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Danish Journal of Archaeology

Danish Journal of Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Mads Dengsø Jessen of the National Museum of Denmark wrote to Martin Rundkvist (Aardvarchaeology) to say that he and his colleagues are re-launching the old Journal of Danish Archaeology (1982-2006) as Danish Journal of Archaeology at Taylor and Francis On-Line.

Subscribers get access to the full back-catalogue of the old JDA, as well as new papers. You can also buy PDFs of single papers without subscribing, but this is jævle expensive. Whether Open Access alternatives will be available appears uncertain at the moment:

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More to Mayans than 'doomsday' links

More to Mayans than 'doomsday' links | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Pope has warned Christians not to believe predictions that the world will end on December 21 and the space agency NASA has been moved to debunk officially various theories — mystery planets, sun flares, planetary alignments — as to how it will...

 

Irate Mayans living today in Central America and southern Mexico say the whole thing is rubbish — one of their very long calendar cycles does come to an end on that date but then another one will start.

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Intelligence and mental illness linked to ancient genetic accident

Intelligence and mental illness linked to ancient genetic accident | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Scientists have discovered for the first time how humans – and other mammals – have evolved to have intelligence. Researchers have identified the moment in history when the genes that enabled us to think and reason evolved. This point 500 million years ago provided our ability to learn complex skills, analyse situations and have flexibility in the way in which we think.

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Metal detectors plunder heritage site - Crime - Northampton Chronicle and Echo

Metal detectors plunder heritage site - Crime - Northampton Chronicle and Echo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

TWO metal-detecting enthusiasts were caught red-handed plundering an ancient Roman and Iron Age archeological site in Northamptonshire.

 

Peter Cox, 69, and Darren West, 51, were arrested while in the process of stealing ancient artefacts from Chester Farm, near Irchester.

 

Northampton Crown Court heard the site contained the remains of an Iron Age settlement, a walled Roman town and its suburbs, ancient fields and parkland, a deserted medieval village and areas of more recent ironstone extraction.

 

Sad that they do this...  and drag archaeology societies and Finds Liason Officers into this. 

Shame on them,.....   the worst thing is of course summed up in this section

“We will never know the full extent of the damage caused by these criminals, to a site of such cultural importance, which saddens me immensely.”

"


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Helmets, Viking gold and Royal boars: Portable Antiquities Scheme releases 2011 report | Culture24

Helmets, Viking gold and Royal boars: Portable Antiquities Scheme releases 2011 report | Culture24 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

From St Albans to North Yorkshire, take a look at some of the incredible treasures recorded during another year of intrigue spurred by archaeological discoveries across the country.

Nearly 100,000 archaeological discoveries – ranging from Roman helmets to Viking gold – were made during 2011, according to the annual report by the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

 

In a typically eventful year of soil digging, including primetime exposure for the Scheme’s greatest breakthroughs on the ITV series Secret Treasures, the official figures show an eight percent rise in finds, with a total of 970 Treasure cases

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Prehistoric Painters Planned Ahead

Prehistoric Painters Planned Ahead | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Prehistoric Painters Planned Ahead - ScienceNOW...

 

A discovery in South Africa suggests that prehistoric human painters also planned ahead, using ochre paint kits as early as 100,000 years ago.

 

But just what they used the paints for is still a matter of debate.Red or yellow ochre, an iron-containing pigment found in some clays, is ubiquitous at early modern human sites in Africa and the Near East. Some researchers think the earliest known art comes from the site of Blombos in South Africa, about 300 kilometers east of Cape Town, where pieces of ochre incised with an abstract design have been dated to 77,000 years old.

 

Scientists have found even earlier signs of ochre use at Blombos and other sites as old as 165,000 years, but solid evidence that the pigment was used in artistic or other symbolic communication has been lacking.

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Shrunken Head DNA Proves Horrific Folklore True : Discovery News

Shrunken Head DNA Proves Horrific Folklore True : Discovery News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Genetic analysis of a shrunken head verifies anecdotal accounts of violent head-hunting in South America.
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Desecration: Unearthed Native Burial Site Causes Uproar

Desecration: Unearthed Native Burial Site Causes Uproar | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The summer sky drizzles rain as Arden Kucate and Theresa Pasqual drive toward a nondescript field in eastern Arizona.


Bones — including skulls, ribs, femurs, jaws, and fingers — from at least 10 ancient adults and adolescents were ripped from their graves, broken and scattered by bulldozers and backhoes. The devastation occurred in late April 2011 when the Arizona Game and Fish Department started construction on a public fishing pond.

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The Gates of Hell: Exploring Mexico's Sacred Caves - SPIEGEL ONLINE

The Gates of Hell: Exploring Mexico's Sacred Caves - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula is dotted with thousands of caves that once housed prehistoric people and later became sacred to the Mayans. German archaeologists and filmmakers are currently involved in a project to explore with modern imaging technology and make a 3-D film of this underwater labyrinth.

 

A person died here hundreds of years ago. His body fell into the flooded cave and sank into the water. His flesh gradually separated from his bones. Today, he stares at divers out of empty eye sockets. His skull seems to be pushing its way out of the soil, as if he were trying to rise from the dead, to rise up from the sand, shake the tiresome sediment from his bones and escape from the silent darkness.

 

 

 

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400-Year-Old Playing Cards Reveal Royal Secret

400-Year-Old Playing Cards Reveal Royal Secret | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Call it a card player's dream. A complete set of 52 silver playing cards gilded in gold and dating back 400 years has been discovered.

 

Created in Germany around 1616, the cards were engraved by a man named Michael Frömmer, who created at least one other set of silver cards.

 

According to a story, backed up by a 19th-century brass plate, the cards were at one point owned by a Portuguese princess who fled the country, cards in hand, after Napoleon's armies invaded in 1807.

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How the end of a book was marked in ancient rolls

How the end of a book was marked in ancient rolls | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient works were frequently divided into many books.  What did the end of a book look like, in an ancient roll?

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BSR Archaeology Featured in Forma Urbis « The British School at Rome

BSR Archaeology Featured in Forma Urbis « The British School at Rome | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Forma Urbis, the Italian archaeological magazine, has been entirely devoted to the the work and research of the BSR in its November 2012 issue.

The magazine highlights the archaeological work undertaken by the BSR such as geophysics, the Portus Project, excavations at Segni, the publication of Veii as well as the current work of the Herculaneum Conservation Project. It also showcases the important work of the library by way of the acclaimed photographic exhibition of Thomas Ashby in the Abruzzo as well as exploring the rich archive held at the BSR.

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New timeline proposed for the building of Stonehenge

New timeline proposed for the building of Stonehenge | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient people probably assembled the massive sandstone horseshoe at Stonehenge more than 4,600 years ago, while the smaller bluestones were imported from Wales later, a new study suggests.
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Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved?

Pompeii Is Crumbling—Can It Be Saved? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Collapses highlight "critical" situation, but site is "absolutely safe for tourists."

Last month, part of a major wall came tumbling down in Pompeii, the ancient Roman city frozen in time by a f...

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Gladiator's Tomb to Be Reburied : Discovery News

Gladiator's Tomb to Be Reburied : Discovery News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Fantasy and Fiction merged, but now harsh reality takes over. 

 

The large marble monument of Marcus Nonius Macrinus will be reburied as an archaeological project runs out of funds.

 

The tomb of the ancient Roman hero believed to have inspired the Russell Crowe blockbuster "Gladiator," might be returned to oblivion four years after its discovery in Rome.

 

A lack of fundings is forcing Italian archaeologists to bury again the large marble monument of Marcus Nonius Macrinus, a general and consul who achieved major victories in military campaigns for Antoninus Pius, the Roman emperor from 138 to 161 A.D., and Marcus Aurelius, emperor from 161 to 180 A.D.

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Unwrapping the mummy – performance and science

Unwrapping the mummy – performance and science | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Mummies have been objects of horror and fascination in popular culture since the early 1800s at least — over a century before Boris Karloff portrayed an ancient Egyptian searching for his lost love in the 1932 film “The Mummy.”

 

Public “unwrappings” of mummified human remains performed by both showmen and scientists heightened the fascination, but also helped develop the growing science of Egyptology.

 

Dr. Kathleen Sheppard an historian from the Missouri University of Science and Technology argues this point in her latest article entitled “Between Spectacle and Science: Margaret Murray and the Tomb of the Two Brothers” in the December issue of the journal Science in Context.

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Shipwrecked fleet found at ancient harbour off coast of Israel

Shipwrecked fleet found at ancient harbour off coast of Israel | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The remains of part of the fleet of early-19th century ships and ancient harbour structures from the Hellenistic period have been uncovered at the city of Akko (Acre) by a team of archaeologists...
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Sion Treasures to return home in Turkey

Sion Treasures to return home in Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A large mosaic tabloid will return to Turkey within the month as well as a winged seahorse brooch by the end of 2013, according to Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay. Speaking at the Second International Resort Tourism Congress in Antalya, Günay said that the brooch was the most important of the artifacts that Turkey has recently gathered.

 

“The brooch will come from Berlin and we are trying to complete this procedure. We are working in accordance with diplomatic and museum rules.”

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Development of New Technologies In Marine Archaeology - News ...

Development of New Technologies In Marine Archaeology - News ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A Swedish research foundation has granted MARIS at Södertörn University, Sweden, funds to develop non-intrusive methods for deep water archaeology together with MMT. The project focuses on developing new ...

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Çatalhöyük: Shrine of the Hunters

The 'Shrine of the Hunters' is an archaeological reconstruction of a level 5 house from Çatalhöyük. It was originally excavated in the 1960's by James Mellaart and aside from a few informational illustrations, has had surprisingly little coverage.

 

One of the most decorated houses ever found at the site, this piece began as the focus of a MSc Dissertation by Grant Cox during the Virtual Pasts course at the University of Southampton and has since evolved into an animation.

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:41 PM

this link show the inside of how a shrine/house would look with all the decorations.

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The Vráble-Fidvár Bronze Age site ranks among top 10 digs in Europe - The Slovak Spectator

The Vráble-Fidvár Bronze Age site ranks among top 10 digs in Europe - The Slovak Spectator | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Vráble-Fidvár Bronze Age site ranks among top 10 digs in EuropeThe Slovak SpectatorSlovak and German archaeologists have joined forces to explore the secrets of the Early Bronze Age city.


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Archaeological excavations continued at Cyprus ancient theatre

Archaeological excavations continued at Cyprus ancient theatre | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeological excavations at Paphos' ancient theatre continued in 2012, unearthing a number of significant finds, including fragments of marble sculptural adornments from the theatre’s stage building and the nymphaeum.

 

This was the 15th season of archaeological investigations of the precinct of the ancient Hellenistic-Roman theatre of Nea Paphos.

The excavations were conducted by the University of Sydney under the direction of Dr Craig Barker and Dr Smadar Gabrielli. The Australian archaeological excavations in Paphos are supported by the Nicholson Museum and by the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens.

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Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure The...

Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure The... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Striking Gold: Ireland’s Buried Treasure “ The world is full of magic things, patiently waiting for our senses to grow sharper. ~ W.B. Yeats ” “ The little gold boat captured my imagination from the...
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Review: Mayan doomsayers on NatGeo

Review: Mayan doomsayers on NatGeo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
THE SHOWS "The Mayan Apocalypse 2012" and "Maya Underworld: The Real Doomsday," Monday night at 9 and 10, respectively, on National Geographic Channel

WHAT THEY'RE ABOUT Dec.21, 2012 ...
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Uncovering Athens' Ancient Harbour: The Zea Harbour Project Interview

Uncovering Athens' Ancient Harbour: The Zea Harbour Project Interview | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Zea Harbour Project (ZHP) is a combined land and underwater archaeological investigation of the ancient harbours of Zea and Mounichia in the Piraeus (Athens’ harbour city) in Greece.

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