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State archaeologists dive into wreck site

State archaeologists dive into wreck site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

State underwater archaeologists headed out Tuesday in search of artifacts at the Queen Anne’s Revenge shipwreck in Beaufort Inlet.

This is the third week of an eight-week dive expedition to the shipwreck sailed and eventually run aground by the infamous 18th century British pirate Blackbeard.

While the ship was sunk off the coast of Fort Macon in 1718, it wasn’t until its discovery in 1996 that it began giving up secrets on the Golden Age of Piracy.

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Migration of ancient houses - People's Daily Online

Migration of ancient houses - People's Daily Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Wrapped in a modern house with its façade decorated with huge glass windows, a typical ancient house with 220 years of history has found a new lease of life in downtown Beijing, more than 1,000 kilometers away from its origins in Jiangxi Province, adjacent to Anhui Province.

Mixing a modern flavor with traditional Huizhou architecture dating back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), the building has become a very popular restaurant called Le Quai.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Signs of earthquake revealed in excavation

ARCHAEOLOGY - Signs of earthquake revealed in excavation | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Signs of a Byzantine-era earthquake have been discovered in the ancient city of Soloi Pompeiopolis in the southern province of Mersin.

The excavation team found signs of an earthquake during excavations on the city’s Milli Egemenlik Street, according to the project head, Professor Remzi Yağcı of Dokuz Eylül University. “We have found three big, half-broken cubes, Roman and Byzantine coins and a big structure. We think that this structure was ruined by an earthquake in the early Byzantine period. Its real function will be understood after future excavations. This is the second structure we have discovered that was ruined in a big earthquake in Pompeiopolis. It is an important historical finding to understand the Anatolian earthquake,” he said.

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Oldest cave art in UK discovered and vandalized

Oldest cave art in UK discovered and vandalized | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A design of a reindeer hidden in the back of a Welsh cave may be the oldest cave art in the UK, archaeologists say.  but...........   


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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And you thought Pompeii's volcano was bad news?

And you thought Pompeii's volcano was bad news? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Two years ago, when the 2,000-year-old School of Gladiators collapsed, taking with it some of the finest frescoes of the early Roman era, Italy's president Georgio Napolitano spoke of a "national disgrace", and Silvio Berlusconi, the priapic greaser then serving as prime minister, promised to make more money available for conservation.

 

All that has happened is that the level of neglect has worsened, and funds are scarcer than ever. London's forthcoming blockbuster Pompeii exhibition may not deliver the same emotional wallop as a visit to the actual site, but at least the British Museum's roof is unlikely to land on your head.

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Archaeologists unearth temple structure and valuable artifacts in Southern Iraq

Archaeologists unearth temple structure and valuable artifacts in Southern Iraq | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Iraq, which the ancient Greeks called Mesopotamia or “land between two rivers” because of the Tigris and Euphrates, has always been regarded by archaeologists as the cradle of civilization.

 

Driven by the desire to reassemble some of the country’s lost history, a group of Iraqi archaeologists have recently managed to unearth artifacts and a Babylonian temple’s structure dating back to the middle Babylon period between 1532 BC to 1000 BC at an archaeological site in Iraq’s southern province of Nassiriya.

 

The site, excavated at 500 square meter at Abu Rabab plateau and located 150 km in east of Nassiriya city, is part of a project called “Gardens of Eden” which Iraqi government plans to launch over the next few years to promote tourism in the province.

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Andrew Nayyar's curator insight, January 17, 11:21 PM

This article is a great read as it explores the problems of preserving the past. In Mesoptamia's case their country (Iraq) has been invaded and destroyed. Their museums looted. Artifacts have been stolen and lost. Although this archeological find is amazing, the bitterness is that it may fall vicitm to a time and war. 

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Roman find changes view of strait

Roman find changes view of strait | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Gwynedd think they may have uncovered evidence of a Roman civilian settlement on the Menai Strait.
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient theater in center of city undergoing restoration process

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient theater in center of city undergoing restoration process | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Telmessos Ancient Theater in the Aegean Fethiye is a undergoing restoration process which kicked off on Sept 20 at a ceremony.

 

Restoration has begun at southwestern province of Muğla’s Fethiye district to revive the ancient theater at Telmessos.

 

“While Turkey is reviving many of its ancient sites, [Telmessos] has been neglected,” said Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay, who spoke at the Sept. 20 ceremony marking the start to renovations at the site. “[The theater’s] stones have even been removed and carried to the port. Now we will begin to bring it back to life.”

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Whose Heritage?

Whose Heritage? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

On 24 September, South Africans celebrate Heritage Day, during which they’re supposed to commemorate the rich and diverse cultural inheritance of the Rainbow Nation. That, at least, was the intention in 1996. Now, Heritage Day is a day of rallies and speeches organised by the government, or National Braai (Barbecue) Day – an initiative launched in 2007 to unite the nation in its shared enthusiasm for incinerating meat over wood fires.

 

Although there is something deeply ridiculous about a National Braai Day, there’s a logic in recasting Heritage Day into an uncomplicated, fun event which includes just about every South African. Not only did the then-Department of Arts, Culture, Science, and Technology include food as part of South Africa’s cultural heritage, but most South African cuisines include some form of barbecue. Everyone – from the middle classes in leafy suburbs, to township dwellers – can, and does, braai.

Read this fascinating article which wrestles the issue of Who has a right to claim heritage?

and an unusual and unexpected common goal. 

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Skeleton Found in England May Be of Richard III

Skeleton Found in England May Be of Richard III | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Supporters who believe Richard III’s reputation was smeared hope the potential discovery of his skeleton will lead to a reassessment of his brief but violent reign.
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Ancient site needs saving not destroying - CNN.com

Ancient site needs saving not destroying - CNN.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Documentary-maker Brent Huffman is battling to save from destruction an ancient Afghan Buddhist site, Mes Aynak, that sits on copper reserves.

This site is called Mes Aynak and is nothing short of awe-inspiring: a massive walled-in Buddhist city featuring massive temples, monasteries, and thousands of Buddhist statues that managed to survive looters and the Taliban. Holding a key position on the Silk Road, Mes Aynak was also an international hub for traders and pilgrims from all over Asia.

 

Hundreds of fragile manuscripts detailing daily life at the site are still yet to be excavated. Beneath the Buddhist dwellings is an even older yet-unearthed Bronze age site indicated by several recent archaeological findings.

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When Did Women Start Covering Their Breasts?

When Did Women Start Covering Their Breasts? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A French judge ordered the magazine Closer to turn over topless photos of Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, on Tuesday.

When did bare breasts become taboo in Western civilization?

 

Around 3,000 years ago women are displayed with exposed breasts in Minoan artwork from 1500 B.C.

 

Some historians believe that these ancient women went topless only during religious rituals—bare-breasted, buxom goddesses have been worshipped since the dawn of civilization—but some of the artworks depict everyday activities, suggesting that bare breasts may have been commonplace.

 

Just across the Mediterranean, ancient Egyptian women sported elaborate dresses that could either cover the breasts or leave them exposed, depending on the whim of the designer.

 

Over the next few centuries, however, breasts become strictly private parts. Ancient Athenian women were wearing flowing, multilayered robes that concealed the shape of the bosom by the middle of the first millennium B.C.

 

Spartan attire was more risqué, exposing the female thigh, but breasts were always covered.

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BOOKS - Articles on Troy gather in a book

BOOKS - Articles on Troy gather in a book | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
new book of articles on the ancient city of Troy in the northwestern province of Çanakkale retraces the city’s excavation and relationship with Anatolian culture.

Articles by the former head of excavations at Troy, German archaeologist Professor Manfred Osman Korfmann, have been collected in a book titled “Troia Rüzgarı” (Troy Wind), published in Turkish, English and German.

At a press conference held on Sept. 19 to promote the book, Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Archaeology Department member and the deputy head of Troy excavations, Professor Rüstem Aslan, said the articles in the book explained how the ancient city had been transformed from ruins into a tourism center, the excavation process and the city’s ties with Anatolia.

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singing brothers

singing brothers | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Singing brothers... from teh one and only Hanss Splinter at the Archeon Site. in the Netherlands.  

Han's images capture the past with such a realisim and casual reality that you are transported back in time -

Worth browsing his thousands of images

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Wales and Basque country work together to find origins of Newport's medieval ship

Wales and Basque country work together to find origins of Newport's medieval ship | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
SCIENTISTS and archaeologists from Wales and Spain could soon be working more closely thanks to “a major new finding” about the origins of the Newport Ship.

 

Hull timbers from the 15th century medieval vessel, found at the building site for the Riverfront Theatre in Newport ten years ago, have recently been matched to the Basque Country in northern Spain, renowned for its medieval ship-building industry.

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Twitter / KainedbutAble: Fresco of Diana the Huntress, ...

Fresco of Diana the Huntress, from the Hypogeum of Via Livenza, Rome #archaeology #art http://t.co/dYfMGf5k...
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Nazi Tibet statue from space rock

Nazi Tibet statue from space rock | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A THOUSAND-year-old Buddhist statue taken from Tibet in 1938 by an Nazi SS team was carved from a meteorite.
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SF City Hall ruins from 1906 quake found

SF City Hall ruins from 1906 quake found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Crews working on a building project in San Francisco's Civic Center have unearthed the massive foundations of the old City Hall, a ghostly reminder of San Francisco's greatest disaster.

 

The imposing old City Hall collapsed in a shower of bricks, stone and steel in the 1906 earthquake. It was the largest municipal building west of Chicago and was so elaborate it took 25 years to build. The City Hall was supposed to be earthquake proof, but it collapsed in seconds after the great quake struck. It had been open for less than 10 years.

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Artifacts offer ancient proof on Diaoyu Islands|Politics|chinadaily.com.cn

Artifacts offer ancient proof on Diaoyu Islands|Politics|chinadaily.com.cn | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
As the atmosphere between China and Japan remained tense over sovereignty of the Diaoyu Islands, an exhibition opened in Beijing on Monday that provides more solid evidence proving that the islands belong to China.
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First archaeology trail App launched in the Scottish Highlands : Past Horizons Archaeology

First archaeology trail App launched in the Scottish Highlands : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A community initiative has launched the first ever archaeology trail app for smartphones. Designed and produced by Ross and Cromarty Archaeological Services, the app guides visitors to and around six sites in and around the village of Strathpeffer, located in the Highlands of Scotland near Inverness.

 

Narrated and presented by Kirsty MacDonald, the Strathpeffer Archaeology Trail provides the user with video tours of the archaeological sites, spanning the Neolithic through to the Post Medieval period.

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HMR adopts three heritage structures

HMR adopts three heritage structures | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Hyderabad Metro Rail (HMR) Limited has announced the adoption of three important heritage structures of the capital - Paigah Tombs, MJ Market and the State Archeological Museum.

These heritage structures are to be restored to their past glory and in the process, contribute to the government’s efforts to promote Hyderabad as an important heritage tourist destination

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Excavation season ends at ancient Kibyra

Excavation season ends at ancient Kibyra | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The excavations of the ancient city of Kibyra in the southwestern province of Burdur, known for its history of gladiators, were completed last week. Şükrü Özdoğru, an archeologist working in the city, said they had found a new odeon, roads and mosaics in the city. The team also restored the ancient city’s walls and some of the buildings and excavated an ancient water system in the city, which shows the lifestyle of the society that lived there.

 

Kibyra (sometimes also spelled as Cibyra) is an ancient city and an archaeological site in south-west Turkey, near the actual town of Gölhisar, depending the province center of Burdur.

 

Possibly originally settled by Lydians, it is also the place where, according to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken among a multicultural population around his time (1st century BC), thus making Kibyra the last locality where the culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper according to extant accounts, is attested.

 

A tetrapolis (grouping of four cities) was formed under the leadership of Kibyra during the 2nd century BC. The Kibyran Tetrapolis included the neighboring cities of Bubon, Balbura and Oenoanda. The tetrapolis was dissolved by the Roman general Lucius Licinius Murena at the time of the First Mithridatic War.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Byzantine pigeon house architecture examined

ARCHAEOLOGY - Byzantine pigeon house architecture examined | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Byzantine Pigeon houses in the Ağırnas Valley in Central Anatolia are the focus of a recent research project carried out by a team of university lecturers and students. The study has started to yield results revealing a number of interesting things about the area

A study recently carried out at an old Byzantine settlement in the Central Anatolian province of Kayseri’s Ağırnas Valley has revealed that people attached great importance to growing pigeons and that the fertilizer obtained from the rock-carved pigeon houses were used in cereal production.

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The Appearing and Dissappearing Petroglyphs of Cape Alitak.

The Alutiiq Museum and Archaeological Repository and Wondervisions present the Cape Alitak Petroglyphs, a series of short vodcasts that explore Alutiiq heritage

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Russia: Princess of Ukok mummy returns to save Russia from major disaster | Mike Hitchen Online: i On Global Trends

Russia: Princess of Ukok mummy returns to save Russia from major disaster | Mike Hitchen Online: i On Global Trends | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
After 17 years of research, the famous "Princess of Ukok" returned to Russia's Altai on September 20. The armored sarcophagus with the remains of the mummy was flown from Novosibirsk by Mi-8 helicopter.

 

Scientific expedition under the chairmanship of Novosibirsk-based archaeologist Natalya Polosmak found the mummy in 1993. The ancient human remains were discovered in the burial mount of Scythian era on Ukok plateau, near the border with Mongolia, the Voice of Russia says. The mummy is more than 2.5 thousand years old.

 

Local shamans predicted that if the mummy is not returned by 2014, a terrible disaster would strike all of Russia. Noteworthy, the Altai region experienced quite a number of disasters during the time when the "princess" was away from her "homeland."

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