Archaeology News
Follow
Find
102.5K views | +39 today
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Crocodile Skin Suit of Armour ‘In ancient Egypt...

Crocodile Skin Suit of Armour ‘In ancient Egypt... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Crocodile Skin Suit of Armour ‘In ancient Egypt the crocodile was seen as sacred and divine, and worshipped as a god, so this suit might have been worn by priests of the crocodile sect .  from 3rd century AD

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

ARCHAEOLOGY - History of Hattuşa’s excavation on display

ARCHAEOLOGY - History of Hattuşa’s excavation on display | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Yapı Kredi Culture Center displays a photography documenting a century of archaeological excavations in the Hattuşa, situated in the northern province of Çorum. The exhibition features photographs drawn from German Archaeological Institute

 

The unpublished photographs that form the backbone of the show were gathered with the aim of painting a historical, ethnographical and sociological panorama of the whole excavations process from 1906 to 2012.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeology: Tomb in northern Greece could be that of widow and son of Alexander the Great, reports say

Archaeology: Tomb in northern Greece could be that of widow and son of Alexander the Great, reports say | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists are reserving judgment but Greek and Bulgarian media have reported that a tomb found in the town of Amphipolis in northern Greece could be that of Alexander the Great’s widow and his son, Roxana of Bactria and Alexander IV...

Archaeologists are reserving judgment but Greek and Bulgarian media have reported that a tomb found in the town of Amphipolis in northern Greece could be that of Alexander the Great’s widow and his son, Roxana of Bactria and Alexander IV Aegus.

 

Amphipolis is near Serres, a Greek town that Bulgarian media did not fail to point out is just 30km from the Bulgarian border.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

New archaeology museum at the University of South Alabama peers into the area's past.

New archaeology museum at the University of South Alabama peers into the area's past. | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The story of the last 14,000 years in Mobile will be on display at the new Archaeology Museum opening on the University of South Alabama campus.Culled from a university archaeological collection comprised of tens of thousands of artifacts, the museum highlights a past richer than most residents understand.

The rarest items in the museum date back more than 10,000 years, a collection of stone spear points used by the region’s earliest residents. Artifacts from that era are hard to come by because the area the Gulf’s first native peoples inhabited is now underwater.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Zeugma After the Flood - Archaeology Magazine

Zeugma After the Flood - Archaeology Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New excavations continue to tell the story of an ancient city at the crossroads between east and west...

It wasn't good policy that saved ancient Zeugma. It was a good story.

 

In 2000, the construction of the massive Birecik Dam on the Euphrates River, less than a mile from the site, began to flood the entire area in southern Turkey. Immediately, a ticking time-bomb narrative of the waters, which were rising an average of four inches per day for six months, brought Zeugma and its plight global fame. The water, which soon would engulf the archaeological remains, also brought increasing urgency to salvage efforts and emergency excavations that had already been taking place at the site, located about 500 miles from Istanbul, for almost a year.

 

The media attention Zeugma received attracted generous aid from both private and government sources.

 

Of particular concern was the removal of Zeugma's mosaics, some of the most extraordinary examples to survive from the ancient world. Soon the world's top restorers arrived from Italy to rescue them from the floodwaters.

 

The focus on Zeugma also brought great numbers of international tourists—and even more money—a trend that continues today with the opening in September 2011 of the ultramodern $30 million Zeugma Mosaic Museum in the nearby city of Gaziantep.

 

>>  Now read on about the continuing work.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archeologists: Assyrian site in northern Iraq unearthed

Archeologists: Assyrian site in northern Iraq unearthed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archeologists working in northern Iraq have discovered a new Assyrian site in the vicinity of the historic Arbil city center, the head of the antiquities office in the Kurdish Province of Arbil, Haydar Hassan, was quoted as saying in an Iraqi newspaper.

 

The Assyrian civilization flourished in northern Iraq between 1000-700 B.C., archeologists were led to discover the site when they exhumed a burial ground, complete with mud brick grave heads, Global Arab Network reports according to Iraq’s al-Zaman newspaper.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Chinese scientist says prehistoric man ate pandas | World news | The Guardian

Chinese scientist says prehistoric man ate pandas | World news | The Guardian | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A Chinese scientist says that humans used to eat pandas.In a newspaper interview, Wei Guangbiao says prehistoric man ate the bears in what is now part of the city of Chongqing in southwest China.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Neanderthals ... They're Just Like Us?

Neanderthals ... They're Just Like Us? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Well, not exactly. But the latest discoveries have had a surprisingly humanizing effect.

The Neanderthals are both the most familiar and the least understood of all our fossil kin.

 

For decades after the initial discovery of their bones in a cave in Germany in 1856 Homo neanderthalensis was viewed as a hairy brute who stumbled around Ice Age Eurasia on bent knees, eventually to be replaced by elegant, upright Cro-Magnon, the true ancestor of modern Europeans.

more...
Caysha Renton's curator insight, April 29, 2013 5:50 PM

To what extent are Neanderthal and homo sapiens physical and emotional characterisitcs similiar? To what extent do you believe homo sapiens had an impact on the extinciton of Neanderthals and how has this effected who we are today?

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Met Museum launches major web resource offering access to hundreds of its publications

Met Museum launches major web resource offering access to hundreds of its publications | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Metropolitan Museum of Art today launched MetPublications, a major online resource that offers unparalleled in-depth access to the Museum’s renowned print and online publications, covering art, art history, archaeology, conservation, and collecting.

 

Beginning with nearly 650 titles published from 1964 to the present, this new addition to the Met's website, will continue to expand and could eventually offer access to nearly all books, Bulletins, and Journals published by the Metropolitan Museum since its founding in 1870, as well as online publications. Readers may also locate works of art from the Met’s collections that are included within MetPublications and access the most recent information about these works in the Collections section of the Museum’s website.

 

 

more...
Rebecca Kohn's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:04 AM

Exciting news for art history researchers!

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Tomb of Maya queen K’abel discovered in Guatemala : Past Horizons Archaeology

Tomb of Maya queen K’abel discovered in Guatemala : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists in Guatemala have discovered the tomb of Lady K’abel, a seventh-century Maya Holy Snake Lord considered one of the great queens of Classic Maya civilization.

The tomb was discovered during excavations of the royal Maya city of El Perú-Waka’ in northwestern Petén, Guatemala, by a team of archaeologists led by Washington University in St. Louis’ David Freidel, co-director of the expedition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Results of archaeological dig around historic Moray site to be exhibited

Results of archaeological dig around historic Moray site to be exhibited | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Young people from throughout Moray took part in archaeological dig at Moray site over the last year.

Great project from SCotland.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Egypt reopens pyramid to tourists

Egypt reopens pyramid to tourists | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Egypt reopens one of its great pyramids as it attempts to revive a tourism industry badly hit by last year's uprising.

Antiquities Minister Muhammad Ibrahim reopened the Pyramid of Chefren (Khafre) and six ancient tombs at Giza after a long restoration project.

 

He said he was keen to stress that Egypt is a safe country for tourists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

ARCHAEOLOGY - Karkamış artifacts revealed to media

ARCHAEOLOGY - Karkamış artifacts revealed to media | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Artifacts discovered during excavations at Gaziantep’s Karkamış ancient site were presented to the press.

 

The pieces were found in a 663,000 square-meter area following the clearance of mines in a military area near the Syrian border

Discoveries from the southern province of Gaziantep’s Karkamış ancient site were shown to press members on Oct. 9, after excavation first began under tight security measures, as the site is located in a military area on the Syrian border.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Iron oven - Hans Splinter

Iron oven - Hans Splinter | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

to get iron from ore...   you gotta make some fire! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Rain cancels Battle of Hastings

Rain cancels Battle of Hastings | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings on what is believed to be the original battlefield has been cancelled because of torrential rain.

 

English Heritage said for safety reasons the event could not go ahead because of unacceptable levels of mud on the battlefield and public areas.

 

Sunday's re-enactment marked the 946th anniversary of the battle when William the Conqueror defeated King Harold.

 

Hastings Borough Council said the cancellation was a disappointment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Neanderthal expert weighs in on ancient ancestors

Neanderthal expert weighs in on ancient ancestors | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Last Tuesday one of the world's leading experts on Neanderthals, Jean-Jacques Hublin, spoke at the Houston Museum of Natural Science.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeology, jobs and roads

Archaeology, jobs and roads | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

David Petts, a Lecturer at Durham University writes the following in a post

Couple of things caught my eye recently- most recently was the (UK) government announcing plans to revive a series of road building schemes that had been shelved, seemingly funded somehow by a combination of local authorities and commercial capital (because that kind of thing has worked SO well in the past)

 

and

The trouble is, and very few archaeologists I think admit this, is that whatever the pros and cons of road construction (both in environmental terms and as an act of Keynesian economic stimulus), archaeology is just another subcontractor of the construction industry.

Read on for the full debate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Return to Antikythera: Divers revisit wreck where ancient computer found

Return to Antikythera: Divers revisit wreck where ancient computer found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Site where oldest computer lay for thousands of years may yield other treasures and even another Antikythera mechanism...

 

In 1900, Greek sponge divers stumbled across "a pile of dead, naked women" on the seabed near the tiny island of Antikythera. It turned out the figures were not corpses but bronze and marble statues, part of a cargo of stolen Greek treasure that was lost when the Roman ship carrying them sank two thousand years ago on the island's treacherous rocks.

What they had found was amazing....   a whole wreck stuffed with goods from across the Empire and a remarkable early 'computer'  

Now divers are returning to the site. 

 

It has taken scientists over a hundred years to decode the inner workings of those corroded fragments, with x-ray and CT scans finally revealing a sophisticated clockwork machine used to calculate the workings of the heavens

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrfMFhrgOFc&feature=player_embedded

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

NPS Archeology Program: Visiting Archeological Sites

NPS Archeology Program:  Visiting Archeological Sites | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

National Archeology Day

 

Join the National Park Service and the Archaeological Institute of America in celebrating National Archeology Day on October 20, 2012.

 

Archeological places across the nation will offer all kinds of special events, from public archeology days to speakers to exhibits. Learn more about the ways that archeology helps us to learn about the past, and talk to real archeologists!

It's likely that events are happening near you, and not only at NPS parks, but state parks, National Register or National Historic Landmark properties, museums and other sites. Visit the National Archaeology Day interactive map of things to do and places to see. There’s something for everyone!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The Assyrian city of Tushhan: a race against time : Past Horizons Archaeology

The Assyrian city of Tushhan: a race against time : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The ancient mound at Ziyaret Tepe in Diyarbakir province of southeastern Turkey, comprises two distinct areas: a high citadel and an extensive lower town. Since 1997 an international team of archaeologists have been excavating a site that was occupied nearly continuously for 2400 years from the Early Bronze Age (c. 3000 BCE).

 

Over most of this time Ziyaret Tepe was a modest village situated on the fertile Tigris floodplain. However, Professor Timothy Matney of the University of Akron, (the project director) in collaboration with Professor McGinnis of the University of Cambridge discovered that during the Middle Iron Age (c. 882 – 610BCE) Ziyaret Tepe acted as an important urban centre situated on the northern periphery of the Assyrian Empire and was known as the city of Tushhan.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Three skeletons uncovered in McGrath could be ancient Alaskans | Rural Alaska | ADN.com

Three skeletons uncovered in McGrath could be ancient Alaskans | Rural Alaska | ADN.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Workers clearing a plot of land in the Interior Alaska village of McGrath discovered a skull, leading an archaeologist to uncover the nearly complete skeletons of three people, believed to be ancient Alaskans.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

SHAVE A GOOSEBERRY : Past Horizons Archaeology

SHAVE A GOOSEBERRY : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Sit back and enjoy teh wacky humour of Cartoon Reality…

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Human impact felt on Black Sea long before industrial era : Past Horizons Archaeology

Human impact felt on Black Sea long before industrial era : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When geologist Liviu Giosan first reconstructed the history of how the Danube River built its delta, he was presented with a puzzle.

In the delta’s early stages of development, the river deposited its sediment within a protected bay. As the delta expanded onto the Black Sea shelf in the late Holocene and was exposed to greater waves and currents, rather than seeing the decline in sediment storage that he expected, Giosan found the opposite. The delta continued to grow. In fact, it has tripled its storage rate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The Search for Immortality: ancient and modern - BBC News

The Search for Immortality: ancient and modern - BBC News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Search for Immortality: ancient and modernBBC NewsJoin us for a session which looks at how we think about life after death, using the Han exhibition and permanent collection to explore ideas through two ancient civilisations and world religions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Union digs in heels over proposed redundancies for archaeologists - Times Higher Education

Union digs in heels over proposed redundancies for archaeologists - Times Higher Education | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Times Higher Education

 

Union digs in heels over proposed redundancies for archaeologistsTimes Higher EducationUnion officials at the University of Birmingham are to conduct a preliminary ballot on industrial action over the institution's decision to...

more...
No comment yet.