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Ancient rock art comes back to life

Ancient rock art comes back to life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

IN a world first, laser technology has been used to clean up millennia-old Aboriginal rock art at Davies Creek, near Kuranda.

And the results are going to be shown in a 52-minute documentary on Austrian, German and Swiss television next April.

 

Jurgen Steiner, who for 17 years has worked on restoring old churches and castles in his native Austria, worked at the site in 2008 and 2009 applying a substance to harden the rock underneath.

 

Now he has returned with a unique laser to clean up thousands of years of dirt and grime to return the ancient artwork to near to its original condition.

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Historic Shipwreck Identified at Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Historic Shipwreck Identified at Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Seventy years after it was scuttled off Los Angeles, Calif., government archaeologists have found the wrecked remains of a rare Pacific Coast schooner that was employed in the lumber trade during the early 1900s.Today, Robert Schwemmer, maritime archaeologist for NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, presented a scientific paper on the George E. Billings history and its discovery in February 2011 at the eighth California Islands Symposium in Ventura, Calif.

 

The Billings, a five-masted schooner built in 1903 by Halls Bros. of Port Blakeley, Wash., hauled lumber from the Northwest to Hawaii, Mexico, South America, Australia and southern California. After decades servicing the lumber trade it was converted into a sport-fishing barge. In 1941, the owner decided to scuttle the aging vessel off the coast of Santa Barbara Island.

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The Essay -part 4: Anglo-Saxon Portraits -BBC

Martin Carver recreates the lives of three powerful pagan women: a privileged pagan girl from the earliest period, a 'cunning woman', and a princess buried in her bed.

Excellent series on Radio 3

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Egypt’s ‘collapsing’ pyramids : Past Horizons Archaeology

Egypt’s ‘collapsing’ pyramids : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Peter James, MD of Cintec International, has worked on projects around the globe, strengthening and restoring historically significant structures from Windsor Castle to the parliament buildings in Canada. After fourteen years working on Egypt’s historic buildings, temples and most recently, the Step Pyramid, he draws on his experience to dispel some of the more common theories surrounding Egypt’s ‘collapsing’ pyramids. Peter goes on to suggest that the gradual crumbling of the pyramids’ outer casings as the structures became unsound may have been the trigger behind moving Pharaohs’ burials from the pyramids to the Valley of the Kings.

 

My first introduction to working in Egypt was a project in Cairo’s historic old quarter, following the 1992 earthquake that caused widespread and devastating damage. Cintec International won the contract to repair and reinforce a number of badly affected structures, with work commencing in 1998.

 

The project consisted of some 15 notable mosques and maqaads, successfully strengthened using Cintec’s patented anchoring systems. Most of the essential work was completed by early 2005, with ongoing localised repairs still being undertaken as and when required.

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Sky Caves of Nepal - Pictures, National Geographic Magazine

Sky Caves of Nepal - Pictures, National Geographic Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Cliffside caves in the former kingdom of Mustang are giving up their secrets.

 

The skull, a human skull, was perched atop a crumbly boulder in the remote northern reaches of the Nepalese district of Mustang. Pete Athans, the leader of an interdisciplinary team of mountaineers and archaeologists, stepped into his harness and tied himself to a rope. He scrambled up the 20-foot boulder, belayed by another climber, Ted Hesser.

 

When he reached the skull, he pulled on blue latex gloves to prevent his DNA from contaminating the find, and gradually removed it from the rubble. Athans was almost certainly the first person to hold this skull in 1,500 years. Dirt spilled from the eye cavities. He placed it in a padded red bag and lowered it to three scientists waiting below: Mark Aldenderfer of the University of California, Merced; Jacqueline Eng of Western Michigan University; and Mohan Singh Lama of Nepal’s Department of Archaeology.

An amazing story and photographic article from the National Geographic.   Taking us to the kingdom of Mustang in Nepal. 

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Richard III archaeology team awarded honour for Leicester dig

Richard III archaeology team awarded honour for Leicester dig | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Richard III Society has officially thanked the team which exhumed a skeleton believed to be that of the last Plantagenet king.

 

The society gave the project's instigator Philippa Langley its Robert Hamblin Award, which recognises "work of outstanding service" by a society member.

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National Archaeology Day - Archaeological Institute of America

National Archaeology Day - Archaeological Institute of America | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
National Archeology Day! Who knew?http://t.co/8ih86zfV...
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PERPETUITY

PERPETUITY | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

This is a personal rendering of the world of archeology.

 

Specialy the warm hearted and sensitive work of Ronald Becket, Gerald Conlogue and Sonia Guillén.

A collaborative work of 4 years.

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Mythic mosaics conceal subliminal messages : Past Horizons Archaeology

Mythic mosaics conceal subliminal messages : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New research carried out by professor Luz Neira from the Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M) shows that depictions of Greek gods and heroes were symbols of the values of all that Rome stood for.

 

Previously it had been shown that memory and conscious self-interested re-use of myths was important, but this new research examines the possibility that there is a subliminal message regarding the Roman elites’ fundamental concept of civilisation versus barbarism.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Mythological theater reliefs found in Muğla

ARCHAEOLOGY - Mythological theater reliefs found in Muğla | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavations at the ancient city of Stratonikeia in the Aegean province of Muğla’s Yatağan district have uncovered 15 reliefs estimated to be 2,300 years old. The masks feature mythological gods and have been engraved into marble blocks.

 

The theater currently under excavation in Stratonikeia was one of the most important centers for education and culture during its day, the head of the excavations Professor Bilal Söğüt said. “We have recently found 15 2,300-year-old reliefs of mythological gods chiseled out of marble blocks. The reliefs support written documents describing the time period.”

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Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men

Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Interview with Jelena Bekvalac, Osteology Curator of Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men is now open at the Museum of London until 14 April 2013.
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Divers mark end of Queen Anne's Revenge expedition | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

Divers mark end of Queen Anne's Revenge expedition | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A formal ceremony is marking the end of an eight-week expedition to recover artifacts from the ship believed to have belonged to Blackbeard.

 

The ceremony is scheduled for today in Beaufort.

The event highlights the conclusion of the expedition by archaeologists to recover artifacts from Queen Anne's Revenge. Since 1997, several of the cannons and more than 250,000 artifacts have been retrieved including gold, platters, glass, beads, rope, the anchor and several ballast stones.

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Bulgarian Archaeologists Rescue Thracian Treasure from Hwy Construction: Bulgarian Archaeologists Rescue Thracian Treasure from Hwy Construction - Novinite.com - Sofia News Agency

Bulgarian Archaeologists Rescue Thracian Treasure from Hwy Construction: Bulgarian Archaeologists Rescue Thracian Treasure from Hwy Construction - Novinite.com - Sofia News Agency | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A real archaeological treasure has popped out underneath the "Struma" highway construction works in western Bulgaria.

Archaeologists at the site have managed a last-minute rescue operation, pulling "under the nose" of waiting construction workers and machinery gold soldier breastplates, gold earrings and hairpins, and a number of silver and amber items, the Bulgarian Standard daily writes Friday.

The finds came from an unseen so far in size Thracian necropolis in the vicinity of the village of Dren, near the town of Radomir. They have been unearthed in the spring of 2012, after flooding in the area, but were kept secret in order to prevent their pillage from illegal treasure hunters.

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City courthouse dig tells Civil War story

City courthouse dig tells Civil War story | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Call it “Building X.”

 

What remains of it lay, buried and long forgotten until now, beside today’s Fredericksburg City Hall where a new courthouse will soon rise.

 

Now, thanks to intense scrutiny by archaeologists and local researchers in recent weeks, you can add this once-substantial row house to the casualties of the Battle of Fredericksburg.

 

The Civil War’s most lopsided Confederate victory, won 150 years ago this December, not only killed or wounded nearly 18,000 men, it erased the brick structure from the town’s landscape.

 

Excellent long and well informed piece on the excavations in

house destroyed in Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

hiding in a cellar, while battle raged...    now read on!!

 

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Top ten archaeological finds in Ireland - PHOTOS

Top ten archaeological finds in Ireland - PHOTOS | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Top ten archaeological finds in Ireland - PHOTOS...

simple as that!

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Roman Settlement Found on A453 | Wessex Archaeology

Roman Settlement Found on A453 | Wessex Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists discovered a late Iron Age/early Roman settlement along the route of the Highway Agency’s A453 widening scheme. The team from Wessex Archaeology identified the site as a farmstead dating from the 1st century BC to the 3rd century AD.

Finds from the site include the foundation of a stone building, human remains, and pots placed in pits in the ground. Remnants of household waste also survived, such as broken domestic pottery and discarded animal bone.



Wessex Archaeology have offices in Salisbury, Sheffield, Rochester and Edinburgh. We are one of the UK's leading heritage practices.

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Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada

Evidence of Viking Outpost Found in Canada | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Telltale blade sharpeners may be smoking guns in the quest for the New World's second known Viking site.

For the past 50 years—since the discovery of a thousand-year-old Viking way station in Newfoundland—archaeologists and amateur historians have combed North America's east coast searching for traces of Viking visitors.

 

It has been a long, fruitless quest, littered with bizarre claims and embarrassing failures. But at a conference in Canada earlier this month, archaeologist Patricia Sutherland announced new evidence that points strongly to the discovery of the second Viking outpost ever discovered in the Americas.

 

---  What a great new find!   ---

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient city of Spradon waits for final decision

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient city of Spradon waits for final decision | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A rich history lies within the Ispartakule area of Istanbul’s Avcılar neighborhood, which has been riddled with treasure hunters for many years and is currently being eyed by Turkey’s Mass Housing Administration (TOKİ) as a desired location to build residences, according to daily Radikal.

 

Excavations carried out by archaeologists from the Istanbul Archaeology Museum have unearthed graves and objects from the 5th and 6th centuries. The museum defines the area as the ancient city of Spradon while TOKİ’s own experts have prepared a report claiming there is no ancient city in the area.

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Blood, sex & greed: Canadian history is more interesting than you think | Canada | News | National Post

Blood, sex & greed: Canadian history is more interesting than you think | Canada | News | National Post | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Canadians, it turns out, like when their history is told well.

Ask Trent University history professor John Milloy, and he will tell you Canadians have been “much too polite” about their history.

 

While the FLQ was blowing up mailboxes in Quebec in the 1960s, Canada became so bent on selling an uncontroversial national narrative that it neglected all the meaty details: The hard-drinking Prime Minister who lied and cheated his way towards a cross-continental railway; anti-government rebels shot dead on Yonge Street in Toronto; voyageurs who slept their way across the frontier; and the hundreds of 1940s Vancouverites who looked the other way when authorities came for the Nakumura family next door.

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Interview with Neil Oliver

Interview with Neil Oliver | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

I was expecting Neil Oliver to be rather stuffy, all tweed-jacket-with-leather-elbow-pads and no sense of humour. Instead, I found myself not only enthused but charmed by this vibrant Scotsman.

 

Like a nice cup of Coco!

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Alexandria built to celebrate birthday of Alexander the Great : Past Horizons Archaeology

Alexandria built to celebrate birthday of Alexander the Great : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Alexander the Great founded Alexandria in 331 BC and an examination of the topography of the city today allows the identification of the essential elements of the original urban system as it was laid out. It is suggested that the site was chosen for religious and symbolic reasons just as much as for commercial and topographic requirements.

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In search of Kublai Khan's fleet

In search of Kublai Khan's fleet | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A grandson of Genghis Khan, Kublai's realm stretched from the Pacific Ocean to the Black Sea, covering a fifth of the known world.In 1279, he became the first non-Chinese emperor, establishing the Yuan Dynasty and ruling over China, present-day Mongolia, Korea and other Asian regions. But his ambition to occupy more lands led to one of his worst defeats when he sent his warships to invade Vietnam in 1288.

 

Now, 725 years later, Australian archaeologists are helping excavate the site where the mighty Kublai Khan's invasion fleet of 400 was destroyed by the Vietnamese. They had lured the Mongols up the Bach Dang River just as the tide was starting to ebb. The Vietnam army had driven hundreds of sharpened wooden stakes into the bed of the river that were invisible at high tide; when the tide turned and began to ebb, the entire fleet was holed and sunk, captured or burnt by fire arrows.

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$450,000 In Private Donations Will Allow Excavation of Blackbeard’s Ship To Continue

$450,000 In Private Donations Will Allow Excavation of Blackbeard’s Ship To Continue | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A spur-of-the-moment donation today of $32,500 allowed the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources to meet its fund-raising goal of $450,000 to continue excavating the wreckage of the Queen Anne’s Revenge, the flagship of the legendary 18th-century pirate Blackbeard.

 

The contribution from Rita and Eric Bigham, a retired couple who divide their time between Chapel Hill and the small beach town of Beaufort, came at a special gathering at the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. NCDCR officials scheduled the assembly to announce that they were within sight of their goal and to display a few of the thousands of artifacts that have been recovered from the wreck since it was discovered in 1996.

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Ghosts of history - Then & Now, combined photos

Ghosts of history - Then & Now, combined photos | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Dutch historian Jo Teeuwisse discovered 300 negatives in a flea market and began to research the sites of the photos

 

Combined historical photos with photos showing as the same location is today. He started doing this years ago as a research tool, now hemostly does it because of a passion for history and fascination with the subject.


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Ancient village along B.C. river reveals 1,300 years of First Nations history

Ancient village along B.C. river reveals 1,300 years of First Nations history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Along the banks of B.C.'s Babine River sits an archeological treasure trove, an ancient village that may have been used as a crossroad for First Nations dating back more than 1,300 years.While the Babine Lake First Nation knew their ancestors' village was there, it's untilled ground for archeologists.

 

Before the arrival of Prof. Farid Rahemtulla and his crew from the Department of Anthropology at the University of Northern British Columbia, experts hadn't searched the site.

 

"It's just one of those places that hasn't really been explored very well in terms of archaeology," Rahemtulla said in an interview.

 

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