Archaeology News
Follow
Find tag "archaeology"
104.0K views | +1 today
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Skyscapes and Landscapes in Prehistoric Scotland

Skyscapes and Landscapes in Prehistoric Scotland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Focusing on the earliest periods of intensive monument building in prehistoric Scotland (3000–1000BC ), this study identifies how humans chose and made places that were important to them
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Free online course explores Hadrian's Wall - Press Office - Newcastle University

Free online course explores Hadrian's Wall - Press Office - Newcastle University | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
David Connolly's insight:
Newcastle University is bringing learners around the world to Hadrian’s Wall with its first ever free online course on the FutureLearn social learning platform. 

The six-week course, entitled ‘Hadrian’s Wall: life on the Roman frontier’, offers a comprehensive introduction to the most heavily fortified frontier in the Roman Empire, its people and their lives, and raises fascinating issues concerning colonisation, cultural transformation, immigration, integration and imperialism.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Workmen find Georgian artefacts at old hospital - Top stories - Scotsman.com

Workmen find Georgian artefacts at old hospital - Top stories - Scotsman.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered a slice of Georgian history on the former site of the Royal Infirmary hospital.

 

Pottery, bits of bottle, coins and buttons from the 18th century were found by workers at what is now Edinburgh University’s High School Yards.

 

A dig took place after contractors drafted in to lay utilities uncovered a series of outer walls from the old royal’s Surgical Hospital, which was built on the site in 1738. Among the highlights was a sixpenny piece dating from 1816 and the reign of George IV.

David Connolly's insight:

Great story,  Jake is a lovely man from AOC Archaeology.   Plus i am from Edinburgh.  What is not to like! 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Photo Essay: Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account)

Photo Essay:  Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Turkey is an archaeologist's dream. Not only does it offer amazing Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Byzantium, and Ottoman ruins, it also offers yet un-explored sites for those interested in archaeology.
David Connolly's insight:

If you ever ever get a chance to go to Turkey!   -  Just go!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Fort Vancouver Public Archaeology

Fort Vancouver Public Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The use of information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized archaeological mapping, image recording, and analysis through tools such as GPS, GIS, and digital cameras (Evans and Daly 2006). Gidding et al. (2011) note that archaeologists have been slow to adopt integrated digital recording techniques, relying to an inordinate degree on paper-based recording systems to collect data on archaeological phenomena.


Where archaeologists have utilized digital data, the resultant databases often can answer only very specific research questions (Gidding et al. 2011).


That the challenges of using ICT field collection are becoming less of an issue is evidenced by the recent session at the 2012 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference titled “Using tablet PCs to support field documentation

David Connolly's insight:

THis is going the be the way forward, but there will always always be a place for the pencil, tape and notebook  ( well   for now anyway! )

more...
Martin Roseveare's comment, January 30, 2013 11:46 AM
We've just built a proper integrated recording system for a project in Iraq (http://www.urarchaeology.org/). It does need proper ground-up design and a complete move away from the file-full-of-paper mindset to be properly useful
David Connolly's comment, January 30, 2013 4:03 PM
Superb! Martin... you of course have made me jealous. This calls for a short article I think!
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Historical mapping project nears completion

Historical mapping project nears completion | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A 40-YEAR research project to map York’s historic past is finally nearing completion.

A series of maps showing how the city developed from Roman times to the present day is set to be published, along with essays by leading academics.

Dr Peter Addyman, chairman of York Civic Trust, had the idea of creating the cartographic study of the city’s development when he founded York Archaeological Trust in 1972.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Where Did Curry Come From?

Where Did Curry Come From? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
What is curry? Today, the word describes a bewildering number of spicy vegetable and meat stews from places as far-flung as the Indian subcontinent, the South Pacific, and the Caribbean Islands.

 

But the original curry predates Europeans’ presence in India by about 4,000 years. Villagers living at the height of the Indus civilization used three key curry ingredients—ginger, garlic, and turmeric—in their cooking. This proto-curry, in fact, was eaten long before Arab, Chinese, Indian, and European traders plied the oceans in the past thousand years.

David Connolly's insight:

Harrapan Curry recipes to follow  :)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Over-development 'destroys' fragile and precious heritage

Over-development 'destroys'   fragile and precious heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The drive to build new roads, housing estates, industrial units and retail parks is having a devastating effect on some of Cornwall's most important historic sites, say campaigners.Plans to move the...
more...
David Connolly's comment, January 28, 2013 4:37 AM
cornwall, heritage, archaeology
Rescooped by David Connolly from Digital Speak
Scoop.it!

Galen and UNC Wilmington Partner for Public Archaeology Education

Galen and UNC Wilmington Partner for Public Archaeology Education | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Cayo's Galen University is partnering with the University of North Carolina at Wilmington for a Public Archaeology Education Program.

 

"The partnership is a public education program geared towards young minds to enlighten and introduce them to the field of Archaeology and Anthropology and encourage them to consider those studies for their future as well as to educate them about the importance of studying our history and preserving archaeological sites for future generations.  Dr. Scott Simmons of UNCW along with archaeology students Victor Cucul and Ismael Teul of Galen University served as “Ambassadors of the Past”, visiting the various schools on Ambergris Caye and talking about the history and culture of past civilizations, specifically the Maya, who were the original inhabitants of this entire region and whose impact and civilizations are still evident today."


Via Best of Cayo, Sally McHugh
David Connolly's insight:

Partnership and education!  

the way forward

more...
David Connolly's comment, January 2, 2013 6:30 AM
Ah ... this is exactly the sort of archaeology I love the best!
Rescooped by David Connolly from Maya Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Thwarted Maya Comeback?

Climate Change Thwarted Maya Comeback? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Much has been made of the so-called 2012 Mayan apocalypse. But for the real Maya people, the end of the world came slowly and timed with historic droughts.

A new, ultra-detailed climate record from a cave in Belize reveals Classic Maya civilization collapsed over centuries as rain dried up, disrupting agriculture and causing instability that led to wars and the crumbling of large cities. A final major drought after the political collapse of the Maya may be what kept the civilization from bouncing back.


Via BelizeNet.com, Maya Research Program
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ceramic Fragments Point to Ice Age Artistry

Ceramic Fragments Point to Ice Age Artistry | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A trove of fragments of fired clay found in a cave in Croatia suggest that humans of the ice age made ceramic art more regularly than believed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ancient Tomb Built to Flood—Sheds Light on Peru Water Cult? National Geographic News

Ancient Tomb Built to Flood—Sheds Light on Peru Water Cult? National Geographic News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists in Peru thought they had discovered something special when they uncovered the tomb of a pre-Inca priestess and eight other corpses in 2011. But an even bigger find was right beneath their feet.

 

Continuing their search for artifacts a year later, the team dug beneath the priestess, uncovering a basement tomb they believe was built by an ancient water cult and meant to flood.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Historic 'Mike’s Cabin' Burns in Cave Canyon Fire

Historic 'Mike’s Cabin' Burns in Cave Canyon Fire | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
WHISKEY SPRINGS • Eighty years ago, Mike built a cabin.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Wearable submarine to hunt for 2000-year-old computer - tech - 04 June 2014 - New Scientist

Wearable submarine to hunt for 2000-year-old computer - tech - 04 June 2014 - New Scientist | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Like an underwater Iron Man, a diver will fly around the wreck of an ancient Greek ship later this year, looking to shed light on the Antikythera mechanism
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis

35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

At least 35 small pyramids, along with graves, have been discovered clustered closely together at a site called Sedeinga in Sudan.

 

Discovered between 2009 and 2012, researchers are surprised at how densely the pyramids are concentrated.

 

They date back to a time when a kingdom named Kush flourished in Sudan. Kush shared a border with Egypt and, later on, the Roman Empire. The desire of the kingdom's people to build pyramids was apparently influenced by Egyptian funerary architecture.

 

Because it lasted for hundreds of years they built more, more, more pyramids and after centuries they started to fill all the spaces that were still available in the necropolis." [See Photos of the Newly Discovered Pyramids]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt

Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The discovery of a 3,550-year-old child’s sarcophagus near the southern Egyptian city of Luxor could shed light on a little-known period of Ancient Egypt, Jose Manuel Galan, the head of a Spanish team of archaeologists that made the find, told Efe on Wednesday.

Experts who for the past three years have explored the vicinity of the tombs of Djehuty and Hery, two high-ranking dignitaries of the Egyptian court between 1500 and 1450 B.C., discovered the intact funeral receptacle lying unprotected on the ground a few days ago.

David Connolly's insight:

Nice find 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Ancient worlds
Scoop.it!

Mi‘ilya: Evidence of an Early Crusader Settlement

Mi‘ilya: Evidence of an Early Crusader Settlement | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Fifty-six diagnostic sherds, dating to the Crusader period, were found in a pit. Most of them represent local Crusader types, with a few belonging to imported types.

Via Ancient World Apps
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Historic sites under threat | Herald Scotland

Historic sites under threat | Herald Scotland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The University of the Highlands and Islands and Orkney's community archaeologist, Julie Gibson, said: "Scotland has the longest coastline in Europe and, as a maritime nation, much of our heritage relates to the sea. Around Orkney, more than one thousand archaeological sites are threatened or are being actively damaged.

David Connolly's insight:

Too true!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

World Heritage Sites Attacked During War

Discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites, which have been attacked during wars. We show the Sites before war, and where possible, what they looked after being attacked & how UNESCO has helped to resto...
David Connolly's insight:

A remarkable testimony

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Tracing the ceramic route from China

Tracing the ceramic route from China | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In China, ‘West’ means not Europe, nor America, but India, says Chinese archaeology student Ran Zhang, who is in the capital city to study the Chinese ceramic s...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City

A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A Real-Life Indiana Jones Who Converted To Islam And Discovered An Ancient City @Worldcrunch Worldcrunch - Great stories from the world's best news sources
more...
David Connolly's comment, January 28, 2013 4:37 AM
petra, archaeology, jordan,
Rescooped by David Connolly from LiveLatin
Scoop.it!

Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved?

Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Collapses highlight "critical" situation, but site is "absolutely safe for tourists."

Last month, part of a major wall came tumbling down in Pompeii, the ancient Roman city frozen in time by a f...

Via Leggo Tung Lei, Olivia Jane
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Coin hoards and pottery bring new insights to an ancient Illyrian stronghold : Past Horizons Archaeology

Coin hoards and pottery bring new insights to an ancient Illyrian stronghold : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The ancient city of Rhizon (modern Risan in Montenegro), was a strongly fortified Illyrian town which functioned as a successful trading centre, occupying a sheltered position in the Bay of Kotor on the Adriatic.

 

Lying in the innermost portion of the bay, Rhizan was protected from the interior by inaccessible limestone cliffs of the Orjen mountain, the highest range of eastern Adriatic, and through several narrow straits in the Bay of Kotor from the open sea.Image: Wikimedia commons

 

A stronghold of an Illyrian Queen

 

Ancient Rhizon was also a political centre for the Illyrians and it was here that Teuta, Queen of the Ardiaei tribe, established her capital.

After negotiations broke down between Teuta and the Romans (who requested her to put and end to piracy in the Adriatic), the First Illyrian War broke out in 229 BC. However, the Illyrians could not withstand the might of Rome and the war was a short lived affair.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Anthropology and Archaeology
Scoop.it!

Did Zombies Roam Medieval Ireland? : Discovery News

Did Zombies Roam Medieval Ireland? : Discovery News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Two 8th-century skeletons with stones shoved in their mouths suggest that the people of the time thought so.

Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The real 'Google pyramids' revealed

The real 'Google pyramids' revealed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The place that went viral last month as the potential site of a mysterious Egyptian pyramid looks more like a series of mounds on the surface of Mars when you see it up close.

The site has been familiar to Egyptologists since the 1920s: It's thought to have been the locale for a desert settlement going back to Egypt's Ptolemaic era, when Greek and Roman influences were on the ascendance. Did these mounds serve as watchtowers, or tombs, or well sites? That's what the Soknopaiou Nesos Project wants to find out.

Egyptologist Paola Davoli of Italy's University of Salento in Leccefrom the project has also been in touch with Angela Micol, the North Carolina researcher who turned the spotlight on Dimai last month via her Google Earth Anomalies website.

 

Based on the satellite imagery, Micol imained that the mounds represented eroded pyramids. The up-close pictures make the formations look more like piles of rocky rubble. The largest one appears to have the ruins of a square building or walls on its summit, but it'll take a full-blown excavation to fully date the site.

more...
No comment yet.