is losing its self consciousness, or have these architects simply not heard the old limerick about the heartbreak when the man who was threaded one way fell in love with the woman who was threaded the other way?
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Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers

Cargotecture – the Rise of Recycling Shipping Containers | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

One man’s trash is said to be another man’s treasure, and now old cargo shipping containers are rapidly becoming sought-after treasure in the architecture industry.


The term cargotecture, coined in 2005 by HyBrid Architecture, is used to describe any building partially or entirely built from recycled ISO shipping containers. It may seem strange that such a simple, aesthetically-unappealing box could be so loved by modern architects, but the increased use of reclaimed materials in architecture is starting to show no bounds.

In a world dominated by mass production, architects are being forced to find alternative ways of designing buildings that will make the smallest impact on the earth. Extending the life of discarded materials and saving salvageable items from landfill is a completely viable approach.

Shipping containers are resistant to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes, proving themselves to be extremely resilient.

 

Somewhat like stacking blocks of Lego, steel or aluminum shipping containers are a perfectly strong building block...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

I love that I've finally found the neologism for this type of architecture finally! Cargotecture is an upcoming trend in the architect's world and this article is actually one of the most brief and yet informative blogs I may have found in my short search, so far of these shipping container homes and buildings. The containers prove to be a very useful and easily moveable. They are in great abundance, which is fantastic since they are so often used for their resilience to fire, termites, hurricanes and earthquakes. So there's my answer finally to why these containers are becoming so popular amongst architects.

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oliviersc's comment, January 12, 2013 1:18 PM
Dans la Revue du blogs : Sashimi de Java = http://blogoliviersc.org/?p=6173
Pierre R Chantelois's comment, January 12, 2013 6:56 PM
Quelle excellente idée. Si les gouvernements pouvaient en réquisitionner quelques milliers, ils pourraient en faire don à Haïti pour accéler la mise à niveau de la qualité de vie de la population. Un 12 décembre, il y a trois ans...
oliviersc's comment, January 13, 2013 7:35 AM
Hélas, les bonnes idées ne sont pas rentables...
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Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence

Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it

The WFH House in China, designed by Copenhagen-based studio, Arcgency is a contemporary design, constructed of three stacked shipping containers.


The house surrounded by lush vegetation  ”was designed to produce more energy than it consumes through the use of upcycled shipping containers as a steel frame, a sustainable bamboo facade, a rainwater collection system, solar cell-clad green roof and permeable paving.”

The interior is neat, dressed up in impeccable white, yet with splashes of color here and there. The main floor is envisioned as one singular space that accommodates the kitchen, dining area and the living room. The main advantage is that, this type of space delimitation allows a seamless transition between the indoor environments...


Via Lauren Moss
Natalie Curtis's insight:

The WFH House is a perfect example of my inspiration for my Architecture Repurposing topic... it's sustainable, energy-efficient and innovative. It is a elegant representation of repurposing materials to be used in creative and intelligent alternate spacial use and design. The interior design is just as seamless and minimalistic as the outside and creates an open feel, as well. If you're at all curious about how the masterminds behind shipping container homes, do what they do, you'll find this blog interesting. The small array of pictures goes from the finished product all the way down the skeleton of the home and it's really quite fascinating to see the actual raw, industrial looking shipping containers being transformed into a modern, minimalistic and elegant home. 

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James Haydon's comment, March 3, 2013 9:52 AM
I totally agree.
Immotopic's curator insight, March 4, 2013 1:06 AM

Le moins c'est le mieux*

Immotopic's comment, March 4, 2013 1:07 AM
Less is better*
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An Adidas Pop-Up Store That Looks Like A Giant Shoebox - DesignTAXI.com

An Adidas Pop-Up Store That Looks Like A Giant Shoebox - DesignTAXI.com | Architectural Repurposing | Scoop.it
An Adidas Pop-Up Store That Looks Like A Giant Shoebox - DesignTAXI.com

Via Teapot_Barry
Natalie Curtis's insight:

So, here's a little look at how you can rethink the idea of even something so commonplace as a retail store. What better idea than to use a retail store actually! Especially one such as adidas that utilises creativity in their designs to produce shoes... of all things. This may not be the pride and glory of redesigning our idea of architecture or anything, but it is a good starter to get our brains working towards rethinking our spatial use. 

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Teapot_Barry's curator insight, February 19, 2013 6:50 AM

I love pop up stores and this is one of the best I've seen.

Volkan Atik's curator insight, May 1, 2013 7:52 AM

fantastic, want one to live in, much better than my flat !