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Hierakonpolis website redesign

Hierakonpolis website redesign | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The website has been totally redesigned and contains a lot of new information about the site of Hierakonpolis and its place in the predynastic history of Egypt, as well as later times.

Discover the results of the recent fieldwork of the Hierakonpolis Expedition and the history of the site, or browse the comprehensive bibliography of Hierakonpolis! You even have a chance to become a Friend of Nekhen and help support the work of the Expedition in rediscovering, recording and conserving one of the most important sites in predynastic Egypt.

David Connolly's insight:

Hierakonpolis, the City of the Hawk, ancient Egyptian Nekhen, is one of the most important archaeological sites for understanding the foundations of ancient Egyptian society.

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Why the stuff you don't see at the museum matters

Why the stuff you don't see at the museum matters | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Chicago's Field Museum isn't just a science museum. It's also a research center, especially for archaeologists and anthropologists who come to the museum to make use of its extensive collections of artifacts — only a tiny fraction of which is on public display at any given time.

 

Unfortunately, the museum is currently up to its neck in debt, and part of the current administrators' plan to deal with that problem is to restructure the research department and cut back on curators and staffing there.It's hard to understand why this has the archaeology community so on edge unless you really understand what the Field Museum has in those vast Indiana-Jones-inspiring storage collections. Here's Michael Smith, an archaeologist who studies the ancient Aztecs, explaining why the Field Museum is so important to his work and that of his colleagues.

David Connolly's insight:

This is an important point to make - the museum storerooms are not dusty places where nothing happens.   and one into the box, the object is never seen again.  

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Bust of Memnon: Images of Blacks in Ancient Greece

Bust of Memnon: Images of Blacks in Ancient Greece | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Image of the Week: Learn about this bust of Memnon, protégé of the Athenian philosopher Herodes Atticus.

This marvelous bust is one of the very few documents of an actual black person from Greek and Roman antiquity. Memnon was a pupil and protégé of the well-known Athenian entrepreneur and philosopher Herodes Atticus.

 

It was found more than a century ago in one of several villas owned by Herodes, and it adds a face to the name of the person recorded by Philostratus in his Lives of the Sophists, an account of the famous philosophers of the second century.

 

The exact circumstances of Memnon's entry into this celebrated milieu are unknown, but there is no doubt about the esteem in which he was held. He was given the sobriquet "Memnon" in reference to the Ethiopian ally of the Trojans in Homer's Iliad. Philostratus and other sources record the extreme grief manifested by Herodes upon the early death of Memnon.

David Connolly's insight:

A fascinating glimpse into a little studied interation between black Africa and the Mediterranean world

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Israeli dig uncovers ancient Judaean temple - Hindustan Times

Israeli dig uncovers ancient Judaean temple - Hindustan Times | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Israeli archaeologists have uncovered a rare temple and religious figurines dating back to the Judaean period nearly 3,000 years ago, Israel's Antiquities Authority said on Wednesday.
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Erratic Environment May Be Key to Human Evolution

Erratic Environment May Be Key to Human Evolution | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Dramatic changes in the cradle of humanity linked to key mental developments.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
David Connolly's insight:

Well  this will do until the next theory!    ;)

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Babylon 612BC

reconstruction of ancient Babylon, 612 BC (6 (nice) minute digital tour of the ancient city of Babylon.)...

Via Rebeca BM
David Connolly's insight:

Love these animations that bring dust back to life.

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Who created Las Labradas petroglyphs? : Past Horizons Archaeology

Who created Las Labradas petroglyphs? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Fifty miles north of Mazatlan in Sinaloa State, north west Mexico, there is a beach known as Las Labradas where the rocks are covered in over 600 petroglyphs. Now Mexican investigators have uncovered archaeological sites in the vicinity dating to the Archaic period (2500-1000 BCE) along with another later site that may provide clues to the creators of the Las Labradas petroglyphs.

David Connolly's insight:

Every so often you come across a site that you wonder...  why do more people not know about this!   Stunning location and stunning rock art!  

Read on!

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6 Mind-Blowing Archeological Discoveries Destroyed by Idiocy

6 Mind-Blowing Archeological Discoveries Destroyed by Idiocy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Here are some of the worst reasons that priceless artifacts have ever been destroyed.
David Connolly's insight:

Although toungue in cheek, it does show that after hundreds of years we still do care more about ourselves than the past.   though we do like to pretend ;)

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Eastern Turkey’s ancient wonders : Past Horizons Archaeology

Eastern Turkey’s ancient wonders : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Given the power to travel in time, which period would you choose for your tour? Well, here’s one to consider: the early Holocene. Not grabbing you? Well, to be more precise 9,600BC in what is now eastern Turkey. That period and place are known to have been pivotal in human prehistory, although they left precious few traces.

It was during this time that certain plants and animals were domesticated, which led to the farming revolution and permanent changes in human technology, culture and diet. It was the moment, in short, when humanity started on the inexorable ascent towards pot noodles and oven chips. What better moment could there be to delve into? And now, thanks to some incredible recent discoveries close to the ancient city of Urfa (officially now Sanlıurfa, but usually called simply Urfa), we have a tangible physical trace of that momentous turning point in humanity’s development.

David Connolly's insight:

One of the most amazing sites in the world.  

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Syrian museums looted and antiquities traded for arms

Syrian museums looted and antiquities traded for arms | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Reports have emerged from Syria of looted museums, damaged heritage sites and the trade of antiquities for arms.

The Independent reported that government museums at Deir ez-Zor, Raqqa, Maarat al-Numan and Qalaat Jaabar had been looted.

The newspaper also quoted Syrian director of museums Hiba Sakhel, who said items from the National Museum of Aleppo had been moved to the vaults of the central bank in Damascus for safekeeping.

Sources in Syria are also reporting looting at museums in Homs and Hama, while a recent report in Time magazine found evidence of a trade in arms for antiquities on the Lebanese border.

David Connolly's insight:

Very worrying reports.   Would like to see more information on this. 

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Yamagata University opens research center in Peru to study Nazca Lines

Yamagata University opens research center in Peru to study Nazca Lines | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient geoglyphs located in the high desert of southern Peru have long puzzled scientists and anthropologists. They want to know who drew the Nazca Lines, and why.
David Connolly's insight:

interesting - given the work down by Ruggles et al.  !

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Photos: Nature, Thieves and Vandals Leave Their Mark On The Historic Persepolis Ruins

Photos: Nature, Thieves and Vandals Leave Their Mark On The Historic Persepolis Ruins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Founded by Darius I in 518 B.C., Persepolis was the capital of the Achaemenid Empire. It was built on an immense half-artificial, half-natural terrace, where the king of kings created an impressive palace complex inspired by Mesopotamian models. The importance and quality of the monumental ruins make it a unique archaeological site.

David Connolly's insight:

Was privileged to be here...  and it is a remarkable site.

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Effort to return Hopi artifacts stirs questions

Effort to return Hopi artifacts stirs questions | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
On an unknown date at an unidentified location, the U.S. government turned over a collection of undisclosed Sinagua artifacts to anonymous members of the Hopi Tribe for unspecified disposition.

 

The mysterious proceedings this fall involved an archaeological treasure trove and a substantial expenditure of tax dollars. Yet virtually everything about it remains secret under a federal law known as the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, or NAGPRA.

David Connolly's insight:

Here there must be questions asked?

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About Ordnance Survey, Britain's national mapping agency

About Ordnance Survey, Britain's national mapping agency | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Two revolutions link the history of Ordnance Survey. The first engulfed France during the late eighteenth century – with Britain fearing invasion as a result. The second sees us at the heart of the ongoing digital revolution, with web mapping services and geographic information transforming business and public services.

It was back in 1791, whilst planning defences to repel any invasion, that the Government realised the South Coast of England needed to be comprehensively and accurately mapped. So it instructed its Board of Ordnance – the defence ministry of the day – to carry out the necessary survey work.

That historic decision led to the mapping of the whole country in detail, and is also the source of the intriguing name 'Ordnance Survey'.

Today Ordnance Survey is a dynamic, self-financing £120-million-a-year civilian organisation. We’re at the forefront of the digital economy, producing digital mapping products and paper maps for business, leisure, administrative and educational use. We are still part of the UK Government, but we cover our costs by selling our products and licensing others to use our data.

Since 1999 we have had government 'Trading Fund' status, giving us more responsibility for our own finances and planning and more freedom to develop new initiatives.

 

David Connolly's insight:

If you would like to read more about their history, read these books online:

A History of the Ordnance Survey edited by W. A. Seymour (434 pages)

Map-makers to Britain since 1791 by Tim Owen and Elaine Pilbeam (206 pages)

Free!

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Roman gravestone in mosque

ARCHAEOLOGY - Roman gravestone in mosque | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A grave stone from the Roman period has been found in the grave of a Muslim judge, in the garden of a mosque in the Kadı village of the Black Sea province of Kastamonu’s Taşköprü district.

David Connolly's insight:

Short and sweet.!

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Ancient beer breweries hint at alcohol's age-old appeal

Ancient beer breweries hint at alcohol's age-old appeal | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
As people ring in the New Year with dancing and a bit of bubbly, they can consider themselves part of an ancient human tradition.

 

Several new archaeological finds suggest that alcohol has been a social glue in parties, from work festivals to cultic feasts, since the dawn of civilization.

In the December issue of the journal Antiquity, archaeologists describe evidence of nearly 11,000-year-old beer brewing troughs at a cultic feasting site in Turkey called Göbekli Tepe.

 

Archaeologists in Cyprus have unearthed the 3,500-year-old ruins of what may have been a primitive beer brewery and feasting hall at a site called Kissonerga-Skalia.

 

The excavation, described in the November issue of the journal Levant, revealed several kilns that may have been used to dry malt before fermentation.

David Connolly's insight:

I foresee some more research this year about culture and the relationship with beer and spirits

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Archaeological site in Shinas unearthed | Oman Observer

Archaeological site in Shinas unearthed | Oman Observer | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A team of archaeologists at the Ministry of Heritage and Culture managed to unearth an archaeological site at the Aswad border Check Point area in the Wilayat of Shinas in North Al Batinah Governorate. The site includes a settlement and an archaeological symmetry that dates back to 2000 BC (Wadi Souq era) as per the archaeological surveys conducted by the ministry.

David Connolly's insight:

Now there is a place to visit for 2013 on the old smuggling routes!

I used to pop over.   bet it is harder now! 

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History of Ancient Rome

David Connolly's insight:

This is how you can use Prezi to inform and educate.   move away from the standard Powerpoint and think about other ways to engage the audience!

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Laura Dean's curator insight, May 1, 2013 9:23 PM

A great visual and interactive presentation of ancient roman history. 

Emily Brown's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:44 PM

This source briefly describes the important events in Ancient Rome. This should give you the basic understanding of Ancient Rome before we go into more detail about these events in this unit. 

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Maharashtra's ancient rock sculptures - The Times of India

Maharashtra's ancient rock sculptures - The Times of India | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Rock sculptures dating back to between 4,000-7,000 BC have been found in a well-preserved condition in the forests near Kudopi village in Sindhudurg district of coastal Konkan region, an official said here Tuesday.

There are more than 60 big and small images of Mother Goddess, birds and animals, found in a single location of around 20,000 square feet, considered one of the biggest such concentration anywhere in the country, Satish Lalit, leader of an expedition team which made the discovery last May, said.

"Though similar carvings have been found in other parts of India, this is the first find on a red soil laterite plateau. These are petro-glyphs unlike the picto-graphs found in places like Amravati," Lalit, a member of Rock Art Society of India ( RASI), said.

David Connolly's insight:

Get past the the dodgy comments about 15-foot tall Mother Goddess with all the internationally known symbols indicating her status.  and there is a fascinating story here:   with signs that rock art in general is being generally recognised around the world.

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100 years ago: When an Egyptian mummy turns out to be a fraud

100 years ago: When an Egyptian mummy turns out to be a fraud | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Originally published in the Manchester Guardian on 31 December 1912: The Egyptians were perhaps the earliest taxidermists; they made mummies of hawks
David Connolly's insight:

But did they decide to bypass the actual need for a bird inside the wrappings?  

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Top Twelve stories of 2012 : Past Horizons Archaeology

Top Twelve stories of 2012 : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The top twelve of 2012. 

Archaeology has been covered with over 700 artciles last year.   but what made it to the top 12?

 

 

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Oldest Known Depiction of Pharaoh Found : Discovery News

Oldest Known Depiction of Pharaoh Found : Discovery News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Dating back more than 5,000 years, the rock drawings represent the earliest depictions of royal power in Egypt.
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‘An Iliad’: An ancient war story for our time

‘An Iliad’: An ancient war story for our time | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

At Studio Theatre, the retelling of Homer’s “The Iliad” as a one-man play explores the power of rage.

 

The Trojan War took 10 years to fight and had its origins, years before, on the day Zeus set his sights on a pretty young thing, turned himself into a swan, knocked her up and fathered a half-divine, half-human daughter named Helen, the girl with the ship-launching face. But the Iliad doesn’t start there. Its early pages take readers to the final few weeks of combat.

David Connolly's insight:

This is a remarkable review of a new telling of the story, with resonance in the new age we are in

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Colombia residents want Germany to return stone statues

Colombia residents want Germany to return stone statues | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
early a century ago, Konrad Preuss did pioneering work in Colombia's most important archaeological zone, called San Agustin. But the Germanarchaeologist also took 35 stone statues back to Germany, and now residents of the southern Colombian region where he worked have mounted a campaign to get them back.

 

About 1,800 residents of the Andean community of the San Agustin region signed a petition this month in a grass-roots effort to urge Colombia's government to make a formal request for the return of the intriguing artifacts. Some of the statues are on display and others are in storage at the Ethnological Museum in Berlin's Dahlem neighborhood.

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