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Child skeleton uncovered in Bishop Street car park may date back to Siege of ... - Belfast Telegraph

Child skeleton uncovered in Bishop Street car park may date back to Siege of ... - Belfast Telegraph | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Belfast Telegraph
Child skeleton uncovered in Bishop Street car park may date back to Siege of ...
Belfast Telegraph
Dr Emily Murray, director of the Centre of Archaeology at Queen's University Belfast, is leading the excavation.
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A Twelfth Century Hand-Warmer | Irish Archaeology

A Twelfth Century Hand-Warmer | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
This unusual bronze ball is actually a medieval hand-warmer, dating from the 12th century. Now housed in the Hunt Museum in Limerick it would have been used, most likely by a priest, during the cold winter months....
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Medieval Poison Ring Used for Political Murders : DNews

Medieval Poison Ring Used for Political Murders : DNews | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
The ring has a hole with a cartridge that was likely used for pouring poison into drinks. Continue reading → (Medieval Poison Ring Used for Political Murders.
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16th century Irish hipsters | Irish Archaeology

16th century Irish hipsters | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
I recently spotted a remarkably modern-looking haircut on an image depicting a group 16th century Irish soldiers.
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Mesolithic Mount Sandel, a Mesolithic campsite | Irish Archaeology

Mesolithic Mount Sandel, a Mesolithic campsite | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Approximately 9,000 years ago, a small band of Mesolithic hunter-gathers chose a high ridge over-looking the River Bann in Co. Derry as their home
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16th century Irish hipsters | Irish Archaeology

16th century Irish hipsters | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
I recently spotted a remarkably modern-looking haircut on an image depicting a group 16th century Irish soldiers.
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Community archaeology at Prehen House this Saturday - Derry Journal

Community archaeology at Prehen House this Saturday - Derry Journal | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Derry Journal
Community archaeology at Prehen House this Saturday
Derry Journal
Prehen House will host a community archaeological dig this Saturday. The event, described as family friendly, will run from 1-4pm and everyone is welcome.
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Treasure into ashes: A 19th century cist burial discovery | Irish Archaeology

Treasure into ashes: A 19th century cist burial discovery | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
The folklore and superstitions surrounding the discovery of a Bronze Age cist burial in 19th century Wexford.
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Are there ghosts in this old image of Iona Abbey?

Are there ghosts in this old image of Iona Abbey? | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it

IONA ABBEY, founded sometime prior to 1203 on the site where St Columba built his monastery in the sixth century, was built following Ranald Somerled’s invitation to the Benedictine order of monks to construct a new monastery - and the first Benedictine nunnery - on the site of the original church.

 

Historic Scotland has been researching the archaeology of the abbey as part of their re-presentation of the site.

In this image from around 1900, kindly provided by the RCAHMS, several ghostly figures appear to be walking across the courtyard. The result of a simple double exposure? Or is it a case of the paranormal being captured in an old photo?


Via David Connolly
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La Tène Era 'Celtic' Burials from France | Irish Archaeology

La Tène Era 'Celtic' Burials from France | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
A number of spectacular La Tène era ‘Celtic’ burials have recently been uncovered by archaeologist working at Buchères in north central France.
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Dublin's oldest road? | Irish Archaeology

Dublin's oldest road? | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Dublin's earliest road was discovered during an archaeological excavation carried out in the south city centre. Dating from c.
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The Ballynolan Thistle Brooch | Irish Archaeology

The Ballynolan Thistle Brooch | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
The Ballynolan thistle brooch from Co. Limerick. This type of Early Medieval brooch derives its name from the distinctive thistle-head like motifs which adorn its terminals.
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Irish weights were a key Viking Age trading tool

Irish weights were a key Viking Age trading tool | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it

The great streams of silver that reached Scandinavia in the Viking Ages – first the Arabic silver from Russia, and later coins from Germany and Britain – were for the most part converted into silver jewellery by local craftsmen.

Much of the silver arrived as coins, whether through trade, looting or as paid danegeld [a tax raised to pay tribute to the Viking raiders to save a town from being ravaged]. However, in the beginning the central element was the weight of the silver, rather than the coins themselves.

This turned the balance weight scale into an important tool, along with its accompanying weights. Weights were among the most important tools in the Viking Age as they were a prerequisite for many types of trading. The weights made it possible to value items and to get the correct payment for them – the very nerve centre of business. Trading was a highly specialised profession, and items of great value were sometimes at stake.

 


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A Pair of Late Bronze Age Gold Bracelets from Co. Offaly | Irish Archaeology

A Pair of Late Bronze Age Gold Bracelets from Co. Offaly | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
The Derrinboy armlets are a pair of magnificent gold bracelets that were found deep within an Irish bog.
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Grotesques and Gargoyles: A Modern Twist | Irish Archaeology

Grotesques and Gargoyles: A Modern Twist | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
For this weeks Friday fun I have shown a number of grotesques and gargoyles that have undergone modern twists, often to comic effect. Adorning the walls of medieval churches these unusual sculptures are remarkable sights.
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Whence the Earliest Berliners? (Part 1) ~ Powered By Osteons

Whence the Earliest Berliners? (Part 1) ~ Powered By Osteons | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it

Via David Connolly
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Through the millennia: Irish Archaeology in photos | Irish Archaeology

Through the millennia: Irish Archaeology in photos | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Here is a selection of amazing images from our Photography Competition, this time spanning the entire breadth of Irish archaeology.
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Cambodian jungle graveyard mystifies experts

Cambodian jungle graveyard mystifies experts | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it

Over a hundred 'burial jars' and a dozen coffins arranged on a ledge in remote Cambodian jungle have for centuries held the bones -- and secrets -- of a mysterious people who lived alongside with the Angkor era.

 

Why the bones were placed in jars on a cliff some 100 metres (320 feet) high in the Cardamom Mountains, or indeed whose remains they are, has long puzzled experts.

 

For seven years Nancy Beavan, an archaeologist who specialises in carbon dating, has been looking for an answer, painstakingly piecing together clues left by the enigmatic people at 10 sites dotted across the area in southwestern Cambodia.

 

Tests show some of the bone fragments are six centuries old, according to the New Zealander.

 

"Why put these bones in jars? This was a practice that was not observed in any other part of Cambodia," she said.

 

Ten jars, dating from the 15th to the 17th centuries, and twelve coffins -- the earliest from the 14th century -- have been found at the Phnom Pel site.

 

Some are believed to have come from the kingdom of Siam, now Thailand.

 

Others, a minority, date back to the powerful kingdom of Angkor, which ruled for six centuries and built the famous Angkor Wat temple complex further to the north.

 

But experts remain mystified as to why the bones were preserved in a Buddhist country where cremation is -- and was -- a key religious custom.

 


Via David Connolly
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This Castle's Toilet Still Holds Parasites From Crusaders' Feces | Surprising Science

This Castle's Toilet Still Holds Parasites From Crusaders' Feces | Surprising Science | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Holy crap! Castle's toilet still holds parasites from crusader's faeces! http://t.co/jUJvubrImY #archaeology #biology by @RachelNuwer
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Poulnabrone Tomb: Life and Death in the Burren | Irish Archaeology

Poulnabrone Tomb: Life and Death in the Burren | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
The Neolithic portal tomb at Poulnabrone is one of Ireland's most iconic sites. Excavations at the tomb have given a remarkable insight into the lives of our early ancestors
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Earliest Victim Of Child Abuse Seen In Ancient Cemetery

Earliest Victim Of Child Abuse Seen In Ancient Cemetery | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it

Archaeologists discovered the remains of a toddler in Romano-Christian-period cemetery in Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt, who showed evidence of child abuse. Here, mud bricks for two tomb structures in the cemetery. In the foreground, several excavated graves can be seen.

In particular, the so-called Kellis 2 cemetery, which is located in the Dakhleh Oasis town of Kellis (southwest of Cairo), reflects Christian mortuary practices. For example, "instead of having children in different places, everyone is put in one place, which is an unusual practice at this time," Wheeler told LiveScience. Dating methods using radioactive carbon from skeletons suggest the cemetery was used between A.D. 50 and A.D. 450.

When the researchers came across the abused toddler — labeled "Burial 519" — in Kellis 2, nothing seemed out of the ordinary at first. But when Wheeler's colleague Tosha Duprasbegan brushing the sand away, she noticed prominent fractures on the child's arms.

 


Via David Connolly
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Roman coins from Newgrange | Irish Archaeology

Roman coins from Newgrange | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
This pair of gold Roman coins were discovered at the great Neolithic passage tomb at Newgrange, Co. Meath. Probably representing votive offerings, they were deposited at the tomb sometime during the 4th century AD.
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The Men Who Hunted Heads

Filmed by Christoph von Furer-Haimendorf in 1970. Broadcast by the BBC in the 1970's and based on fieldwork carried out in Nagaland and Arunchal Pradesh. The...

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St. George's rock-cut church, Ethiopia | Irish Archaeology

St. George's rock-cut church, Ethiopia | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology Updates | Scoop.it
Hewn out of sold rock, the extraordinary church of St. George (Bet Giorgis), Ethiopia represents one of the wonders of the ancient world.
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