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Museum of Curiosity set to ignite wonder with collection of 'weird' objects | The Independent

Museum of Curiosity set to ignite wonder with collection of 'weird' objects | The Independent | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

“Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice. But in these days of rolling news, email overload and smartphone information onslaught, there’s not much to wonder about that can’t be slaked at the click of a button...


Via musée du quai Branly - Jacques Chirac
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The home front: Man builds 60ft-long World War I TRENCH in his back garden - and then invites history buffs round for re-enactment

The home front: Man builds 60ft-long World War I TRENCH in his back garden - and then invites history buffs round for re-enactment | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
It took Andrew Robertshaw (pictured) and a team of 30 volunteers a month to create the sprawling trench in his garden in Surrey.

 

Surrounded by barbed wire, sandbags and mud, this 60ft trench is barely distinguishable from those occupied by British soldiers fighting in the First World War almost a century ago.

 

The enormous dugout has been painstakingly recreated by an ex-history teacher in his back garden in Surrey, and the dedicated 55-year-old even spent 24 hours living in its confines with a team of volunteers as part of his efforts to experience life as a WWI soldier.

 

Andrew Robertshaw and 30 helpers spent a month shifting around 200 tonnes of earth to build the enormous three-room trench, which he hopes will teach people more about the horrific living conditions endured by British troops during the Great War.

 

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Mosaic found at a bazaar construction

ARCHAEOLOGY - Mosaic found at a bazaar construction | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A mosaic from the second or third century with a human figure has been found during the construction of a district bazaar area in the southern province of Mersin’s Tarsus district.

Tarsus Gov. Orhan Şefik Güldibi said the mosaic was unearthed by chance in the construction area.


“Maybe we have reached one of the most important archaeological remains in Tarsus.

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Historians pinpoint site of Revolutionary ambush

Historians pinpoint site of Revolutionary ambush | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
After six years of research, historians say they have pinpointed the site of Huck's Defeat — a skirmish in York County that set the stage for larger victories that turned the tide of the Revolutionary War against the British.

 

The precise location of the battle officially remained a mystery for more than a century until York County historian Michael Scoggins and a team of archaeologists explored a 10-acre patch of land in Historic Brattonsville. The Culture & Heritage Museums of York County announced the discovery in September.

 

History books can be updated to say that Huck's Defeat took place near the home of James Williamson, a settler who lived close to the present-day town of McConnells in southwestern York County, Scoggins said.

 

The discovery paves the way for a new, national historic site open to the public at the Brattonsville living history village, where Williamson's 18th century plantation and the Huck's Defeat battlefield are located.

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'Helmut' the mammoth found near Paris

'Helmut' the mammoth found near Paris | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

French archaeologists have uncovered a rare, near-complete skeleton of a mammoth in the countryside near Paris, alongside tiny fragments of flint tools suggesting the carcass may have been cut into by prehistoric hunters. 

 

The suggestion is this is clear evidence of interation between neanderthals and this large animal, which rather than being hunted and killed has been butchered after death.   They feel the cause of death is drowning.

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Urartu heritage protected

Urartu heritage protected | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Urartu inscriptions in Van Castle in the eastern province of Van, the center of the Urartu civilization, are set to become protected artifacts and be restored after years of vandalism.

 

he Van Relief and Monuments Provincial Directorate has applied to the Culture and Tourism Ministry to restore and protect officially ancient inscriptions in Van Castle.Van Castle is seven kilometers from the city center in the eastern province of Van, which had been the center of the Urartu Kingdom for three centuries. The inscriptions were discovered one by one and documented in a report submitted to the Culture and Tourism Ministry.

 

Speaking to Anatolia news agency, the Relief and Monuments Provincial Director Cemil Karabayram said the inscriptions, commisioned by the Urartu King Sarduri and depicting his journeys, had been damaged by people as well as attacks and visits over time.

 

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Springfield man admits taking bones from Civil War battlefield - KansasCity.com

A Springfield man who removed human remains from a southwest Missouri Civil War battlefield has agreed to pay restitution and perform community service to avoid federal prosecution.

Not something to be proud of!

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Arrests in Crete

Arrests in Crete | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The police in Crete seems to have had some success in retrieving stolen artefacts and arresting the culprits. Specifically, they arrested 8 men in Messara (Herakleion) last Thursday. T

 

Another breaking of antiquities ring

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Bolivia returns ancient mummy to Peru

Bolivia returns ancient mummy to Peru | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Bolivian authorities on Tuesday returned to Peru the ancient mummy of a young girl that was intercepted by police as it was about to be illegally shipped to France.The mummy, which dates from between the years 1200 and 1450, was discovered in October 2010 when a Bolivian citizen was attempting to send a box to the French city of Compiegne to be then presumably sent to an auction house, Peru's Ministry of Culture said in the statement.

 

When authorities opened the box they found the mummified remains of a girl approximately two years old in a fetal position. The child's body was wrapped in five layers of cotton and wool fabric, and experts said she likely lived among people who lived centuries ago on Peru's southern coast.

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Personal histories in archaeology: Division of Archaeology, University of Cambridge

Information about the seminar Personal Histories in Archaeology...

The Personal Histories Project is an on going, educational, oral-history research initiative founded by Pamela Jane Smith, of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, in which senior scientists are invited to share their memories and life stories. Through their personal recollections, we better understand the development of archaeology and the origins of current research agenda. The retrospective discussions introduce audiences to the enjoyable experience of listening to life histories as aural and visual sources are created. These sources are then combined with published literature and unpublished archives to enhance our understanding of twentieth-century science. Free DVDs are available to be used as teaching aids.

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Italian archaeologists find 2 sunken Roman ships off Turkey

Italian archaeologists find 2 sunken Roman ships off Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
wo ancient Roman shipwrecks, complete with their cargo, have been discovered by Italian archaeologists off the coast of Turkey near the the ancient Roman city of Elaiussa Sebaste. The ships, one dating from the Roman Imperial period and the other from about the sixth century AD, have been found with cargoes of amphorae and marble, say researchers from the Italian Archaeological Mission of Rome's University La Sapienza.
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Topofly: An Exploration into Low Altitude Aerial Photography for Heritage

Topofly: An Exploration into Low Altitude Aerial Photography for Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Low altitude aerial photography methods such as kite and pole photography have long been considered a valuable information gathering tool for archeologists. As well as the advantages of increased levels of detail, coverage and a huge reduction in cost, low-level views offer perspectives which are distinct from ground and aerial views but which take advantages from both.

This investigation aims to look into how these alternative image capturing methods sit within a modern context and how they can be applied to public interpretation as well as scientific analysis. In the following pages find my explorations into how data captured in this way can be processed, using photogrammetry for example, and used to create interpretative content. In the course of my MSc project I hope to understand better how data rich visualisations can portray not just factual information, but the surrounding atmospheres and stories associated with historical sites.

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Vandals admit muffin-crystal-thingie assault at Serpent Mound

Vandals admit muffin-crystal-thingie assault at Serpent Mound | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A group of “light warriors” buried what may be hundreds of small muffinlike resin objects, embedded with aluminum foil and quartz crystals, at Serpent Mound with the intent of realigning the energy of the ancient Native American site in Peebles.
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Dig uncovers Bronze Age arrowhead

Dig uncovers Bronze Age arrowhead | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An archaeology dig at a medieval nunnery in Oxford has unearthed a 4,000-year-old Bronze Age arrowhead.

 

The five-week dig by the Archaeology of East Oxford Community Project (Archeox) also revealed prehistoric worked flints, medieval and roman pottery.

 

The excavation at Littlemore Priory was a collaboration between volunteers and the University of Oxford.

 

More than 500 volunteers gave up their free time to take part in the project near the Kassam Stadium.

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The Caherduggan peytrel – a unique medieval find : Past Horizons Archaeology

The Caherduggan peytrel – a unique medieval find : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Excavations at the former site of Caherduggan Castle, Co. Cork, have revealed a preserved composite leather and metal object that may be a unique survival in Ireland and Britain.

 

The dig was carried out in 2011 by Rubicon Heritage Services on behalf of Cork County Council, as part of a road realignment planned between the villages of Newtwopothouse and Doneraile in the north of the county.

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Ancient Roman Giant Found—Oldest Complete Skeleton With Gigantism

Ancient Roman Giant Found—Oldest Complete Skeleton With Gigantism | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
It's no tall tale—the first complete ancient skeleton of a person with gigantism has been discovered near Rome, a new study says.

 

At 6 feet, 8 inches (202 centimeters) tall, the man would have been a giant in third-century A.D. Rome, where men averaged about 5 and a half feet (167 centimeters) tall. By contrast, today's tallest man measures 8 feet, 3 inches (251 centimeters).

Finding such skeletons is rare, because gigantism itself is extremely rare, today affecting about three people in a million worldwide. The condition begins in childhood, when a malfunctioning pituitary gland causes abnormally growth.

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LOOK: Ancient Thracian Gold Unearthed In Northern Bulgaria

LOOK: Ancient Thracian Gold Unearthed In Northern Bulgaria | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- Archaeologists say they have unearthed an almost 2,400-year-old golden hoard in an ancient Thracian tomb in northern Bulgaria.

 

The treasure was found on Thursday near the village of Sveshtari, 400 kilometers (250 miles) northeast of Sofia, team leader Diana Gergova said.

 

She said that among the artifacts, dating back to the end of the fourth or the beginning of the third century B.C., were gold jewelry and applications for horse trappings, a tiara with reliefs of lions and fantasy animals, as well as four bracelets and a ring.

 

The Thracians lived in what is now Bulgaria, and parts of modern Greece, Romania, Macedonia, and Turkey between 4,000 B.C. and the 7th century A.D., when they were assimilated by the invading Slavs.

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Despite Syrian war, archaeologists work at ancient city of Karkemish on Turkish side of border

Despite Syrian war, archaeologists work at ancient city of Karkemish on Turkish side of border | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ISTANBUL — Few archaeological sites seem as entwined with conflict, ancient and modern, as the city of Karkemish.

 

The scene of a battle mentioned in the Bible, it lies smack on the border between Turkey and Syria, where civil war rages today. Twenty-first century Turkish sentries occupy an acropolis dating back more than 5,000 years, and the ruins were recently demined. Visible from crumbling, earthen ramparts, a Syrian rebel flag flies in a town that regime forces fled just months ago.

 

Turkish-Italian team is conducting the most extensive excavations there in nearly a century, building on the work of British Museum teams that included T.E. Lawrence, the adventurer known as Lawrence of Arabia. The plan is to open the site along the Euphrates river to tourists in late 2014.

 

The strategic city, its importance long known to scholars because of references in ancient texts, was under the sway of Hittites and other imperial rulers and independent kings. However, archaeological investigation there was halted by World War I, and then by hostilities between Turkish nationalists and French colonizers from Syria who built machine gun nests in its ramparts.  until now

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Help save the cultural heritage of Afghanistan : Past Horizons Archaeology

Help save the cultural heritage of Afghanistan : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Brent Huffman, a documentary film-maker and professor at Northwestern University, USA, first visited the ancient Buddhist city of Mes Aynak in June of 2011 and immediately fell in love with the site. From that point onwards he has campaigned tirelessly to bring the plight of Mes Aynak into the public conciousness so that it can be saved for future generations of Afghans and the international community.

Do please read this...  think about it and donate if you can.   or tell others about it.

 

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Archaeologists examine one of the oldest hoards found in Europe : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeologists examine one of the oldest hoards found in Europe : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen’s Institute of Prehistory are working with the Serbian Archaeological Institute in Belgrade to analyse the most comprehensive Early Neolithic hoard ever found.

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Ancient Egyptian D20 the oldest in the world?

Ancient Egyptian D20 the oldest in the world? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Were the ancient Egyptians the inventors of Dungeons and Dragons?

well...  what do you think?

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Bringing history to light... - Institute of Nautical Archaeology

Bringing history to light... - Institute of Nautical Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The mission of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology is "to fill in the gaps of history and provide answers to challenging historical questions through the study and examination of the vessels that have traveled the world's waterways for millennia, carrying people and cargo, and making possible the widespread exchange of ideas, innovation and invention."

Lot to explore here, with projects ranging from Mongol Fleets to Pirate Ships. 

Choose the Our Blogs section to catch up with the latest.  !

 

 

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Architecture book reveals how Leeds’s Temple Mill has an ancient history - Top Stories - Yorkshire Evening Post

Architecture book reveals how Leeds’s Temple Mill has an ancient history - Top Stories - Yorkshire Evening Post | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The pyramids, the Sphinx...and Temple Mill? It’s an unlikely architectural connection.

It’s an unlikely architectural connection,

But a new book about the influence of ancient Egypt on British architecture over the past two centuries has revealed a Leeds link.

Among the cultural gems profiled is Temple Mill, also known as Marshall’s Mill, in Marshall Street, Holbeck.

The mill joins another West Yorkshire site, Bradford’s Undercliffe cemetery, in Egypt in England, a new book from English Heritage.

The book by Egyptologist Chris Elliott explores more than 50 public monuments in Britain, from cinemas and supermarkets to factories and mausoleums, revealing an on-going love affair between Britain and the land of the pharaohs.

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Archeological treasure under threat

Archeological treasure under threat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Kumi Dome in the Darb El Ahmar area in Old Cairo is one of Cairo’s archaeological treasures. Built in the 10th century in the Circassian Mamluk era, the dome is listed on the official map of the Ministry of Antiquities as antiquity number 256.

 

For a long time a protective fence ensured that the monument could be admired by anyone passing by yet would be protected from harm.

 

Recently the fence came down and instead of preserving the past, the area around the dome has turned into a place where garbage is dumped and unwanted possessions are discarded.

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Seventh century eclipse marked the end of temple site : Past Horizons Archaeology

Seventh century eclipse marked the end of temple site : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

During excavations at Pañhú, in Hidalgo Tecozautla, Mexico archaeologists uncovered a burned stucco floor. What they had found was evidence that the main pyramid had been deliberately ‘de-consecrated‘ and destroyed approximately 1350 years ago.

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