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Archaeologists baffled by eight-ton, 2,000-year-old animal statue discovered at excavation site in heart of panda territory

Archaeologists baffled by eight-ton, 2,000-year-old animal statue discovered at excavation site in heart of panda territory | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A giant stone animal has been found at an excavation site in Chengdu, southwestern China, baffling archaeologists as to what it may be.

The mysterious rock beast was unearthed in the capital of Sichuan province today and is thought to be 2,000 years old.

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Heap of cattle bones may mark ancient feasts -- Sott.net

Heap of cattle bones may mark ancient feasts -- Sott.net | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A metric ton of cattle bones found in an abandoned theater in the ancient city of Corinth may mark years of lavish feasting, a new study finds.
David Connolly's insight:

and that is only a small part of the total of discarded bone

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American Journalist Sets Off For 7-Year, Around-The-World Walk

American Journalist Sets Off For 7-Year, Around-The-World Walk | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
On the eve of an unimaginably long walk – one that starts in Africa, winds through the Middle East, across Asia, hops over to Alaska, goes down the western United States, then Central and South America and ends in Chile – one question nagged journalist Paul Salopek: Should he take his house keys?

Salopek on Thursday departed a small Ethiopian village and took the first steps of a planned 21,000-mile (34,000-kilometer) walk that will cross some 30 borders, where he will encounter dozens of languages and scores of ethnic groups. The 50-year-old's quest is to retrace man's first migration from Africa across the world in a go-slow journey that will force him to immerse himself in a variety of cultures so he can tell a global mosaic of people stories.

The Ethiopia-to-Chile walk – which took human ancestors some 50,000 years to make – is called Out of Eden and is sponsored by National Geographic, the Knight Foundation and the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. A two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, the American plans to write one major article a year with periodic updates every 100 miles or so.

David Connolly's insight:

Walk on!    still...  seven years is better than 50,000!  

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Wiped out by a raging river: 3,000-year-old bridge is washed away

Wiped out by a raging river: 3,000-year-old bridge is washed away | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The clapper bridge Tarr Steps in Exmoor, Somerset, is the latest landmark to be hit by the weeks of downpours after its cables were snapped by trees being swept downstream.

 

The River Barle in Somerset swelled so much that it destroyed the ‘Tarr Steps’ –  a Grade I listed ancient monument formed of massive stones weighing up to two tons apiece. The slabs, some measuring 8ft long, were swept away as downed trees crashed into them.

Local resident Martin Hesp said: ‘I have lived in the area for over 50 years and I have never seen anything like this before.

 
David Connolly's insight:

ouch!!

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Small Tool Kit

Small Tool Kit | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The small tool kit is a perfect little set for holding your archaeology small tools with room to spare for pens, pencils and wooden tools as well.
David Connolly's insight:

In a tough blue roll with rubberised padding, this is a great little tool roll.

This comes complete with Past Horizons best selling small tool set, which has been a favourite since we first introduced it.

A quality tool roll, with some quality tools.   What more could you ask for.

Past Horizons - The trusted supplier of Archaeology Trowels - Archaeology Equipment - Archaeology Tools

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The Predatory Nature of Settler Colonialism Set in Stone

The Predatory Nature of Settler Colonialism Set in Stone | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
As I consider the settler history of the state of Colorado, I am frustrated with the continued glorification of early settlers and perpetuation of the grand narrative in dominant literature, especially in reference to the Sand Creek Massacre.
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Byzantine Chapel found beneath Turkish river mud

Byzantine Chapel found beneath Turkish river mud | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The excellent condition of a newly discovered 13th-century chapel has stirred hopes among archaeologists that an entire city may be largely intact underground.

 

After some 800 years as an important pilgrimage site in the Byzantine Empire it vanished — buried under 18 feet of mud from the rampaging Myros River.

 

But now, 700 years later, Myra is reappearing.

 

Archaeologists first detected the ancient city in 2009 using ground-penetrating radar that revealed anomalies whose shape and size suggested walls and buildings. Over the next two years they excavated a small, stunning 13th-century chapel sealed in an uncanny state of preservation. Carved out of one wall is a cross that, when sunlit, beams its shape onto the altar.

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Find of Roman statues 'important'

Find of Roman statues 'important' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Italy say they have discovered what they've called a "very important" series of statues dating back to the Roman era, linked to the celebrated poet Ovid.

 

The seven figures were found in a villa outside the city owned by the patron of the celebrated poet, Ovid.

They depict one of the myths recounted in his masterpiece, Metamorphoses, that of the proud mother Niobe.

The team unearthed the 2m-high figures at the bottom of what would have been a richly-decorated swimming pool.

 

David Connolly's insight:

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

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Louise Zarmati's curator insight, January 8, 2013 7:04 PM

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

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Two arrested in Fayoum for possession of artifacts

Two arrested in Fayoum for possession of artifacts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Two suspects were arrested for the illegal possession of 50 ancient Egyptian artefacts in Fayoum on Thursday.
David Connolly's insight:

This is what you need to see...   robbers being arrested...  the next part is not to loot in the first place!

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.:Middle East Online::Ancient gold coins discovered in Iraq:.

.:Middle East Online::Ancient gold coins discovered in Iraq:. | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

raqi archaeologists have found 66 gold coins that are at least 1,400 years old, officials said on Monday, adding that they hope to put them on display in Baghdad's National Museum.

The artefacts, which date back to the Sassanid era that extended from 225 BC to 640 AD, will be sent for laboratory tests in order to confirm their authenticity.

They were discovered in the town of Aziziyah, which lies 70 kilometres (40 miles) southeast of Baghdad in Wasit province, according to Hassanian Mohammed Ali, director of the provincial antiquities department.

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New dates refine Australian timeline : Past Horizons Archaeology

New dates refine Australian timeline : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Nyiyaparli Traditional Owners from the Pilbara region of Western Australia recently announced the dates for the oldest occupation ever found in the area.

Oldest known occupation in the Pilbara

The Nyiyaparli Heritage Sub-Committee and Karlka Nyiyaparli Aboriginal Corporation working with archaeologists from the heritage company Archae-aus evaluated a rock shelter in the area as part of a larger survey.  The samples of charcoal retrieved along with artefacts were analysed using carbon-dating techniques and returned a date that amazed the  archaeologists – the layer of occupation was 41,230 calendar years old (ka).

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Deep Time at Tall Hisban

Tall Hisban is an archaeological ruin between Madaba and Amman, Jordan. While the complete story of its history and how it interacts with the present day des...
David Connolly's insight:

spellbinding way to envisage an archaeological site.

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Louise Zarmati's comment, January 7, 2013 4:57 PM
David, you find the best stuff! Thanks for trawling the web so diligently.
David Connolly's comment, January 7, 2013 5:07 PM
Thank you very much. I love spending a peaceful breakfast learning about what is new for the day!
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18th-century 'Aristotle' sex manual to be auctioned next week - Telegraph

18th-century 'Aristotle' sex manual to be auctioned next week - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A once-banned book on sex and pregnancy from the 18th century is expected to fetch up to £400 when it goes on sale in Edinburgh next week.

 

Aristotle’s Complete Master-Piece is a manual which is thought to have provided information for amateur midwives and young married couples about pregnancy and sex. It is up sale at Edinburgh auction house, Lyon & Turnbull on 9 January, where it is expected to reach up to £400.

 

Despite its title, the manual has little to do with Greek philosophy according to Lyon & Turnbull’s book specialist Cathy Marsden.

 

Instead, the anonymous author of the Master-Piece offers dubious 17th century advice - it was first published in 1684, cobbled together from the works of Nicholas Culpepper, Albertus Magnus and, Marsden says, “a good dose of old wife’s tale”.

David Connolly's insight:

dubious 17th century adviceon sex...  what could possibly go wrong??

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Roman research project has become the passion of a lifetime - Scotland / News / The Courier

Roman research project has become the passion of a lifetime - Scotland / News / The Courier | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

WHEN DR David J Wooliscroft and his colleagues began their study into the Roman Empire’s first land frontier, they believed they had enough work to last three or four years.

The sheer scale of the archaeological remains left behind in Scotland has now left the eminent archaeologist convinced the project will outlive him.

The team working on The Roman Gask Project will return to Perthshire and Angus this year in the hope of completing just one element of their investigations.

Experience has already told them that each visit to the regions’ legionary fortresses, fort camps and signal stations will only raise further questions about the occupation between 43 and 410 AD.

David Connolly's insight:

The fabulous Gask project.   The Roman Gask Project  
Romaes far frontier

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Ancient tombs unearthed in Egypt

Ancient tombs unearthed in Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Egypt's antiquities ministry says Italian archaeologists have unearthed tombs in the southern Egyptian city of Luxor that are more than 3,000 years old.

 

Egypt's antiquities ministry says the tombs were found under the mortuary temple of the Pharoah Amenhotep II, who reigned from 1427 BC to 1401 BC.

The temple is located on the western bank of the River Nile.

The ministry said remains of wooden sarcophagi and human bones were found inside the tombs.

Jars used to preserve the liver, lungs, stomach and intestines of the deceased were also found, decorated with images of the four sons of the god Horus.

David Connolly's insight:

Still sites to find in Egypt 

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AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Diyala Archaeological Database (DiyArDa)

AWOL - The Ancient World Online: Diyala Archaeological Database (DiyArDa) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Diyala Database, for the first time, publishes all archaeological materials from the Diyala Expedition, one of the most important excavation projects ever undertaken in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). 

The current version of this database, using OracleTM as a backend, represents a partial release of these data. Future releases will add and update object descriptions and provide new interfaces with additional links to site photographs, field notes, diary entries, and architectural plans.

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Ancient Maya Predicted 1991 Solar Eclipse

Ancient Maya Predicted 1991 Solar Eclipse | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Mayan astronomers accurately mapped the movements of heavenly bodies.

 

A new book, "Astronomy in the Maya Codices" (American Philosophical Society, 2011), which was awarded the Osterbrock Book Prize for historical astronomy here at the American Astronomical Society conference Monday (Jan. 7), details a series of impressive observations made by Mayan astronomers  pre-16th century.

 

Anthropologist husband-wife team, Harvey and Victoria Bricker have devoted their lives to understanding the pre-Columbian Maya and how they understood the world around them. The Brickers conducted most of their work by translating complex hieroglyphics to see what Mayan scribes felt was most important to record on parchment.

 

 

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Teotihuacans used cosmetics as part of after-death ritual : Past Horizons Archaeology

Teotihuacans used cosmetics as part of after-death ritual : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In collaboration with the National University of Mexico, a team of Spanish researchers has analysed for the first time remains of cosmetics in the graves of prehispanic civilisations on the American continent. In the case of the Teotihuacans, these cosmetics were used as part of the after-death ritual to honour their city’s most important people.

A research team from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the University of Valencia has studied various funerary samples found in urns in the Teotihuacan archaeological site (Mexico) that date from between 200 and 500 AD.

The scientists have been researching Mayan wall paintings in Mexico and Guatemala since 2006. Published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, this project came about after contact on various occasions with other researchers in the area, namely the National University of Mexico, who wanted to know the composition and function of the cosmetics found in pots.

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RESCUE DOG BECOMES FIRST ARCHEOLOGY DOG

RESCUE DOG BECOMES FIRST ARCHEOLOGY DOG | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Migaloo is a rescue dog with a special talent. Her owner, Australian dog owner Gary Jackson, trained this black lab-Mastiff mix to become the first “Archeology Dog”, able to sniff out bones that are hundreds of years old.
David Connolly's insight:

No really!

But we ain't selling this at Past Horizons! 

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Ancient pill ingredients probed

Ancient pill ingredients probed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Medicine that is more than 2,000 years old has been analysed by scientists.

Six tablets were discovered in a tin box onboard an ancient Roman shipwreck, found off the coast of Italy.

Samples of the fragile material revealed that the pharmaceuticals contained animal and plant fats, pine resin and zinc compounds.

Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers said the medicine might have been used to treat eye infections.

"I am surprised by the fact we have found so many ingredients and they were very well preserved considering it was under water for so much time," said Maria Perla Colombini, professor of chemistry from the University of Pisa.

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Roman kids showed off status with shoes

Roman kids showed off status with shoes | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Even on the farthest-flung frontiers of the ancient Roman Empire, the footwear made the man ­— and the kid.  Children and infants living in and around Roman military bases around the first century wore shoes that revealed the kids' social status,...
David Connolly's insight:

No change !

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Keeping our digital cultural heritage alive : Past Horizons Archaeology

Keeping our digital cultural heritage alive : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Remember those early days of computer games and consoles? Keeping digital ‘treasures’ like Super Mario and Pacman for posterity is a huge technical challenge. And the same issues apply to the high-end business software of yesteryear. But thanks to an EU-funded project, we now have tools that will enable access to obsolete software long into the future.

Thanks to the systematic activities of libraries, museums and national archives, much of our digital heritage is well preserved. Many copies of legacy software, from early video games to high-end professional software suites, have been collected as artefacts of the digital age.

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Trespassers 'scar' 2400 BC mound

Trespassers 'scar' 2400 BC mound | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Trespassers on a rain-soaked monument in Wiltshire are causing "spectacular" damage, an archaeologist has warned.

Heavy rain has led to standing water around Silbury Hill in Avebury and very soft ground which is being eroded by people climbing the monument.

Jim Leary, an archaeologist for English Heritage, said that illegal climbers on the sodden hill were "leaving some really rather hideous scars".

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Najaf’s historic building gets a new lease on life | ArabNews

Najaf’s historic building gets a new lease on life | ArabNews | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

IT served as an Ottoman headquarters, a prison, an ice factory and a mill before falling into neglect. Now Najaf's historic and much loved Khan Al-Shilan is getting a new lease of life — as a museum.


Local authorities in Najaf plan to turn the structure into a museum featuring antiquities and archaeological pieces, as well as statues of rebels and some of the actual weapons they used in a 1920 Iraqi uprising against the British, during which captured soldiers were held at Khan Al-Shilan.


In addition to its long history, Khan Al-Shilan is significant due to the remains of drawings and dates left by the captive British soldiers, which are still visible on its walls.

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Gaza's archaeological treasures at risk from neglect and war

Gaza's archaeological treasures at risk from neglect and war | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
While traces of Gaza's historical past remain, the race to preserve what is left beneath the surface of this battle-scarred land is fraught with problems, as Ruqaya Izzidien reports.

 

Years of conflict have exacted a heavy toll on centuries of history in the Gaza Strip. While traces of its rich past remain, the race to preserve what is left beneath the surface of this battle-scarred land is fraught with problems, as Ruqaya Izzidien reports.

 

Settled by civilisations spanning some five millennia, Gaza has been built layer-upon-layer since the Bronze Age.

 

As each era ended, its people left behind remnants of their times - churches, monasteries, palaces and mosques, as well as thousands of precious artefacts.

David Connolly's insight:

As ever the past shows the merged blurred boundaries of humans, and it also shows that conflict is in the end futile.   Time cares nothing for causes.   A shared past should represent a shared present.

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