Archaeology News
Follow
Find
102.5K views | +3 today
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by David Connolly from World Heritage Site
Scoop.it!

A Monumental Struggle to Preserve Hagia Sophia

A Monumental Struggle to Preserve Hagia Sophia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In Istanbul, secularists and fundamentalists clash over restoring the nearly 1,500 year-old structure...

Via Eliza Martin
more...
Eliza Martin's comment, February 22, 2013 9:05 PM
this is an amzing websit
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Experts visit ancient boat site at Kuakata

Experts visit ancient boat site at Kuakata | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A team of archaeologists accompanied by high officials from Dhaka and Patuakhali yesterday examined the site of the historic boat, found under the sand in Kuakata beach on June 7 this year, to chalk out a technical strategy for salvation of the boat by February 2013.

As the team led by Director General of the Department of Archaeology Begum Shirin Akhtar reached the spot, about 1.5 kilometres east of Kuakata Zero Point, they found the 72-foot-long and 22.5-foot-wide boat covered with sand. They conducted digging, revealing a part of the wooden structure.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Cave used to bury the dead contained a mummified dog

Cave used to bury the dead contained a mummified dog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A naturally mummified dog is among 2500 objects that are undergoing conservation after being taken into the National Collection in Mexico...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ancient Roman Tunnels for Pagan god Mithra to Open to Public

Ancient Roman Tunnels for Pagan god Mithra to Open to Public | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The city of Rome has announced that it plans to soon allow the public to tour ancient tunnels for the pagan god Mithra, which it has been restoring for some time.

 

The tunnels are said to be located under the Baths of Caracalla, and are separate from the Mithraeum, which was discovered last year. The Mithraeum was reportedly found with a fresco of the pagan god on the wall, and also a space for what is believed to be an area for animal sacrifices.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Investigating the works of Byzantine historiographer Ioannes Malalas

Investigating the works of Byzantine historiographer Ioannes Malalas | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A comprehensive 12-year investigation headed by Tübingen historian, Professor Mischa Meier into the Chronographia of the Byzantine historiographer Ioannes Malalas...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Tales from the Jarash hinterland

Tales from the Jarash hinterland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Jarash Hinterland Survey has now been completed and the directors Fiona Baker and David Kennedy relate the team's journey over three seasons in Jordan...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Recording a Roman Floor

Recording a Roman Floor | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Last week we detailed how our archaeologists uncovered a Roman tessellated floor (at break-neck speed). But taking the soil off of a feature is only the beginning. Before it can be fully excavated ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ottawa researcher’s firing derails Viking project

Ottawa researcher’s firing derails Viking project | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

This should be the best of times for Pat Sutherland. November’s issue of National Geographic magazine and a documentary airing Thursday night on CBC’s The Nature of Things both highlight research the Ottawa archeologist has been doing in the Canadian Arctic .

 

If Sutherland is right, Norse seafarers — popularly known as Vikings — built an outpost on Baffin Island, now called Nanook, centuries before Columbus blundered on to North America. Moreover, there’s evidence they traded with the Dorset, the Arctic’s ancient, now-vanished inhabitants, for as many as 400 years.

 

But Sutherland’s pleasure at the recognition her discoveries are receiving has been sharply tempered by a harsh reality. Last April, even as the documentary about her work was being filmed, the 63-year-old, then curator of Arctic archeology at the Canadian Museum of Civilization, was abruptly dismissed from her job.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

High precision dating of Polynesian settlement

High precision dating of Polynesian settlement | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A research team have significantly narrowed down the time frame during which the last major chapter in human colonisation, the Polynesian triangle, occurred...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Cave of the Monkeys: Photos Reveal Early Modern Human Remains

Cave of the Monkeys: Photos Reveal Early Modern Human Remains | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Researchers unearth the oldest human bones from Asia.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Handaxe -Trust or Lust

Handaxe -Trust or Lust | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Trust rather than lust is at the heart of the attention to detail and finely made form of handaxes from around 1.7 million years ago, according to a University of York researcher.

 

Dr Penny Spikins, from the Department of Archaeology, suggests a desire to prove their trustworthiness, rather than a need to demonstrate their physical fitness as a mate, was the driving force behind the fine crafting of handaxes by Homo erectus/ergaster in the Lower Palaeolithic period.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Charcoal clues to rich woodland

Charcoal clues to rich woodland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Analysis of charcoal at the site of a suspected Bronze Age "sauna" suggests the surrounding area hosted a rich and diverse woodland.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ministry of Defence | Defence News | History and Honour | One hundred objects to symbolise First World War in the air

Ministry of Defence | Defence News | History and Honour | One hundred objects to symbolise First World War in the air | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
With the centenary of the First World War just 18 months away, the RAF Museum is asking members of the public what objects from its archives they would like to see on display to explain the role of aviation in this momentous event.

 

The most popular items voted for by the public will be selected for a new permanent exhibition highlighting the personal experiences of the young men and women of the newly-formed Royal Air Force (and its parent organisations the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service) and their contribution to the Allied victory.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The evolution of cooperative behaviour

The evolution of cooperative behaviour | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Human behaviour is a product of two different and interacting processes: genetic evolution and cultural evolution. A new study shows we are more inclined to cooperate than our closest evolutionary ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture

The Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture identifies, records and publishes in a consistent format, English sculpture dating from the 7th to the 11th centuries. Much of this material was previously unpublished, and is of crucial importance in helping identify the earliest settlements and artistic achievements of the Anglo-Saxon/Pre-Norman English. The Corpus documents the earliest Christian field monuments from free-standing carved crosses and innovative decorative elements and furnishings of churches, to humble grave-markers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Why are there two different spellings: archaeology and archeology?

Why are there two different spellings: archaeology and archeology? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Why are there two different spellings: archaeology and archeology? Both spellings are correct, but there are some twists and turns to the answer! If you look up the word in a dictionary, you’ll find it under “archaeology” with the variant “e” spelling also listed, but you probably won’t find it under “archeology.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Mexican silver made it into English coins | Earth | Science News

Mexican silver made it into English coins | Earth | Science News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Chemical studies of old English coins are helping unravel a centuries-old mystery: What happened to all the silver that Spaniards dug out of the New World?

 

Silver from Mexican mines started being incorporated into English coins around the mid-1550s, a new study shows. But silver from the legendary Potosí mines, in what is now Bolivia, didn’t show up until nearly a century later, researchers report online November 6 in Geology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Ancient human remains found at Machu Picchu

Ancient human remains found at Machu Picchu | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Recently excavated human remains discovered by archaeologists at Machu Picchu in Peru are being tested in the hope they will reveal further insights into the ancient people that used to live in the region.

 

Some of the remains are thought to date back to an ancient tribe which ruled the region before the famous Incas - the Killke tribe.

more...
Suzon et Marie - hypokhâgne lycée Fauriel's curator insight, April 13, 2013 8:27 AM

Quand le travail des archéologues paie : une courte vidéo pour les suivre quelques instants dans leur travail.

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Monstrous ichtyocentaurs and Nereids in Plotinopolis | Αρχαιολογία Online

Monstrous ichtyocentaurs and Nereids in Plotinopolis | Αρχαιολογία Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The finds that came to light during this year’s excavations at the hill of Aghia Petra, in Didymoteicho, which has been identified with the ancient Plotinopolis, a Roman city founded by the Roman Emperor Traianus, who named the town after his wife Plotini, are once again impressive.

 

The archaeological interest of the hill has been recognized as early as before World War II, while in 1965 a golden forged bust of Roman Emperor Septimius Severus was found there. In Aghia Petra, systematic excavations were conducted by the 19th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities in 1977 and the early 1980s.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Workers unearth Tipu-British era cannon in Bangalore

Workers unearth Tipu-British era cannon in Bangalore | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Workers involved in excavating earth at the City Market underground metro site were in for a surprise on Thursday morning when they discovered a cannon and a solitary cannonball, believed to be from the 18th Century Tipu-British era. The construction site falls between Tipu Sultan’s summer palace and the Bangalore Fort.

 

The iron cannon, 12 feet long, is estimated to be weigh between 1.5 tonnes to 2 tonnes. The cannonball is made of stone. They were found at a depth of around 4 metres from the ground in front of Victoria Hospital in Kalasipalya. The station work is part of the Namma Metro North-South corridor, being implemented by the Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Ltd.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Killing time the Viking way!

Killing time the Viking way! | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A new study uses archaeological evidence and carefully researched Viking sagas to describe how the men killed time when they were in mood for entertainment...

 

Life in the Viking Age was tough, but their lives were not without leisure. A new study by Leszek Gardela uses archaeological evidence and carefully researched Viking sagas to describe how the men killed time when they were in mood for entertainment.

 

Many of the physical games which entertained Vikings were violent and served as ways of demonstrating masculine qualities and according to written accounts, an ideal man had to be strong and skillful, with games playing a part in the training.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Famed Winged Sea Horse Brooch in Germany, to be returned, minister says

Famed Winged Sea Horse Brooch in Germany, to be returned, minister says | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay has announced that the Winged Sea Horse Brooch, one of the most precious pieces in the Croesus Treasure, which was stolen from a museum in Turkey in 2005, has been found in Germany and will be returned to Turkey soon.

 

The brooch was discovered to have been stolen from the Uşak Archaeology Museum, where it had been on display, and switched with a fake some time between March and August 2005, and it remained missing until located in Germany. No information has yet been revealed as to how it was found. The brooch was declared the symbol of the city by the municipality of Uşak after it was stolen.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeo News Podcast 217

Archaeo News Podcast 217 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Stone Pages with BAJR and Past Horizons presents the long running archaeology based podcast with the latest archaeology news, mainly related to prehistory, megalithic monuments and discoveries.

Enjoy the velvet tones of your truely 

In collaboration with Stonepages, British Archaeological Jobs Resource and Past Horizons

 

First Polynesians arrived in Tonga 2,800 years ago
Up the fjord without a paddle
Ancient Temple Found in Israel
Genetic tests prove that Oetzi was Central Europe native
An 8,500-year-old murder mystery
Excavations at the largest Neolithic site in China
‘Oldest Mayan tomb’ found in Guatemala
Stone triumphs over wind

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Renaissance warrior's tomb is opened — and so is a mystery

Renaissance warrior's tomb is opened — and so is a mystery | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A noble-but-brutal Renaissance warrior who fell to a battle wound may not have died exactly as historians had believed, according to a new investigation of the man's bones.

 

Italian researchers opened the tomb of Giovanni dalle Bande Nere, or Giovanni of the Black Bands, this week to investigate the real cause of his death. Giovanni was born in 1598 into the wealthy and influential Medici family, a lineage that produced four Popes and two regent queens of France, among many other nobles.

 

He worked as a mercenary military captain for Pope Leo X (one of the Medici family's Popes), and fought many a successful skirmish in his name. When Pope Leo X died in 1521, Giovanni altered his uniform to include black mourning bands, earning him his nickname.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Villagers go back to Iron Age for project - Local stories - Yorkshire Post

YORKSHIRE archaeologists are about to start to build a replica Iron Age roundhouse of the type inhabited by our ancestors over 2,000 years ago.

 

The circular house is being built at Great Hucklow, a Derbyshire Peak district village, in a project led by Sheffield University archaeologists.

 

It will become a place where schoolchildren and others can learn about life in Iron Age Britain, which ended when the Romans arrived.

more...
No comment yet.