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Ancient Civilizations - Academic Kids

Ancient Civilizations - Academic Kids | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Ancient history is from the period of time when writing and historical records first appear, roughly 5,500 years before the Birth of Christ. For some, the discovery of agriculture, roughly 6,000 BC is the beginning of ancient history. The most common date for an end of ancient history inEuropeis AD 476 (the fall of theWestern Roman Empire), however the exact date is still disputed among various historians. InEuropeancient history was followed by Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.


Via David Walp
David Connolly's insight:

nice and easy guide to the past for beginners

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elizama ramirez's curator insight, January 17, 10:19 PM

There is a period of time where writting and other historical events appeared. These discoveries are approximately from the BC era. In the Middle Ages, history became to be more noticed or investigated. 

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The real 'Google pyramids' revealed

The real 'Google pyramids' revealed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The place that went viral last month as the potential site of a mysterious Egyptian pyramid looks more like a series of mounds on the surface of Mars when you see it up close.

The site has been familiar to Egyptologists since the 1920s: It's thought to have been the locale for a desert settlement going back to Egypt's Ptolemaic era, when Greek and Roman influences were on the ascendance. Did these mounds serve as watchtowers, or tombs, or well sites? That's what the Soknopaiou Nesos Project wants to find out.

Egyptologist Paola Davoli of Italy's University of Salento in Leccefrom the project has also been in touch with Angela Micol, the North Carolina researcher who turned the spotlight on Dimai last month via her Google Earth Anomalies website.

 

Based on the satellite imagery, Micol imained that the mounds represented eroded pyramids. The up-close pictures make the formations look more like piles of rocky rubble. The largest one appears to have the ruins of a square building or walls on its summit, but it'll take a full-blown excavation to fully date the site.

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Egyptology News: Amarna Fund Raising - the Big Give Christmas Challenge

Egyptology News: Amarna Fund Raising - the Big Give Christmas Challenge | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

JustGiving appeal to raise money for the next stage of the conservation of the Amarna Period coffins from the recent excavations has reached its target. The conservators will resume their work at Amarna in the latter part of the year.

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Severed Hands Discovered in Ancient Egypt Palace

Severed Hands Discovered in Ancient Egypt Palace | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

This is first physical evidence of a grisly practice during ancient war.

The archaeologists have unearthed the skeletal remains of 16 human hands buried in four pits in Egypt.

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Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt

Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The discovery of a 3,550-year-old child’s sarcophagus near the southern Egyptian city of Luxor could shed light on a little-known period of Ancient Egypt, Jose Manuel Galan, the head of a Spanish team of archaeologists that made the find, told Efe on Wednesday.

Experts who for the past three years have explored the vicinity of the tombs of Djehuty and Hery, two high-ranking dignitaries of the Egyptian court between 1500 and 1450 B.C., discovered the intact funeral receptacle lying unprotected on the ground a few days ago.

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Nice find 

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'Google Earth pyramids' revisited

'Google Earth pyramids' revisited | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Remember that researcher who thought she spotted previously undiscovered Egyptian pyramids in Google Earth imagery? It turns out that there really are some ruins in the picture, but they’re not pyramids.

Well that settles this earth mystery.

What is needed is the ability to see what is already known. This can come from a lack of knowledge about how to find the information but also from a lack of collation or publishing of the information in the first place. Both as bad.

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Andrew Nayyar's curator insight, February 20, 6:22 PM

This article brings some fresh questions in regards to pyramids which is truely something special. The article presents google images that sugges old pyramids that were left without ruins in the present day Egyptian town called Daimyo. Investogators have confirmed that these are not pyramids but rather triangular mounds of dirt with a structure underneath. The usuage of these mounds is still unclear. It is possible that these formations are a result of natural erosion as this is common in the region. 

Rowena ButedHIST1014's curator insight, February 21, 4:06 PM

Another form of searching for the uncovered Egyptian pyramids would be through Google earth images. The images are taken of Dimai, which was known as Soknopaiou Nesos during the Greco-Roman period in Egypt. This is interesting to see such high technology to research upon great history.

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Great Pyramid Mystery to Be Solved by Hidden Room?

Great Pyramid Mystery to Be Solved by Hidden Room? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A sealed space in Egypt's Great Pyramid may help solve a centuries-old mystery: How did the ancient Egyptians move two million 2.5-ton blocks to build the ancient wonder?

Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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