Archaeology News
127.2K views | +8 today
Follow
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeological excavations continued at Cyprus ancient theatre

Archaeological excavations continued at Cyprus ancient theatre | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeological excavations at Paphos' ancient theatre continued in 2012, unearthing a number of significant finds, including fragments of marble sculptural adornments from the theatre’s stage building and the nymphaeum.

 

This was the 15th season of archaeological investigations of the precinct of the ancient Hellenistic-Roman theatre of Nea Paphos.

The excavations were conducted by the University of Sydney under the direction of Dr Craig Barker and Dr Smadar Gabrielli. The Australian archaeological excavations in Paphos are supported by the Nicholson Museum and by the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure The...

Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure The... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure “ The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper. ~ W.B. Yeats ” “ The little gold boat captured my imagination from the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Review: Mayan doomsayers on NatGeo

Review: Mayan doomsayers on NatGeo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
THE SHOWS "The Mayan Apocalypse 2012" and "Maya Underworld: The Real Doomsday," Monday night at 9 and 10, respectively, on National Geographic Channel

WHAT THEY'RE ABOUT Dec.21, 2012 ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Anthropology, Archaeology, and History
Scoop.it!

Uncovering Athens' Ancient Harbour: The Zea Harbour Project Interview

Uncovering Athens' Ancient Harbour: The Zea Harbour Project Interview | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Zea Harbour Project (ZHP) is a combined land and underwater archaeological investigation of the ancient harbours of Zea and Mounichia in the Piraeus (Athens’ harbour city) in Greece.

Via Wednesday Thursday Friday
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Arch move sparks heritage debate - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Arch move sparks heritage debate - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The relocation of a large sandstone arch in central Tasmania has ignited a heritage debate.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Treasure from Spanish shipwreck that sank off Portugal's Atlantic coast shown for the first time

Treasure from Spanish shipwreck that sank off Portugal's Atlantic coast shown for the first time | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Spanish cultural officials allowed a first peek Friday at some of the 16 tons (14.5 metric tons) of shipwreck treasure worth an estimated $500 million that a U.S. salvage company gave up this year after a five-year ownership dispute.

 

Only a tiny portion of the haul from the Nuestra Senora de las Mercedes, a galleon that sank off Portugal's Atlantic coast near the straits of Gibraltar in 1804, was shown to the media: 12 individual silver coins, a block of encrusted silver coins stuck together after centuries underwater, two gold tobacco boxes and a bronze pulley

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

China unearths ancient palace ruins: state media

China unearths ancient palace ruins: state media | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

China has unearthed the ruins of an ancient palace near the tomb of the country's first emperor that was already famed for its terracotta soldiers, state media said on Saturday.

The discovery is the latest at the mausoleum, which dates back more than two millennia and became one of the greatest modern archaeological finds after a peasant digging a well stumbled upon the life-size warriors in 1974.

The palace "is the largest complex ever found at the cemetery", the Xinhua news agency said, citing Sun Weigang, a researcher at the archaeology institute of northern Shaanxi province where the site is located.

more...
joseph mora's curator insight, October 29, 2013 1:10 PM

emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb with guard /statues....

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Wall at Pompeii collapses after heavy rain

Wall at Pompeii collapses after heavy rain | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A Roman wall at Pompeii in southern Italy has collapsed, local archaeologists say, in the latest in a series of accidents at the ancient city buried by a volcanic explosion 2 000 years ago.

 

The section of wall some two metres (seven feet)long was part of the ruins of a house at the sprawling site near Naples. The area has seen heavy rain in recent weeks, and previous collapses have been linked to bad weather.

 

The local archaeological authority said in a statement that the announcement of a tender for the long-delayed conservation project was "imminent".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

World War II Spitfires buried in Burma to be excavated by British team | Culture24

World War II Spitfires buried in Burma to be excavated by British team | Culture24 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Led by a Lincolnshire aviation enthusiast, an expedition to Burma is expected to excavate as many as 36 Spitfire fighter planes buried in crates during World War II.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Featured UK Mummy Museums:  Manchester Museum

Featured UK Mummy Museums:  Manchester Museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

 

The Manchester Museum on the campus of the University of Manchester (England) has one of the best displays of Egyptian mummies in the world.

 

The museum has two ancient Egypt galleries: Daily Life and Death and the Afterlife. Both are definitely a must-see for a number of reasons.

 

First, a display of the mummy Asru, a chantress at the Temple of Amun in Karnak, has been installed. Asru takes her place along with at least eight other mummies (according to one account, the museum holds eighteen mummies, though they are not all displayed).

 

The museum has thoughtfully provided clear labels with detailed information about each mummy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient bazaar to serve tourism

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient bazaar to serve tourism | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

One of the ancient structures in the ancient city of Tripoli is being unearthed during excavations that will continue until the end of 2013. The structure is a bazaar that will open to tourism

 

An ancient closed bazaar the city of Tripoli, located in the Aegean province of Denizli’s Buldan district, will be completely unearthed and restored for commercial activity.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

First Sicilians didn't much care for seafood, skeletons reveal

First Sicilians didn't much care for seafood, skeletons reveal | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Despite a seaside home overlooking the Mediterranean, the very first human settlers of Sicily weren't seafood lovers, new research finds.

 

In an analysis published Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE, skeletal remains of the people who occupied the site around 10,000 years ago show no telltale signs of seafood eating. Instead, researchers say, these hunter-gatherers chowed down on game such as deer and boar.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

24 Hours in a Great War Trench recreated

24 Hours in a Great War Trench recreated | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Andrew Robertshaw, Honorary Lecturer at the Institute, has recreated a WWI trench in the garden of his Surrey home, recording battle experience in a new book 24 Hours in Battle set in April 1918.

Andrew, a military historian who runs the Royal Logistics Corps Museum in Deepcut and was previously Head of Education at the National Army Museum, co-ordinated the project to recreate a 20m (60ft) long WWI trench in his back garden in Charlwood, Surrey to help to understand what soldiers went through from 1914-1918.

 

The replica trench system, consisting of at least two fire bays, a listening post or sap, a section of communication trench to provide access and at least one latrine, cooking area and a dug out is made up of extensive amounts of corrugated iron, revetting timber and sandbags and took a month to build by volunteers and soldiers from the 23 Pioneer Regiment Royal Logistics Corps who had recently returned from Afghanistan.

 

Andrew and his colleague David Kenyon, both leading experts in the character of trench life in the Great War who have carried out academic studies of trench systems and conditions and trench archaeology, have established Battlefield Partnerships to plan and supervise the replica trench system as well as advising, training and equiping the ‘soldiers'.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

400-Year-Old Playing Cards Reveal Royal Secret

400-Year-Old Playing Cards Reveal Royal Secret | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Call it a card player's dream. A complete set of 52 silver playing cards gilded in gold and dating back 400 years has been discovered.

 

Created in Germany around 1616, the cards were engraved by a man named Michael Frömmer, who created at least one other set of silver cards.

 

According to a story, backed up by a 19th-century brass plate, the cards were at one point owned by a Portuguese princess who fled the country, cards in hand, after Napoleon's armies invaded in 1807.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Roma Antiqua
Scoop.it!

How the end of a book was marked in ancient rolls

How the end of a book was marked in ancient rolls | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient works were frequently divided into many books.  What did the end of a book look like, in an ancient roll?

Via Julio Peña
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

BSR Archaeology Featured in Forma Urbis « The British School at Rome

BSR Archaeology Featured in Forma Urbis « The British School at Rome | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Forma Urbis, the Italian archaeological magazine, has been entirely devoted to the the work and research of the BSR in its November 2012 issue.

The magazine highlights the archaeological work undertaken by the BSR such as geophysics, the Portus Project, excavations at Segni, the publication of Veii as well as the current work of the Herculaneum Conservation Project. It also showcases the important work of the library by way of the acclaimed photographic exhibition of Thomas Ashby in the Abruzzo as well as exploring the rich archive held at the BSR.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

New timeline proposed for the building of Stonehenge

New timeline proposed for the building of Stonehenge | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient people probably assembled the massive sandstone horseshoe at Stonehenge more than 4,600 years ago, while the smaller bluestones were imported from Wales later, a new study suggests.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Teaching history and archaeology to kids
Scoop.it!

6500-year-old Aboriginal heritage junked for KFC outlet

6500-year-old Aboriginal heritage junked for KFC outlet | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

One of Australia's most significant Aboriginal heritage sites in Newcastle was deliberately destroyed so that a KFC outlet could be built over the top. 


Via Louise Zarmati
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Secrets of Manchester’s mummies revealed by a trip to the hospital

Secrets of Manchester’s mummies revealed by a trip to the hospital | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Pioneering research brings new stories of Egyptian life and death to revamped Ancient Worlds gallery at city museum...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

State News Agency Announces Unicorn Lair Find, Cite History Books As Proof Of Creature's Existence

State News Agency Announces Unicorn Lair Find, Cite History Books As Proof Of Creature's Existence | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In an announcement Friday that seems better suited for a fairy tale, a North Korean state news agency reported that archaeologists recently reconfirmed the lair of a unicorn once ridden by an ancient Korean king.!"!!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

In Istanbul, A Byzantine-Era Fleet Surfaces Again : NPR

In Istanbul, A Byzantine-Era Fleet Surfaces Again : NPR | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In Istanbul, construction of much-needed transit projects was halted when astonishing archaeological treasures began turning up. Now, archaeologists are poring over a stunning trove of artifacts, including some three dozen Byzantine-era ships.

 

The excavation began eight years ago on projects intended to ease Istanbul's notoriously clogged traffic.

The job included building a tunnel under the Bosphorus Strait and linking it to a rail and subway network. When the dig was stopped several years ago, eyes rolled and shoulders shrugged.

Enlarge Mustafa Ozer/AFP/Getty ImagesArchaeologists in Istanbul work on the remnants of a Byzantine-era ship in June 2006.

Istanbul is, after all, one of those grand and ancient places — like Rome, Athens or Jerusalem — where this kind of thing tends to happen often.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Pictures: Oldest Pharaoh Rock Art Rediscovered in Egypt

Pictures: Oldest Pharaoh Rock Art Rediscovered in Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Rare pictures of what may be Egypt's founding king, Narmer, have been found near Aswan a century after their first discovery.

 

This ancient rock picture near Egypt's Nile River was first spotted by an explorer more than a century ago—and then almost completely forgotten.

 

Scientists who rediscovered it now think it's the earliest known depiction of a pharaoh.

 

The royal figure at the center of the panel wears the "White Crown," the bowling pin-shaped headpiece that symbolized kingship of southern Egypt, and carries a long scepter. Two attendants bearing standards march ahead of him; behind him, an attendant waves a large fan to cool the royal head. A hound-like dog with pointed ears walks at the ruler's feet. Surrounding the king are large ships, symbols of dominance, towed by bearded men pulling on ropes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Monitoring to increase after Sugarloaf vandalized

Monitoring to increase after Sugarloaf vandalized | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Jim Graceffa and Bud Henderson had come out to the Sugarloaf ruin a week ago Monday to survey some fence lines.

Founding members of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center, they had been invited by the property owners, the Archaeology Conservancy, as part of a management agreement between the two organizations.

 

But while walking the property searching for property markers, they were told by a neighbor that some pot hunting materials had been found at the at the hilltop site.


Hata'lacva, near Clarkdale, was professionally excavated in 1933 and 1934 as part of the Tuzigoot excavation and restoration and like Sugarloaf is owned by the Archaeology Conservancy.

Pilles says the recent rash of rock art defacing is of concern to researchers and frustrating to those whose job it is to protect them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Paphos excavation reveals Bronze Age malting kiln

Paphos excavation reveals Bronze Age malting kiln | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists working in Western Cyprus are raising a glass to the discovery of a Bronze Age ‘micro-brewery’, one of the earliest ever found...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Roman Hoard discovery to stay in county | Evesham Observer

Roman Hoard discovery to stay in county | Evesham Observer | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

THE LARGEST haul of Roman treasure ever found in Worcestershire will be staying in the county, museum bosses have announced.

 

The Bredon Hoard, made up of almost 4,000 Roman coins, was discovered on Bredon Hill near Evesham last year by metal detecting enthusiasts Jethro Carpenter and Mark Gilmore, both from Redditch.

 

Research carried out by Worcestershire Archaeology and Archives Service with the British Museum discovered the hoard was buried nearly a century after it was accumulated - the only known example in Britain - meaning the coins were of unique and national significance.

 

But their importance meant Worcestershire County Council had to raise about £40,000 to display them in the area rather than at the British Museum in London.

 

more...
No comment yet.