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longbow shoot

longbow shoot | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

longbow shoot...
I love all of Hans Splinters work.   however.   the details he captures at Archaeon are wonderful!

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Archaeologists probe police HQ for Bannockburn and Roman remains | Herald Scotland

Archaeologists probe police HQ for Bannockburn and Roman remains | Herald Scotland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it


Experts believe they are located at Central Scotland Police headquarters in Randolphfield, Stirling. Archaeologists from Stirling Council believe the land is of historical importance.

 

A geophysical survey is being carried out over an area surrounding two standing stones in front of the building. The stones are said to commemorate or may have been used in a skirmish during the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314.

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Near-Intact Roman Ship Holds Jars of Food : Discovery News

Near-Intact Roman Ship Holds Jars of Food : Discovery News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Italian police divers have discovered an almost intact Roman ship in the sea, buried in mud that has preserved the food inside its jars.

 

The ship, a navis oneraria, or merchant vessel, was located at a depth of about 200 feet thanks to a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) following tips from fishermen who had caught some jars in their nets.

 

Test on some of the recovered jars revealed they contained pickled fish, grain, wine and oil. The foodstuffs were traded in Spain for other goods.

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MoD digs for funds to save historic Dreghorn trenches - Latest news - Scotsman.com

MoD digs for funds to save historic Dreghorn trenches - Latest news - Scotsman.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

CAMPAIGN to save Edinburgh’s historical trenches from being lost forever has been given a boost after the Ministry of Defence confirmed it is actively seeking funding to preserve them.A network of trenches at Dreghorn Woods, Colinton, which it is estimated would cost around £10,000 to save, could soon disappear as they become overgrown by trees.

 

But MoD archaeologist Philip Abramson, who visited the trenches, which were used to train troops before they went to the battlefront, has said they are “not under threat”.

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Remnants of 200-meter Isonzo river Roman bridge discovered

Remnants of 200-meter Isonzo river Roman bridge discovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Remnants of 200-meter Isonzo river Roman bridge discovered, 9m by 4.5m pillar bases testament to size.

for Archaeology Tools http://www.pasthorizonstools.com


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Time Team programme visits Star Carr archaeological site - The Press, York

Time Team programme visits Star Carr archaeological site - The Press, York | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Team programme visits Star Carr archaeological site- Studies by archaeologists at the University of York have been put under the TV spotlight.

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Large Roman mosaic uncovered in Turkey : Past Horizons Archaeology

Large Roman mosaic uncovered in Turkey : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Part of a huge mosaic pavement has been uncovered in southern Turkey by archaeologists and students from a University of Nebraska-Lincoln, led by Professor of Art History Michael Hoff.

 

“This is very possibly the largest Roman mosaic found in the region,” Hoff said.

 

Hoff’s team has been excavating the remains of the ancient city of Antiochia ad Cragum on the southern Turkish coast since 2005 as part of a long term project.

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Mystery of King Tut's Death Solved?

Mystery of King Tut's Death Solved? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The mystery of King Tut’s death might finally be solved, according to one scientist who argues that the secret to the young Pharaohs demise is hidden in plain sight.

 

Dr. Hutan Ashrafian, a lecturer and surgeon at the Imperial College London, says the key to the mystery lies in the art of the time, which depicted King Tut with highly feminine features, including enlarged breasts.

 

The enlarged breasts, he argues, are indicative of a condition known as gynecomastia, which, when added to a host of historical and familial evidence, indicates that Tutankhamun might have suffered and eventually died from temporal lobe epilepsy.

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Archaeology and Shakespeare: London, Leicester and Stratford | The Shakespeare blog

Archaeology and Shakespeare: London, Leicester and Stratford | The Shakespeare blog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A new book by Julian Bowsher, Shakespeare’s London Theatreland, tells the story of the buildings and how they have been found. The organisation for which he works, Museum of London Archaeology, has done amazing work in rediscovering these lost buildings. Bowsher joined MOLA as a professional archaeologist in the mid 1980s and the first major discovery, the Rose Theatre, was made in 1989. He is now a specialist in the archaeology of the Tudor and Stuart periods and the book is written from the unique perspective of his personal experience.It’s not just a series of dry reports, but a beautifully-illustrated and engaging account of the subject from a number of different angles. Inevitably the main focus is on the excavations and what they tell us about the buildings. Photographs of excavations can be difficult to interpet, but not here, with important details marked with superimposed dotted lines. The excellent plans, reconstructions and photographs, all in colour, really make you understand what you’re looking at.

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Nag on the Lake: Wound Man, c.1400s

Nag on the Lake: Wound Man, c.1400s | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

“Wound Man" is an illustration which first appeared in European surgical texts in the Middle Ages. It laid out schematically the various wounds a person might suffer in battle or in accidents”

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Do you dig Connecticut history? - TheDay.com

Do you dig Connecticut history? - TheDay.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Do you dig Connecticut history?TheDay.comThe Connecticut State Museum of Natural History will hold an archaeology field workshop on Saturday, Sept. 29, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
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Sherlock homes in on clues left at Loftus by the Romans

Sherlock homes in on clues left at Loftus by the Romans | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

AN archaeologist has unearthed a Roman villa close to where he found a buried Saxon princess five years ago.

The newly-discovered site, dating back to about 370AD, belonged to an important Romano-British chieftain.

Two rooms have already been excavated by archaeologist Steve Sherlock, who discovered priceless Saxon princess jewels and artefacts in 2007.

He says there are perhaps 20 more rooms still to be uncovered at the site in Loftus , near Redcar , east Cleveland.

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Drill, Acid Taken To Aboriginal Petroglyphs in Southern Alberta

Drill, Acid Taken To Aboriginal Petroglyphs in Southern Alberta | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Irreplaceable and ancient Aboriginal etchings destroyed in southern Alberta, met their end recently by acid and power drill, reports state.

n an article published by the Pincher Creek Voice, the man who discovered that the ancient Aboriginal pictograms and petroglyphs on a southern Alberta erratic rock face had been destroyed through acid burns, power-washing and drilling, equated the destruction of the ancient Alberta writings to some of the worst cases of cultural crimes in recent history.

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The 5 Most Amazing Feats Of Ancient Engineering

The 5 Most Amazing Feats Of Ancient Engineering | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Want to build your own pyramid? How about some rice terraces? Sure, you could use some fancy modern equipment and take the easy way out... Or you could only use the tools available to those in times like 2500 B.C.
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'Oldest living thing on earth' discovered

'Oldest living thing on earth' discovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Ancient patches of a giant seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea are now considered the oldest living organism on Earth after scientists dated them as up to 200,000 years old.


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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Paperless Archaeology

Paperless Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

This blog is focused on the creation, curation, and publication of entirely digital content from archaeological excavations. Most of the examples come from work done for PARP:PS (Pompeii Archaeological Research Project: Porta Stabia).

 

Having access to the PARP:PS database was invaluable when developing the Sangro Valley Project’s database and paperless workflow (see my first post for an overview and this post for more background information). In that sprit of cooperation I have made available an unlocked version of the database originally developed for the SVP. The database – which we have dubbed “Cera,” the Latin word for a wax writing tablet – can be downloaded here (see licensing below and in the ReadMe file that comes with the database).

 

 

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Skilled hunters 300,000 years ago : Past Horizons Archaeology

Skilled hunters 300,000 years ago : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen in Germany have found eight extremely well-preserved spears – an astonishing 300,000 years old, making them the oldest known weapons anywhere.

The spears and other artefacts as well as animal remains found at the site demonstrate that their users were highly skilled craftsmen and hunters, well adapted to their environment – with a capacity for abstract thought and complex planning comparable to our own. It is likely that they were members of the species Homo heidelbergensis, although no human remains have yet been found at the site.

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Environmental Archaeology and the Roman Fen Edge « Access ...

Environmental Archaeology and the Roman Fen Edge « Access ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Fen Edge Archaeology Group (FEAG) are hosting a talk about how archaeobotany – the study of archaeological plant remains – reveals both agriculture and aspects of society along the Roman fen-edge, with particular ...
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Hunting for the 1540s at Kirkhope Tower

Hunting for the 1540s at Kirkhope Tower | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
AN Ettrick Valley tower has been the focus of attention from archaeologists, hunting a unique preserved glimpse of what life was like in the Borders in the 1540s.

 

Lying hidden beneath the surrounding grounds of the A-listed 16th-century Kirkhope Tower, just outside Ettrickbridge, are believed to be some of the best preserved remains of what life was like in the early 16th century.

 

Although the tower has been extensively renovated by owner Peter Clarke since he and his late wife, Gillian, moved in back in the 1990s, the structures that once existed around the tower have lain buried and undisturbed for centuries.

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St. Anselm classics professor digs a little deeper, finds pyramids in Italy | New Hampshire NEWS04

St. Anselm classics professor digs a little deeper, finds pyramids in Italy | New Hampshire NEWS04 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Saint Anselm classics professor David George wasn't prepared for what he found on his visit to Italy in May, when his group discovered the first pyramids ever to be found under the city of Orvieto that date back to the 5th century BC.

Hmmm.... you decide whether the journalist has perhaps...  misunderstood the concept.  :)

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The Art of Chivalry: The Texts of the Talbot Shrewsbury Book - Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts

The Art of Chivalry: The Texts of the Talbot Shrewsbury Book - Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The stunning images in the Talbot Shrewsbury Book (Royal MS 15 E. vi) are not the only treasure hidden between its covers (see our earlier post about the manuscript). Its contents are a unique collection of fifteen texts in French, compiled for a very important patron, the future Queen of England.

 

Their subjects range from history to romance to military strategy - the common theme throughout is the art of chivalry. This was a fitting subject for a military commander such as John Talbot, the 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, who commissioned the work and presented it to Margaret of Anjou, future wife of Henry VI, probably on her arrival in Rouen in March 1445 on her way to England.

 

Whether or not the young Margaret found the military manuals and statutes of the Order of the Garter as entertaining as the tales of Alexander and the romance of the Swan Knight, this was certainly a wedding gift to be treasured and passed on to future generations.

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Celtic tribe left Jersey coins

Celtic tribe left Jersey coins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An expert working on a hoard of Celtic coins found in Jersey says they were left by people running from Julius Caesar's army.
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Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: West Asian and North European admixture in Basques and Indo-Europeans

Dienekes’ Anthropology Blog: West Asian and North European admixture in Basques and Indo-Europeans | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In a previous post I showed that Basques are lacking in the West Asian admixture present in all their West European Indo-European neighbors, consistent with my theory of a late Indo-European invasion of Europe whose ultimate source was the highlands of West Asia.

 

But, there are alternative theories, one of which purports that the Proto-Indo-Europeans were northern Europeoid pastoralists from the eastern European steppe. Since the North_European ancestral component is lacking in the Tyrolean Iceman and Gok4, the TRB Swede, it is conceivable that North_European bearing populations introduced this component during the Indo-European invasion.

 

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Archaeologist in search of 'messy' history at Fort Boonesborough

Archaeologist in search of 'messy' history at Fort Boonesborough | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Lexington Herald LeaderTom Eblen: Archaeologist in search of 'messy' history at Fort BoonesboroughLexington Herald LeaderAdvertisement. Nancy O'Malley, a UK archaeologist, led a dig at Fort Boonesborough to learn more about the siege of 1778.
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