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No rest for the dead in crowded Singapore

No rest for the dead in crowded Singapore | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Starting early next year, workers with heavy machinery will begin constructing an eight-lane highway across the small country's oldest surviving major cemetery, overriding the objections of nature lovers and heritage buffs.

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Of hill forts, stotting and pronking. - Digital Digging

Of hill forts, stotting and pronking. - Digital Digging | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Late Iron Age Hill forts and the predation evasion techniques of gazelles.
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Great Wall survey completed after 21,000km

Great Wall survey completed after 21,000km | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An archaeological survey that has been ongoing since 2007 has revealed it’s findings on the true length and condition of China’s Great Wall...

What an achievement!

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King Croesus’s golden brooch to be returned to Turkey

King Croesus’s golden brooch to be returned to Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Lydian Hoard treasure in shape of winged seahorse, sold to pay gambling debts and replaced with a fake, to be taken home...
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The Ecological Importance of Folklore : Riverhabitat

The Ecological Importance of Folklore : Riverhabitat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Looking into belief systems is instrumental in discovering the collective unconscious of a group, that is, the underlying values of a culture: their uncertainties, fears, ambitions, motivations and morals.


Via Kyle Kunkel O'Connor
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Gymnasium in ancient city to be revealed with digitals

ARCHAEOLOGY - Gymnasium in ancient city to be revealed with digitals | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A centuries-old gymnasium in Muğla’s ancient city of Stratonikeia will be revived for visitors via 3D technology. The 265-meter long historic sports facility is a magnificent sight for an ancient city, according to Pamukkale university academics

 

The world’s largest marble city, the ancient city of Stratonikeia in the Aegean province of Muğla’s Yatağan district, is home to a 2,200-year-old gymnasium, which is being revived with 3D technology to enhance visitors’ experiences.

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Australia's heritage protection process is in crisis

Australia's heritage protection process is in crisis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Minister Simon Corbell's claim (''Heritage protection is just a facade'', November 17, p3) that the Law Court building has no heritage listing, even though it was included in the former Register of the National Estate, highlights a national crisis concerning Australian heritage protection. This has resulted from a serious dumbing down in the conservation process due to discreditable Commonwealth decisions. Whether properties concern indigenous, natural or built-environment values, the unsuspecting public is faced with the defacement or destruction of places which, by due process, have been declared significant.

 

This minimisation of heritage warrants exposure. Between 1976 and 2000, the Australian Heritage Commission included some 14,000 places around the continent in the RNE. About half of this total was published in 1981. Then prime minister Malcolm Fraser introduced The Heritage of Australia with these positive words - ''to make sure that the National Estate is looked after in the way it deserves … although the Register of the National Estate still continues as a vast and ongoing undertaking''.

 

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Roman Camps round Cleghorn | Clydesdale's Heritage

Roman Camps round Cleghorn | Clydesdale's Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The camp which is shown in Roy’s Military Antiquities is on the right bank of the Stobilee Burn 570 metres NW of Cleghorn Mill where the road from Castledykes to Carluke and Bothwellhaugh crossed the Mouse Water.

 

The camp itself amounts to 46.7 acres(18.9 hectares) which would have accommodated a force of about twelve thousand men (two legions). The camp is shaped like a parallelogram and well suited to the topography of the area.

There are indications from an examination of Google Earth of a small fortlet on the high ground to the North.

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Police recover artifacts stolen from Olympia

Police recover artifacts stolen from Olympia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Police in Patra, western Greece, on Saturday arrested three men in connection with the looting of the Archaeological Museum of Olympia in February.

 

All of the stolen artifacts have been recovered, police said.

“The discovery and arrest of the perpetrators of the robbery and the recovery of the stolen items are a great success,” Alternate Culture Minister Costas Tzavaras said in a statement Saturday.

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Tutankhamun's replica tomb unveiled - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online

Tutankhamun's replica tomb unveiled - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An exact replica tomb of the golden King Tutankhamun, a gift from Madrid- and Zurich-based organisations, is revealed at the opening of the EU Task Force Conference on Tourism and Flexible Investment in Egypt
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Virtual Autopsy of Mummy Reveals Clues About 5500-Year-Old Murder Mystery

Virtual Autopsy of Mummy Reveals Clues About 5500-Year-Old Murder Mystery | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Medical DailyVirtual Autopsy of Mummy Reveals Clues About 5500-Year-Old Murder MysteryMedical DailyThe ancient Egyptian mummy officially named the Gebelein Man, nicknamed Ginger by the countless visitors who have seen him over the past century...

Via Shonda Brock, Phil On The Net
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Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:30 PM

I think it's cool how we can analyze a mummy and be able to know he was murdered.  This happened thousands of years ago yet we have such insight into what happened in that time period.  I'm sure "Ginger" can rest a little better knowing he has his life story cotinuing today.

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The evolution of cooperative behaviour

The evolution of cooperative behaviour | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Human behaviour is a product of two different and interacting processes: genetic evolution and cultural evolution. A new study shows we are more inclined to cooperate than our closest evolutionary ...
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The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture identifies, records and publishes in a consistent format, English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was previously unpublished, and is of crucial importance in helping identify the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. The Corpus documents the earliest Christian field monuments from free-standing carved crosses and innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers.

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Urn burial site discovered near Kancheepuram under threat

Urn burial site discovered near Kancheepuram under threat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A vast urn-burial site has been found at Mandapam village, near Aarpakkam intersection, about 14 km from Kancheepuram.

The importance of the site, archaeologists say, is that it belongs to a period earlier than the Megalithic Age or Iron Age in Tamil Nadu.

 

They estimate that the site is datable to 1,800 BCE to 1,500 BCE, that is, 3,800 to 3,500 years before the present.

The site, however, has been ravaged by quarrying for blue-metal. Earth-movers have sliced the big urns and smashed into pieces ritual pottery, bowls and terracotta plates inside the urns.

 

Quarrying has reduced the site to small lakes with deposits of blue metal jutting out and broken urns protruding in places. A stone-crushing machine is filling the air with dust.

 

Villager P. Mani, who discovered the site, reported it to V. Arasu, Head of the Department of Tamil, University of Madras, and S. Elango, lecturer in Tamil, Madras University. Dr. Elango, who visited the site a few times, said the flat/conical bottomed urns were buried only one or two feet below the soil surface. While some had ritual pottery and terracotta plates inside, others were empty. There were disintegrated human bones in several urns. More importantly, there were no cairn circles on the surface of the graves to mark them. There were no graffiti marks on the urns.

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UCL Museums & Collections Blog » Blog Archive » Introducing the Touching Heritage volunteer blog

UCL Museums & Collections Blog » Blog Archive » Introducing the Touching Heritage volunteer blog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

I am not sure that I will ever look at a piece of opal the same way again, after a patient at UCLH told me that the piece they were holding reminded them of jellied eel. Apparently, the opal looked, felt and even smelled like a slithery, slimy eel. I’ve heard of flint axe heads that look like poached flathead, amazonite that feels like soap and, eerie faces hidden in the sides of smoky quartz. But, this obviously takes things to a new level.

 

Fascinating use of objects and collections in a new and exciting way!

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Trent Students Dig Up History and Inspiration in Central America

Trent Students Dig Up History and Inspiration in Central America | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

“Trent University has been conducting archaeological research in the Maya lowlands, especially Belize, since the 1970s,” reports Dr. Paul Healy, professor of Anthropology and Archaeology. “We’ve offered students truly rare opportunities almost annually to participate in Maya research at 1000 year-old sites such as Pacbitun, Caledonia, Caracol, Cahal Pech, and for the past 15 years, at Minanha, under the direction of Dr. Gyles Iannone.”

 

We have several professors [Drs. Haines, Iannone, and Healy] who are each conducting research involving Trent students at different locales in Belize. It's almost unique in the world to have this faculty strength, and it means that Trent is not only exceptional for the breadth and depth of its research expertise in Maya archaeology in Canada, but on an international level as well.”

 

“It’s an experience that you can’t put a value on,” says undergraduate student Amanda Sinclair. Ms. Sinclair was the first Trent student from the Oshawa campus to join the student team led by Dr. Helen Haines at the site of Ka’Kabish, Belize. For Ms. Sinclair, the hands-on experience is essential.

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chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 12:59 PM
The Maya ruins , great hands on experience
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 1:04 PM

What a unique opportunity to contribute and learn at such an amazing site under the direction of experienced teams.  The UNESCO site has rich culture and heritage. This is  a unique and exceptional experience. 

 

 

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Roasts and Toasts of Christmas Past | English Heritage

Roasts and Toasts of Christmas Past | English Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
What did the Victorians eat for their Christmas dinner? Why do we decorate trees at Christmas? Who was the 'Lord of Misrule'?
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Soil science adds to evidence for Maya collapse

Soil science adds to evidence for Maya collapse | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New research documents in the soils of Mayan cities and settlements how they farmed, fed themselves and treated the land and perhaps even why their society ultimately declined...
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Archway 'jigsaw' after van crash

Archway 'jigsaw' after van crash | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A historic archway at Scone Palace in Perthshire has been restored after it was reduced to rubble by a van.
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Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland

Seal diet provides clue to disappearance of Norse from Greenland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A research team has demonstrated that Norse society did not die out due to an inability to adapt to the Greenlandic diet as isotopic analysis of their bones shows they ate plenty of seals...
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Secrets of 12,000-year-old remains - News VietNamNet

Secrets of 12,000-year-old remains - News VietNamNet | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The unique way of decorating the dead (putting sea
snails into the eye sockets) that was discovered by archaeologists of the Vietnam Institute of Archaeology in Phia Vai cave in Tuyen Quang, has revealed the burial secrets of primitive people.

The story of an archaeologists investigation of a cursed cave.   !


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Can Tutankhamun tempt tourists to Egypt?

VIPs, including the US and Kuwaiti ambassadors, attended the reopening of Tutankhamun's tomb in Luxor, as Egypt tries to reinvigorate its tourist industry to the levels experienced before the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak.

The event was also a celebration the tomb's discovery 90 years ago.

Closed for the past six years for restorations, authorities hope the tomb will be an attraction for holidaymakers whose numbers are down more than 40 percent.

 

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Statues of 5th dynasty top officials discovered in Abusir - Ahram Online

Statues of 5th dynasty top officials discovered in Abusir - Ahram Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Statues of 5th dynasty top officials discovered in AbusirAhram OnlineDuring routine excavations in Abusir South, 30km north of Giza plateau, Czech excavators from the Czech Institute of Egyptology of the Charles University in Prague, unearthed a...

Via Shonda Brock, Phil On The Net
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A Monumental Struggle to Preserve Hagia Sophia

A Monumental Struggle to Preserve Hagia Sophia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In Istanbul, secularists and fundamentalists clash over restoring the nearly 1,500 year-old structure...

Via Eliza Martin
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Eliza Martin's comment, February 23, 2013 12:05 AM
this is an amzing websit
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Experts visit ancient boat site at Kuakata

Experts visit ancient boat site at Kuakata | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A team of archaeologists accompanied by high officials from Dhaka and Patuakhali yesterday examined the site of the historic boat, found under the sand in Kuakata beach on June 7 this year, to chalk out a technical strategy for salvation of the boat by February 2013.

As the team led by Director General of the Department of Archaeology Begum Shirin Akhtar reached the spot, about 1.5 kilometres east of Kuakata Zero Point, they found the 72-foot-long and 22.5-foot-wide boat covered with sand. They conducted digging, revealing a part of the wooden structure.

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