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Pre-Viking hotspot on the Norwegian Coast

Pre-Viking hotspot on the Norwegian Coast | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Kings took control of coastal maritime traffic in Norway as early as the third century, long before the Viking Age. Discoveries from the ancient royal residences offer new proof.
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Hadrian's Wall community archaeology event will probe legacy

Hadrian's Wall community archaeology event will probe legacy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
THE first major event will be staged tomorrow in an ambitious community archaeology project which will probe the legacy of Hadrian’s Wall.
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Airport x-ray scans reveal haul of new Bronze Age axeheads in pot found in Jersey field | Culture24

Airport x-ray scans reveal haul of new Bronze Age axeheads in pot found in Jersey field | Culture24 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Experts believe the weapons found in a pot in the area of Trinity last month may have been used as objects of prestige after finding a further 21 axeheads inside the vessel.
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Flint flake hints at mammoth butchery : Past Horizons Archaeology

Flint flake hints at mammoth butchery : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A nearly complete mammoth skeleton has just been uncovered at Changis-sur-Marne in the Seine-et-Marne department. This type of discovery, in its original context, is exceptional in France since only three specimens have been found in 150 years: the first such discovery, known as “the mammoth of Choulans”, was discovered in Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon in 1859.

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Ancient a cave a window to why the Mayan world came to an end

Ancient a cave a window to why the Mayan world came to an end | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
AS the Mayan calendar enters its final count-down, researchers are making inroads into understanding why the ancient American civilisation collapsed.
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Digging up scandalous nuns' past

Digging up scandalous nuns' past | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

UNCOVERING the history behind supposedly scandalous nuns has helped fuel interest in archaeology projects in Oxford.

About 500 volunteers from Archeox, the Archaeology of East Oxford Community Project, have been excavating a medieval nunnery at Minchery Farm Paddock, between Blackbird Leys and Littlemore.

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US returns Machu Picchu artefacts

US returns Machu Picchu artefacts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The US returns to Peru the last artefacts taken from Machu Picchu by archaeologist Hiram Bingham, who rediscovered the Inca citadel in 1911.

The last of the artefacts taken from Machu Picchu by American archaeologist who rediscovered the Inca citadel have been returned to Peru.

 

More than 35,000 pottery fragments and other pieces were flown from Yale University to the Andean city of Cusco.

 

They had been taken to the US by archaeologist Hiram Bingham, who brought the site to international attention in 1911.

 

The move completes a deal signed in 2010, following legal action by Peru.

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Researching the remains of the Spanish Civil War in Alicante : Past Horizons Archaeology

Researching the remains of the Spanish Civil War in Alicante : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The bunkers and other defence constructions built on the Alicante coast during the Spanish Civil War have been part of our landscape for years. The University of Alicante has collected information about 46 of these structures, which today form part of our historical and architectural heritage.

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Coral reveals exact date of human arrival in Tonga | ABC Radio Australia

Coral reveals exact date of human arrival in Tonga | ABC Radio Australia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Researchers have dated ancient coral tools in Tonga and pinned down the most precise date for human settlement of Polynesia yet.

 

"We've been able to date the founding population of Polynesia to within a very narrow window of 16 years," Prof Marshall Weisler, an archaeologist from the University of Queensland said.

 

Polynesia - which stretches from Hawaii in the north, New Zealand in the south and Easter Island in the east - is believed to be the last place on Earth to become inhabited by humans.

 

People known as Lapita were previously estimated to have arrived in Tonga sometime around 3,000 years ago.

 

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Bannockburn in 3D to mark 700th anniversary - Heritage - Scotsman.com

Bannockburn in 3D to mark 700th anniversary - Heritage - Scotsman.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
IT WILL capture the heat of battle without the gore. Visitors to the new Bannockburn centre will get the chance to unleash their inner bloodthirsty warrior on an interactive 3D battlefield, complete with rampaging soldiers and arrows flying overhead.

 

Scotland on Sunday has been given an exclusive preview of plans for the £9 million visitor centre that will be the focal point of celebrations to mark the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn during the 2014 Year of Homecoming.

 

Hollywood-style computer-generated imagery will allow visitors to experience what it would have felt like during the battle. They will be invited to learn sword-wielding moves before being let loose to deploy their own warrior tactics in a battlefield game.

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Language & Symbols | The Smithsonian

Language & Symbols | The Smithsonian | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

From pigments to printing presses, symbols changed the way humans lived and provided new ways to cope with an unpredictable world...


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Dig uncovers Bronze Age arrowhead

Dig uncovers Bronze Age arrowhead | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An archaeology dig at a medieval nunnery in Oxford has unearthed a 4,000-year-old Bronze Age arrowhead.

 

The five-week dig by the Archaeology of East Oxford Community Project (Archeox) also revealed prehistoric worked flints, medieval and roman pottery.

 

The excavation at Littlemore Priory was a collaboration between volunteers and the University of Oxford.

 

More than 500 volunteers gave up their free time to take part in the project near the Kassam Stadium.

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The Caherduggan peytrel – a unique medieval find : Past Horizons Archaeology

The Caherduggan peytrel – a unique medieval find : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Excavations at the former site of Caherduggan Castle, Co. Cork, have revealed a preserved composite leather and metal object that may be a unique survival in Ireland and Britain.

 

The dig was carried out in 2011 by Rubicon Heritage Services on behalf of Cork County Council, as part of a road realignment planned between the villages of Newtwopothouse and Doneraile in the north of the county.

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Elite Maya residencies occupied by both living and dead : Past Horizons Archaeology

Elite Maya residencies occupied by both living and dead : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Excavation of elite residences at Nojol Nah by archaeologists from the Maya Research Program in Belize, has yielded a large, well preserved skeletal sample – a minimum of 63 individuals found over a five year period including 25 in the 2012 season at El Palacio, a large elite double courtyard complex within the site and dating to the Late Terminal Classic (AD800 -900).

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Excavating a Roman Floor

Excavating a Roman Floor | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Not only have our archaeologists have been hard at work carefully excavating the heart of Roman Londinium, they’ve been given a chance to play with some new kit. And now we have a chance to t...
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Is the Harappan civilisation 2000 years older? : Past Horizons Archaeology

Is the Harappan civilisation 2000 years older? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The recent International Conference on Harappan Archaeology produced an unexpected announcement from archaeologists BR Mani and KN Dikshit, both of the Archaeological Survey of India, who claim that new dates from excavations show the Harappan culture began around 2000 years earlier than previously thought.

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Charlie Wittke's curator insight, February 6, 2014 4:33 PM

This looks like the most elaborate of all the scoops I'm going to get. It's got timelines, it's got pictures, it's got interpretations on how the Harappans disappeared.

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In search of Detroit's lost neighborhood

In search of Detroit's lost neighborhood | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In the shadow of Detroit's famous ruin, the Michigan Central Depot, this small group is excavating a former thriving neighborhood that once occupied the park and adjacent areas; in all, about 20 blocks of streets and alleys that ran from 15th to...
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A glimpse of teenage life in ancient Rome - Ray Laurence

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence

 

Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-year old living in Rome in 73 AD. His life is a typical one of arranged marriages, coming-of-age festivals, and communal baths. Take a look at this exquisitely detailed lesson on life of a typical Roman teenager two thousand years ago.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/a-glimpse-of-teenage-life-in-ancient-rome-ray-laurence

Welcome to the world of Lucius Popidius Secundus, a 17-year old living in Rome in 73 AD. His life is a typical one of arranged marriages, coming-of-age festivals, and communal baths. Take a look at this exquisitely detailed lesson on life of a typical Roman teenager two thousand years ago.

Lesson by Ray Laurence, animation by Cognitive Media.

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Marshall Shogun Dore's curator insight, May 5, 2013 9:11 AM

A light-hearted but informative video of a day in the life of a teenage Roman boy. Gives an interesting insight into the differences and similarities of ancient society to modern day life.

Amanda Chadwick's curator insight, August 20, 2014 10:15 PM

teenage life in ancient rome

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Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada

Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Telltale blade sharpeners may be smoking guns in the quest for the New World's second known Viking site.

 

or the past 50 years—since the discovery of a thousand-year-old Viking way station in Newfoundland—archaeologists and amateur historians have combed North America's east coast searching for traces of Viking visitors.It has been a long, fruitless quest, littered with bizarre claims and embarrassing failures. But at a conference in Canada earlier this month, archaeologist Patricia Sutherland announced new evidence that points strongly to the discovery of the second Viking outpost ever discovered in the Americas.

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New book to cast fresh light on Roman Winchester - This Is Hampshire

New book to cast fresh light on Roman Winchester - This Is Hampshire | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New book to cast fresh light on Roman WinchesterThis Is HampshireHelen Rees, curator of archaeology for Winchester Museums, said: “This kind of careful data collection and research is so useful for we curators, because it helps us to tell the story...
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CINEMA-TV - History runs through ancient channels

CINEMA-TV - History runs through ancient channels | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Koç University’s Research Center for Anatolian Civilizations is home to a new exhibition that delves into some of the greatest monuments in the history of Constantinople, Istanbul’s predecessor.


A new exhibition shines further light on the history of Istanbul, unraveling one of the biggest achievements in the history of Constantinople, the late Roman and Byzantine city.

 

The long title of the exhibition is “Waters for a Capital: Archaeological and Scientific Research into the Water Supply of Byzantine Constantinople / Istanbul,” and it uncovers some of the greatest monuments, sharing the history of the Hagia Sophia, the relics of the Hippodrome, and the walls overlooking the Bosphorus.

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Jordin Altmann's curator insight, September 19, 2013 6:58 PM

This is a place I would love to site see and very very interested in the structures and reasons for the roman styled buildings. It looks very interesting and worht traveling to see!

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Hopi warily welcome tourists to West's 'last secret land'

Hopi warily welcome tourists to West's 'last secret land' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Hopi reservation lays out the welcome mat with new tourist trail.

 

Micah Loma'omvaya is expertly dodging ruts on a narrow footpath-turned-wagon-trail-turned-barely-passable-road when he spots a rogue compact car with California plates parked off to the side.

 

Soon its day-pack-wearing occupants stroll into view."

 

They shouldn't be here without a guide," says Loma'omvaya, a Hopi anthropologist who also happens to be a guide. "This is a federal Indian reservation. We fought for it and we have a right to control tours in it."

 

Point taken. But as the wind-sculpted otherworldly beauty of Blue Canyon comes into view, it's understandable what tempted the trespassers — and what compelled

 

Sunset magazine to declare that if this spot weren't in what it dubbed the "The Last Secret Land," it'd be worthy of a starring role in a Ken Burns documentary.

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Archaeological site entwined with conflict - IOL SciTech

Archaeological site entwined with conflict - IOL SciTech | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Few archaeological sites seem as entwined with conflict, ancient and modern, as the city of Karkemish.The scene of a battle mentioned in the Bible, it lies smack on the border between Turkey and Syria, where civil war rages today. Twenty-first century Turkish sentries occupy an acropolis dating back more than 5,000 years, and the ruins were recently demined. Visible from crumbling, earthen ramparts, a Syrian rebel flag flies in a town that regime forces fled just months ago.

 

A Turkish-Italian team is conducting the most extensive excavations there in nearly a century, building on the work of British Museum teams that included T.E. Lawrence, the adventurer known as Lawrence of Arabia. The plan is to open the site along the Euphrates river to tourists in late 2014.

 

The strategic city, its importance long known to scholars because of references in ancient texts, was under the sway of Hittites and other imperial rulers and independent kings. However, archaeological investigation there was halted by World War I, and then by hostilities between Turkish nationalists and French colonizers from Syria who built machine gun nests in its ramparts. Part of the frontier was mined in the 1950s, and in later years, creating deadly obstacles to archaeological inquiry at a site symbolic of modern strife and intrigue.

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Museum of Curiosity set to ignite wonder with collection of 'weird' objects | The Independent

Museum of Curiosity set to ignite wonder with collection of 'weird' objects | The Independent | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

“Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice. But in these days of rolling news, email overload and smartphone information onslaught, there’s not much to wonder about that can’t be slaked at the click of a button...


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The home front: Man builds 60ft-long World War I TRENCH in his back garden - and then invites history buffs round for re-enactment

The home front: Man builds 60ft-long World War I TRENCH in his back garden - and then invites history buffs round for re-enactment | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
It took Andrew Robertshaw (pictured) and a team of 30 volunteers a month to create the sprawling trench in his garden in Surrey.

 

Surrounded by barbed wire, sandbags and mud, this 60ft trench is barely distinguishable from those occupied by British soldiers fighting in the First World War almost a century ago.

 

The enormous dugout has been painstakingly recreated by an ex-history teacher in his back garden in Surrey, and the dedicated 55-year-old even spent 24 hours living in its confines with a team of volunteers as part of his efforts to experience life as a WWI soldier.

 

Andrew Robertshaw and 30 helpers spent a month shifting around 200 tonnes of earth to build the enormous three-room trench, which he hopes will teach people more about the horrific living conditions endured by British troops during the Great War.

 

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