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Guide's Ilkley Moor archaeology insight - Bradford Telegraph and Argus

Guide's Ilkley Moor archaeology insight - Bradford Telegraph and Argus | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Guide's Ilkley Moor archaeology insightBradford Telegraph and ArgusLandmarks on the moor are among those in the 30-page guide published as part of the Watershed Landscape project.
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Restoring the Walls of Jerusalem – Biblical Archaeology Society

Restoring the Walls of Jerusalem – Biblical Archaeology Society | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Restoring the Walls of Jerusalem...
he walls of Jerusalem tell the tale of the city’s long history. The Hebrew Bible includes accounts of expansions in the early monarchy, and post-exile restoration work carried out by Nehemiah.* Later Herodian walls were destroyed in the 11th century C.E., and the 16th century walls built by the Ottoman Sultan Suleiman I still stand today. After a large-scale, five-year preservation project, the walls of Jerusalem have been restored to a splendor not seen in nearly 500 years.

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Traces of ‘Bali Kuna’ kingdom at Museum of Archeology

Traces of ‘Bali Kuna’ kingdom at Museum of Archeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Traces of human existence and culture from the pre-historic and historic eras in Bali can still be seen at the Museum of Archeology, also known as the Museum Gedung Arca, in Bedulu, near the Tampaksiring Palace in Gianyar regency.

 

The museum, which is next to the Bali Ancient Heritage Conservation Agency (Balai Pelestarian Peninggalan Purbakala Bali), is located in Bedulu village, about 30 kilometers from Denpasar and 15 minutes from Ubud, and stands between two rivers, Tukad Petanu and Tukad Pakerisan.

 

The villagers’ homes, the temples of Pusering Jagat, Penataran Sasih and Samuan Tiga, and the rice fields in Bedulu village and the nearby village of Pejeng are widely known as sites where various ancient Balinese artifacts have been unearthed.

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Bulgarian finance minister promises more funds after visit to Black Sea site – reports

Bulgarian finance minister promises more funds after visit to Black Sea site – reports | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Bulgarian Finance Minister Simeon Dyankov, after a visit to the Sinemorets site on the country’s Black Sea coast after the discovery two days before of a Thracian silver treasure, has said that funds for archaeological work in Bulgaria would be increased to 10 million leva (about five million euro) in 2013, Bulgarian-language media reports said.

 

Accompanied by Tsarevo mayor Georgi Lapchev, Dyankov – also one of Bulgaria’s deputy prime ministers – met the head of the archaeological excavation team, Professor Daniela Agre, and was briefed on the find that had been hidden near the vault wall near the tower at the site.

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Emergency meeting on saving Syria's heritage to be held Monday at Cairo University - Islamic - Heritage - Ahram Online

Emergency meeting on saving Syria's heritage to be held Monday at Cairo University - Islamic - Heritage - Ahram Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Emergency,meeting,on,saving,Syrias,heritage,to,be,held,Monday,at,Cairo,University,

 

Under the auspices of Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (ISESCO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) bureau in Egypt and Egypt’s Ministry of State for Antiquities, the Faculty of Archaeology at Cairo University is hosting an emergency meeting to discuss all possible measures to protect Syrian archaeological heritage presently subject to destruction amid the ongoing civil war in the country.

According to Mohamed Ibrahim, minister of state for antiquities, the meeting will discuss all possible efforts that could be exerted to stand against the destruction of Syria’s archaeological sites that date back more than 6000 years.

 

Dean of the Faculty of Archaeology Mohamed Hamza pointed out that archaeologists and Arab ambassadors who will attended the meeting will issue a statement condemning the destruction of Syrian archaeological sites, putting all the responsibility on the shoulders of the Syrian state for failing to protect such sites across Syria.

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Reading the Romans « British Museum blog

Reading the Romans « British Museum blog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
If you want to find some really vivid stories about ordinary ancient Romans – not just about the toffs, the generals, and the emperors – some of the very best places to look are their tombstones. These give some amazing ...

Via Paolo Barresi, Louise Zarmati
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Urartu palace unearthed

ARCHAEOLOGY - Urartu palace unearthed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The first palace structure from the Urartu Kingdom has been found in excavations at the top of Van Castle in the eastern province of Van.

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'Cult Fiction' Traced to Ancient Egypt Priest

'Cult Fiction' Traced to Ancient Egypt Priest | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Demotic text talks of ritual sex in the name of the Goddess Mut.

A recently deciphered Egyptian papyrus from around 1,900 years ago tells a fictional story that includes drinking, singing, feasting and ritual sex, all in the name of the goddess Mut.

 

Researchers believe that a priest wrote the blush-worthy tale, as a way to discuss controversial ritual sex acts with other priests.


oooh I say!

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2,000-year-old beef found in NW China

2,000-year-old beef found in NW China | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have confirmed that a black substance found in an ancient tomb in northwest China's Shaanxi province is actually a 2,000-year-old portion of beef.
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Noel Ruiz's comment, March 14, 2013 5:26 PM
Encuentran pedazo de carne en tumba china antigua de sobre 2,000 años .
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Romans wore socks and sandals

Romans wore socks and sandals | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ANCIENT Romans invented the infamous embarrassing dad look, say researchers...

 

One researcher said: "They may have shaped the world as we know it, but this just goes to show the Romans didn't have much style.

 

"Unfortunately they have inspired generations of embarrassing dads."

 

It is thought the military outpost, excavated as part of a £318million Highways Agency scheme to upgrade the A1 between Dishforth and Leeming, was used by the Roman Ninth Hispanic Legion.

 

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ottoman-era fortress to turn into museum in Skopje

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ottoman-era fortress to turn into museum in Skopje | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Cultural authorities in Skopje have announced plans to convert the Macedonian capital’s Ottoman-era fortress into a museum displaying pieces and artifacts stemming from the imperial age.

 

The project started earlier in September and is expected to be completed at the beginning of next year.

 

The fortress, regarded as one of the most important in the Balkans, is expected to be revived thanks to the new undertaking, Macedonia Cultural Heritage Protection Office Director Pasko Kuzman recently told Anatolia news agency.

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Matthew Ganibi's curator insight, November 9, 2013 3:23 AM

An article on a proposal to convert an Ottoman-era fortress into a museu in Skopje.

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Vatican paper L'Osservatore Romano weighs on 'Jesus' Wife' Coptic papyrus fragment: fake

Vatican paper L'Osservatore Romano weighs on 'Jesus' Wife' Coptic papyrus fragment: fake | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Vatican newspaper has added to the doubts surrounding Harvard University's claim that a 4th century Coptic papyrus fragment showed that some early Christians believed that Jesus was married, declaring it a "fake."

 

The newspaper, L'Osservatore Romano, published an article Thursday by leading Coptic scholar Alberto Camplani and an accompanying editorial by the newspaper's editor, Giovanni Maria Vian, an expert in early Christianity.

 

They both cited concerns expressed by other scholars about the fragment's authenticity and the fact that it was purchased on the market without a known archaeological provenance. "

 

At any rate, a fake," Vian entitled his editorial, which criticized Harvard for creating a "clamorous" media frenzy over the fragment by handing the scoop to two U.S. newspapers only to see "specialists immediately question it."

 

 

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singing brothers

singing brothers | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Singing brothers... from teh one and only Hanss Splinter at the Archeon Site. in the Netherlands.  

Han's images capture the past with such a realisim and casual reality that you are transported back in time -

Worth browsing his thousands of images

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Visiting Ancient Egypt, Virtually - New York Times

Visiting Ancient Egypt, Virtually - New York Times | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Visiting Ancient Egypt, VirtuallyNew York TimesCAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS — What do the pyramids of Giza in Ancient Egypt have in common with protesters using Twitter in modern-day Cairo?
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Archaeological finds bring Vietnam's history into focus

Archaeological finds bring Vietnam's history into focus | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Research at the caves in Ninh Binh has raised people's awareness of the value of local caves system.

 

Nearly 500 new findings of Stone Age, Metal Age and Cham Pa - Oc Eo civilisations at excavation sites throughout the country in the past year had made considerable contributions to building scientific files, planning preservation and bringing to light the country's relics and heritage, according to Prof Tong Trung Tin, rector of the Viet Nam Archaeology Institute at an annual workshop of the archaeological sector held here yesterday.

 

Among the discoveries, the finding of a system of caves, which were dwelling places for early peoples between 20,000 to 4,000 years ago at a Nature Heritage Site in Trang An in the northern province of Ninh Binh, was one of the most important findings, he said.

 

The finding would play a key factor for international experts to consider and support the file submission of the Trang An Tourism Complex Site to UNESCO for recognition as a World Heritage Site.

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The Beer Archaeologist

The Beer Archaeologist | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

By analyzing ancient pottery, Patrick McGovern is resurrecting the libations that fueled civilization...

It’s just after dawn at the Dogfish Head brewpub in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, where the ambition for the morning is to resurrect an Egyptian ale whose recipe dates back thousands of years.

 

But will the za’atar—a potent Middle Eastern spice mixture redolent of oregano—clobber the soft, floral flavor of the chamomile? And what about the dried doum-palm fruit, which has been giving off a worrisome fungusy scent ever since it was dropped in a brandy snifter of hot water and sampled as a tea?

“I want Dr. Pat to try this,” says Sam Calagione, Dogfish Head’s founder, frowning into his glass.

 

So what is the result?

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Coin hoards and pottery bring new insights to an ancient Illyrian stronghold : Past Horizons Archaeology

Coin hoards and pottery bring new insights to an ancient Illyrian stronghold : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The ancient city of Rhizon (modern Risan in Montenegro), was a strongly fortified Illyrian town which functioned as a successful trading centre, occupying a sheltered position in the Bay of Kotor on the Adriatic.

 

Lying in the innermost portion of the bay, Rhizan was protected from the interior by inaccessible limestone cliffs of the Orjen mountain, the highest range of eastern Adriatic, and through several narrow straits in the Bay of Kotor from the open sea.Image: Wikimedia commons

 

A stronghold of an Illyrian Queen

 

Ancient Rhizon was also a political centre for the Illyrians and it was here that Teuta, Queen of the Ardiaei tribe, established her capital.

After negotiations broke down between Teuta and the Romans (who requested her to put and end to piracy in the Adriatic), the First Illyrian War broke out in 229 BC. However, the Illyrians could not withstand the might of Rome and the war was a short lived affair.

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Fire Sweeps Through Aleppo’s 17th-Century Souk

Fire Sweeps Through Aleppo’s 17th-Century Souk | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A vast and well-preserved labyrinth of storehouses, schools and courtyards in Aleppo was damaged on Saturday as fierce clashes between security forces and insurgents continued.

For many residents, the old city, with the souk at its center, is the soul of Aleppo, one of the world’s oldest continuously inhabited cities and Syria’s largest. Aleppo has been staggering for months under a bloody battle that has reduced some residential areas to rubble, and with no deaths immediately reported from the blaze, the damage to the souk pales compared with the recent human toll.

 

For more on Aleppo's Old City:  http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/21

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Curator’s Diary 20/9/12: Ancient Egypt in Macclesfield

Curator’s Diary 20/9/12: Ancient Egypt in Macclesfield | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Amidst all the intense preparations for our Ancient Worlds re-display, a highlight of this week was a visit to the West Park Museum in Macclesfield – home to almost 500 ancient Egyptian and S...


Via Rene Nieuwenhuizen
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The University of Birmingham ‘throws in the trowel’ – as College buries Archaeology!

Since the Times Higher Education ran a story on the 13th September 2012 highlighting the bullying tactics against academic staff employed by the University of Birmingham, the situation in the college of Arts and Law has worsened – considerably. Following a supposed consultation, the College have now presented the final results of the 2012 Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity (IAA) review; this would appear to be the first of a new wave of reviews held across the University. The review has displayed an unprecedented level of bias, unfairness and aggression throughout its implementation and from the outset the University has sought to justify large scale redundancies:

Over 15 proposed redundancies were announced today – 11 from Archaeology; this, following 7 years of mismanagement in the IAA by senior managers.All members of staff on research contracts in Archaeology (responsible for several high impact, media friendly research projects internationally, including the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, North Sea Palaeolandscapes Project, and Shakespeare Project among others) are targeted. Requests from the University and College Union (UCU) for an Equality and Impact Assessment regarding age and gender have been completely ignored.Senior managers have been rewarded for failures which led to the proposed closure of the department of Archaeology and the cutting of the undergraduate degree programme for Single Honours Archaeology.The University of Birmingham has refused to properly investigate a collective Grievance lodged by research staff against the Senior Management of the IAA.What impact will such massive cuts have on the University, on its students, on the research culture and on the whole student ‘experience’ – especially as a spate of such reviews is sweeping across the University?

The shockwaves are being felt throughout the University as a whole. There is an atmosphere of genuine fear amongst the staff as the University’s already heavy-handed management style turns vicious in its desperate attempt to rid itself of those it perceives as expendable. Throughout the process the College was adamant in its public statement that Archaeology would have a future at the University, however the results announced today of the IAA Consultation lay bare the truth: after the large scale redundancies, the few remaining senior Archaeologists will survive scattered amongst the various schools that formerly constituted the IAA, with the discipline of Archaeology continuing invisibly and ineffectually, only as a ‘virtual’ grouping.

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Is this western Europe’s first city? : Past Horizons Archaeology

Is this western Europe’s first city? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeological excavations carried out at the site of La Bastida (Totana, Murcia, in Spain) have exposed an imposing fortification system which is unique for its location and date. This discovery, together with all previous finds made in recent years, reaffirm that the site represents the most advanced ‘city’ settlement in western Europe in both political and military terms during the Bronze Age ca. 2,200 BCE. In terms of sophistication, it is comparable only to the Minoan civilisation of Crete.

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Excavation unearths Bronze Age cultures in Turkey

Excavation unearths Bronze Age cultures in Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavations at the Aslantepe tumulus near the central Anatolian city of Malatya have unearthed a large building containing two spearheads and a necklace, all of which appear to date to the early trans-Caucasian culture.

 

Excavation work continued this year on part of a structure in the southern portion of the tumulus that is believed to be the world’s first palace, the head of the Aslantepe excavations, Professor Marcella Frangipane of Rome’s La Sapienze University, told members of the press. Some other buildings found to the north of the palace in earlier phases of the excavation date from the Bronze Age, she said.

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Ancient Romans knew how to party: Five reasons behind their greatest legacy

Ancient Romans knew how to party: Five reasons behind their greatest legacy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Alongside such achievements as the aqueducts and roman numerals, the ancient people of what is now Italy made...
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abigail's curator insight, November 23, 2013 3:09 AM

as we gather information many times we tend to add or subtract from reality or from ancient history..we belive what we see in movies although it's exagerated to some point..we don't know if all the famous roman styles really happened and were true, but we go with evidence to prove that the romans were a bit crazy in all aspects..as how they loved their wine, and partying,

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The Amazing Mayan Ruins of El Mirador

The Amazing Mayan Ruins of El Mirador | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Ever since a dedicated team began working on the excavation and conservation of the area, El Mirador has shaken many preconceptions about it to the core.

 

The incredibly sophisticated architecture of El Mirador proves that the Maya were far more advanced, far earlier, than anyone could have imagined.

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State archaeologists dive into wreck site

State archaeologists dive into wreck site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

State underwater archaeologists headed out Tuesday in search of artifacts at the Queen Anne’s Revenge shipwreck in Beaufort Inlet.

This is the third week of an eight-week dive expedition to the shipwreck sailed and eventually run aground by the infamous 18th century British pirate Blackbeard.

While the ship was sunk off the coast of Fort Macon in 1718, it wasn’t until its discovery in 1996 that it began giving up secrets on the Golden Age of Piracy.

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