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Variola Virus in a 300-Year-Old Siberian Mummy — NEJM

Variola Virus in a 300-Year-Old Siberian Mummy — NEJM | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Correspondence from The New England Journal of Medicine — Variola Virus in a 300-Year-Old Siberian Mummy...

Via Wednesday Thursday Friday
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Climate Change Thwarted Maya Comeback?

Climate Change Thwarted Maya Comeback? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Much has been made of the so-called 2012 Mayan apocalypse. But for the real Maya people, the end of the world came slowly and timed with historic droughts.

A new, ultra-detailed climate record from a cave in Belize reveals Classic Maya civilization collapsed over centuries as rain dried up, disrupting agriculture and causing instability that led to wars and the crumbling of large cities. A final major drought after the political collapse of the Maya may be what kept the civilization from bouncing back.


Via BelizeNet.com, Maya Research Program
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Ancient Iraq revealed

Ancient Iraq revealed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

After nearly a century away, Harvard archaeology has returned to Iraq.

 

Jason Ur, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, earlier this year launched a five-year archaeological project — the first such Harvard-led endeavor in the war-torn nation since the early 1930s — to scour a 3,200-square-kilometer area around Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish region in northern Iraq, for signs of ancient cities and towns, canals, and roads.

 

Already, Ur said, the effort is paying massive dividends — with some 1,200 potential sites identified in just a few months, and potentially thousands more in the coming years.

 

“What we’re finding is that this is, hands down, the richest archaeological landscape in the Middle East,” Ur said. “Due to the history of conflict and ethnic strife in this region, there was no work done in this area at all, so it really is a tabula rasa, so it’s a very exciting time.”

 

Unfortunately, he said, that blank slate is quickly being erased by development.

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Chamorro remains have been found near the Agana bridge project

Some fragments of ancient Chamorro remains have been found near the Agana bridge project.

SWCA environmental consultants senior archaeologist Sandra Yee says the site is a known ancient Chamorro village and is registered with the Guam State Historic Preservation Office.

The remains and artifacts found are from the latte period which is at least a thousand years ago.

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National Association of Black Scuba Divers to help Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary unravel shipwreck mystery

National Association of Black Scuba Divers to help Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary unravel shipwreck mystery | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Volunteer science divers with the National Association of Black Scuba Divers (NABS) are helping Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary unlock the mystery of an early 20th century shipwreck off Key Largo, Fla. Underwater surveys and research conducted this week will build upon past studies and bring maritime archaeologists a step closer to naming the wreckage.

 

The shallow coral reefs of the Florida Keys have claimed countless ships over the centuries, and contributed to a once-thriving salvaging industry. The mystery wreck rests amid the reef known as “The Elbow” and is joined in close proximity by two known shipwrecks – the USS Arkansas and City of Washington.

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No rest for the dead in crowded Singapore

No rest for the dead in crowded Singapore | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Starting early next year, workers with heavy machinery will begin constructing an eight-lane highway across the small country's oldest surviving major cemetery, overriding the objections of nature lovers and heritage buffs.

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Of hill forts, stotting and pronking. - Digital Digging

Of hill forts, stotting and pronking. - Digital Digging | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Late Iron Age Hill forts and the predation evasion techniques of gazelles.
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Great Wall survey completed after 21,000km

Great Wall survey completed after 21,000km | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An archaeological survey that has been ongoing since 2007 has revealed it’s findings on the true length and condition of China’s Great Wall...

What an achievement!

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King Croesus’s golden brooch to be returned to Turkey

King Croesus’s golden brooch to be returned to Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Lydian Hoard treasure in shape of winged seahorse, sold to pay gambling debts and replaced with a fake, to be taken home...
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The Ecological Importance of Folklore : Riverhabitat

The Ecological Importance of Folklore : Riverhabitat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Looking into belief systems is instrumental in discovering the collective unconscious of a group, that is, the underlying values of a culture: their uncertainties, fears, ambitions, motivations and morals.


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Gymnasium in ancient city to be revealed with digitals

ARCHAEOLOGY - Gymnasium in ancient city to be revealed with digitals | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A centuries-old gymnasium in Muğla’s ancient city of Stratonikeia will be revived for visitors via 3D technology. The 265-meter long historic sports facility is a magnificent sight for an ancient city, according to Pamukkale university academics

 

The world’s largest marble city, the ancient city of Stratonikeia in the Aegean province of Muğla’s Yatağan district, is home to a 2,200-year-old gymnasium, which is being revived with 3D technology to enhance visitors’ experiences.

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Australia's heritage protection process is in crisis

Australia's heritage protection process is in crisis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Minister Simon Corbell's claim (''Heritage protection is just a facade'', November 17, p3) that the Law Court building has no heritage listing, even though it was included in the former Register of the National Estate, highlights a national crisis concerning Australian heritage protection. This has resulted from a serious dumbing down in the conservation process due to discreditable Commonwealth decisions. Whether properties concern indigenous, natural or built-environment values, the unsuspecting public is faced with the defacement or destruction of places which, by due process, have been declared significant.

 

This minimisation of heritage warrants exposure. Between 1976 and 2000, the Australian Heritage Commission included some 14,000 places around the continent in the RNE. About half of this total was published in 1981. Then prime minister Malcolm Fraser introduced The Heritage of Australia with these positive words - ''to make sure that the National Estate is looked after in the way it deserves … although the Register of the National Estate still continues as a vast and ongoing undertaking''.

 

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Roman Camps round Cleghorn | Clydesdale's Heritage

Roman Camps round Cleghorn | Clydesdale's Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The camp which is shown in Roy’s Military Antiquities is on the right bank of the Stobilee Burn 570 metres NW of Cleghorn Mill where the road from Castledykes to Carluke and Bothwellhaugh crossed the Mouse Water.

 

The camp itself amounts to 46.7 acres(18.9 hectares) which would have accommodated a force of about twelve thousand men (two legions). The camp is shaped like a parallelogram and well suited to the topography of the area.

There are indications from an examination of Google Earth of a small fortlet on the high ground to the North.

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The forgotten civilization: Evocative images show how modern-day Mayans have continued traditional way of life

The forgotten civilization: Evocative images show how modern-day Mayans have continued traditional way of life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Even as anthropologists and archaeologists continue to puzzle over the eclipse of the Mayan empire, the Maya themselves are still here, with estimated 6.2million living in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador.

Via Maya Research Program
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Jimmy Nguyen's curator insight, January 23, 2014 2:16 AM

great insight on how the culture is kept alive today. Mayans survive through food, clothing, words and traditions that are still practiced today.

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Rock art needs greater protection

Rock art needs greater protection | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An archaeologist says the WA Government is falling short of its obligations to protect priceless rock art.

 

Ken Mulvaney has been researching rock art in the Kimberley, the Pilbara and the Northern Territory for the past 30 years.

Now based in Dampier, he is paid by a mining company to protect culturally rich areas like the Dampier Archipelago and Burrup Peninsula, where some art is thought to date back 30,000 years.

Dr Mulvaney says mining companies and university research bodies are the only ones spending big to protect the state's heritage.

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Help the Maya Research Program conserve archaeological sites in Belize!

Help the Maya Research Program conserve archaeological sites in Belize! | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Maya Research Program is a U.S.-based non-profit organization (501c3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America.
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Gaziantep’s cave area to become a history museum

ARCHAEOLOGY - Gaziantep’s cave area to become a history museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The 10,000 square-meter cave area in Gaziantep will be transformed into a museum, according to local mayor, Asim Güzelbey.
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Man fined for damaging 150yo archaeological site - Latest Crime News - Keep up with Newstalk ZB

Man fined for damaging 150yo archaeological site - Latest Crime News - Keep up with Newstalk ZB | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A professional antique dealer's been handed a stiff $15,000 fine for damaging an archaeological site in Hamilton dating from the 1860s.

Adam Archer has also been ordered to pay $2,500 in costs after he was found digging for bottles on the site of the old Hamilton Club in February.

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Urn burial site discovered near Kancheepuram under threat

Urn burial site discovered near Kancheepuram under threat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A vast urn-burial site has been found at Mandapam village, near Aarpakkam intersection, about 14 km from Kancheepuram.

The importance of the site, archaeologists say, is that it belongs to a period earlier than the Megalithic Age or Iron Age in Tamil Nadu.

 

They estimate that the site is datable to 1,800 BCE to 1,500 BCE, that is, 3,800 to 3,500 years before the present.

The site, however, has been ravaged by quarrying for blue-metal. Earth-movers have sliced the big urns and smashed into pieces ritual pottery, bowls and terracotta plates inside the urns.

 

Quarrying has reduced the site to small lakes with deposits of blue metal jutting out and broken urns protruding in places. A stone-crushing machine is filling the air with dust.

 

Villager P. Mani, who discovered the site, reported it to V. Arasu, Head of the Department of Tamil, University of Madras, and S. Elango, lecturer in Tamil, Madras University. Dr. Elango, who visited the site a few times, said the flat/conical bottomed urns were buried only one or two feet below the soil surface. While some had ritual pottery and terracotta plates inside, others were empty. There were disintegrated human bones in several urns. More importantly, there were no cairn circles on the surface of the graves to mark them. There were no graffiti marks on the urns.

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UCL Museums & Collections Blog » Blog Archive » Introducing the Touching Heritage volunteer blog

UCL Museums & Collections Blog » Blog Archive » Introducing the Touching Heritage volunteer blog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

I am not sure that I will ever look at a piece of opal the same way again, after a patient at UCLH told me that the piece they were holding reminded them of jellied eel. Apparently, the opal looked, felt and even smelled like a slithery, slimy eel. I’ve heard of flint axe heads that look like poached flathead, amazonite that feels like soap and, eerie faces hidden in the sides of smoky quartz. But, this obviously takes things to a new level.

 

Fascinating use of objects and collections in a new and exciting way!

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Trent Students Dig Up History and Inspiration in Central America

Trent Students Dig Up History and Inspiration in Central America | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

“Trent University has been conducting archaeological research in the Maya lowlands, especially Belize, since the 1970s,” reports Dr. Paul Healy, professor of Anthropology and Archaeology. “We’ve offered students truly rare opportunities almost annually to participate in Maya research at 1000 year-old sites such as Pacbitun, Caledonia, Caracol, Cahal Pech, and for the past 15 years, at Minanha, under the direction of Dr. Gyles Iannone.”

 

We have several professors [Drs. Haines, Iannone, and Healy] who are each conducting research involving Trent students at different locales in Belize. It's almost unique in the world to have this faculty strength, and it means that Trent is not only exceptional for the breadth and depth of its research expertise in Maya archaeology in Canada, but on an international level as well.”

 

“It’s an experience that you can’t put a value on,” says undergraduate student Amanda Sinclair. Ms. Sinclair was the first Trent student from the Oshawa campus to join the student team led by Dr. Helen Haines at the site of Ka’Kabish, Belize. For Ms. Sinclair, the hands-on experience is essential.

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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 12:59 PM
The Maya ruins , great hands on experience
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:04 PM

What a unique opportunity to contribute and learn at such an amazing site under the direction of experienced teams.  The UNESCO site has rich culture and heritage. This is  a unique and exceptional experience. 

 

 

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Roasts and Toasts of Christmas Past | English Heritage

Roasts and Toasts of Christmas Past | English Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
What did the Victorians eat for their Christmas dinner? Why do we decorate trees at Christmas? Who was the 'Lord of Misrule'?
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Soil science adds to evidence for Maya collapse

Soil science adds to evidence for Maya collapse | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New research documents in the soils of Mayan cities and settlements how they farmed, fed themselves and treated the land and perhaps even why their society ultimately declined...
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Archway 'jigsaw' after van crash

Archway 'jigsaw' after van crash | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A historic archway at Scone Palace in Perthshire has been restored after it was reduced to rubble by a van.
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Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland

Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A research team has demonstrated that Norse society did not die out due to an inability to adapt to the Greenlandic diet as isotopic analysis of their bones shows they ate plenty of seals...
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