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35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis

35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

At least 35 small pyramids, along with graves, have been discovered clustered closely together at a site called Sedeinga in Sudan.

 

Discovered between 2009 and 2012, researchers are surprised at how densely the pyramids are concentrated.

 

They date back to a time when a kingdom named Kush flourished in Sudan. Kush shared a border with Egypt and, later on, the Roman Empire. The desire of the kingdom's people to build pyramids was apparently influenced by Egyptian funerary architecture.

 

Because it lasted for hundreds of years they built more, more, more pyramids and after centuries they started to fill all the spaces that were still available in the necropolis." [See Photos of the Newly Discovered Pyramids]

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The real 'Google pyramids' revealed

The real 'Google pyramids' revealed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The place that went viral last month as the potential site of a mysterious Egyptian pyramid looks more like a series of mounds on the surface of Mars when you see it up close.

The site has been familiar to Egyptologists since the 1920s: It's thought to have been the locale for a desert settlement going back to Egypt's Ptolemaic era, when Greek and Roman influences were on the ascendance. Did these mounds serve as watchtowers, or tombs, or well sites? That's what the Soknopaiou Nesos Project wants to find out.

Egyptologist Paola Davoli of Italy's University of Salento in Leccefrom the project has also been in touch with Angela Micol, the North Carolina researcher who turned the spotlight on Dimai last month via her Google Earth Anomalies website.

 

Based on the satellite imagery, Micol imained that the mounds represented eroded pyramids. The up-close pictures make the formations look more like piles of rocky rubble. The largest one appears to have the ruins of a square building or walls on its summit, but it'll take a full-blown excavation to fully date the site.

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