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Archaeo Christmas News Podcast 221 : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeo Christmas News Podcast 221 : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
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Great fun doing this!

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King Amenhotep II damaged in Egyptian Museum - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online

King Amenhotep II damaged in Egyptian Museum - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
King,Amenhotep,II,damaged,in,Egyptian,Museum,-,Ancient,Egypt,-,Heritage

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Send for the bard! Carnyx discovery leaves archaeologists little the wiser

Send for the bard! Carnyx discovery leaves archaeologists little the wiser | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In the Asterix books, Cacofonix the bard is forbidden to sing because his voice causes wild boar, villagers, Normans and Romans alike to flee. But Cacofonix does play the carnyx, a long, slender trumpet-like instrument decorated with an animal's head at the top end, and used by the Celts in the last three centuries BC.

The Greek historian Polybius (206-126BC) was so impressed by the clamour of the Gallic army and the sound of the carnyx, he observed that, "there were countless trumpeters and horn blowers and since the whole army was shouting its war cries at the same time there was such a confused sound that the noise seemed to come not only from the trumpeters and the soldiers but also from the countryside which was joining in the echo".

 

When the remains of seven carnyx were unearthed recently, Christophe Maniquet, an archaeologist at Inrap, the national institute for preventive archaeological research (Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives), was curious to find out exactly what sound it produced when it drove the Romans mad, or was used to call upon the god Toutatis.

David Connolly's insight:

Excellent article regarding this most ferocious of instruments

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Ancient Buddhas, modern peril

Ancient Buddhas, modern peril | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When the Taliban blasted the famous Bamiyan Buddhas with artillery and dynamite in March 2001, leaders of many faiths and countries denounced the destruction as an act of cultural terrorism. But today, with the encouragement of the US government, Chinese engineers are preparing a similar act of desecration in Afghanistan: the demolition of a vast complex of richly decorated ancient Buddhist monasteries.

The offense of this Afghan monument is not idolatry. Its sin is to sit atop one of the world's largest copper deposits.

The copper at the Mes Aynak mine, just an hour's drive south of Kabul, is to be extracted under a roughly $3 billion deal signed in 2007 between Afghanistan and China's Metallurgical Group Corp. The Afghan Finance Minister, Omar Zakhilwal, recently said the project could pump $300 million a year into government coffers by 2016. But the project has been plagued by rumours of corruption; there was widespread talk of a $30 million kickback involving the former minister of mines, who resigned.

David Connolly's insight:

Lest it goes out of our mind...  

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Court Ruling Preserves Caesarea's Antiquities

Court Ruling Preserves Caesarea's Antiquities | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A court ruled that plans for a new neighborhood in Caesarea would have to be put on hold because of important archaeological artifacts.
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English Heritage chief calls for tougher sentences for heritage crime - Telegraph

English Heritage chief calls for tougher sentences for heritage crime  - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Judges should impose stiffer sentences on criminals who damage historic monuments to stem the destruction of Britain’s irreplaceable cultural treasures, the chief executive of English Heritage has said.
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About time... 

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2,000-year-old Roman theatre discovered in back garden of archaeological school

2,000-year-old Roman theatre discovered in back garden of archaeological school | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a Roman theatre - dating back 2,000 years.


Dr Paul Wilkinson, founder of the Kent Archaeological Field School, believes it is the first of its kind to be found in Britain.

The theatre with a nearly circular cockpit-style orchestra, which would have seated 12,000 people. It  was found in Faversham, Kent - just behind Dr Wilkinson's back garden where his field school is based.

 

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Islamists Renew Attack On Timbuktu's Heritage

Islamists Renew Attack On Timbuktu's Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The ancient treasures of Timbuktu have come under renewed attack by Islamists, the BBC reports.

The Islamist group Ansar Dine (Defenders of Faith) has vowed to destroy all the city's medieval shrines of Muslim saints, which they say are contrary to Islam. The city in northern Mali has been under the control of a coalition of Tuareg and Islamist rebels since April. They declared the independent state of Azawad and soon fought among themselves, with the Islamists gaining the upper hand and imposing harsh Sharia law.

David Connolly's insight:

Not good news at all

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‘Fake date stone not enough to undo cultural damage’ - Local - Lurgan Mail

‘Fake date stone not enough to undo cultural damage’ - Local - Lurgan Mail | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A REPLACEMENT date stone marking the presence of a building dating back to the era of the Ulster Plantation, which was razed by developers, is not enough to undo years of ‘cultural vandalism’ to Waringstown.
David Connolly's insight:

Oh dear dear...  this seems to be another and worse blunder

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Researching submerged prehistoric archaeology - timesofmalta.com

Researching submerged prehistoric archaeology - timesofmalta.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Researchers from various academic and professional backgrounds are working together to better understand submerged prehistoric landscapes and their significance through a four-year EU-funded research network project entitled Submerged Prehistoric Archaeology and Landscapes of the Continental Shelf.

Eight project partners from six EU countries recently travelled to Malta to join representatives from the University’s Department of Classics and Archaeology to dive to some unique submerged geological features.

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Publishing Archaeology: Field Museum archaeological collections threatened

Publishing Archaeology: Field Museum archaeological collections threatened | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Field Museum of Natural History is one of the premier natural history museums in the U.S., with extensive collections in archaeology, anthropology, and many other disciplines.

 

Last week, the Museum annnounced major budget cuts and restructuring that will reduce the scientific value of its collections. The museum evidently will cut back the scope of its scientific mission (collections and basic research) in order to pay back major debts and concentrate on exhibits.

This operation will be a disaster to archaeological research in a number of ways.

David Connolly's insight:

Not a way forward that is sustainable

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Tourists damage Mayan temple during 'apocalypse' frenzy

Tourists damage Mayan temple during 'apocalypse' frenzy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Tourists flocking to Guatemala for "end of the world" parties have damaged an ancient stone temple at Tikal, the largest archeological site and urban center of the Mayan civilization.

"Sadly, many tourists climbed Temple II and caused damage," said Osvaldo Gomez, a technical adviser at the site, which is located some 550 kilometres north of Guatemala City.

"We are fine with the celebration, but (the tourists) should be more aware because this is a (UNESCO) World Heritage Site," he told local media.

 
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Portraits of women

Portraits of women | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Reblogged from Faces&Voices: Manchester Museum inv. 2266 (Hawara, Fayum, 138-160 AD) The woman is wearing a purple tunic maybe similar to that of the daughter of Herakleos (P.Ryl. 151)© The Man...


Via Rene Nieuwenhuizen
David Connolly's insight:

I love these portraits of the past.   really looking into the eyes of a real person

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Botosani Archaeological Treasures Come to Light

Botosani Archaeological Treasures Come to Light | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have discovered a series of ancient settlements in Ripiceni-Holm site, near Botosani. Hilights include a complex of Cucutenian houses and tools.

Via Phil On The Net
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David Connolly's comment, December 28, 2012 11:23 AM
Good to hear news from other places and other times
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Dzibanché discoveries redifines the “Maya Collapse” : Past Horizons Archaeology

Dzibanché discoveries redifines the “Maya Collapse” : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A polychromatic stucco mural, referring to one of the oldest Mayan dynasties of the important city of Dzibanché, in Quintana Roo is one of the latest findings which reveals that it was inhabited well into the 13th century CE, and not the 11th century CE when it was believed the cities of the Lowlands were completely abandoned during the “Maya collapse“.

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Rebirth of the Viking warship that may have helped Canute conquer the seas : Past Horizons Archaeology

When the sleek, beautiful silhouette of Roskilde 6 appeared on the horizon, 1,000 years ago, it was very bad news. The ship was part of a fleet carrying an army of hungry, thirsty warriors, muscles toned by rowing and sailing across the North Sea; a war machine like nothing else in 11th-century Europe, its arrival meant disaster was imminent.

 

Now the ship’s timbers are slowly drying out in giant steel tanks at the Danish national museum’s conservation centre at Brede outside Copenhagen, and will soon again head across the North Sea – to be a star attraction at an exhibition in the British Museum.

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Hanging Mankato's History

There is a memorial service down the street in honor of the 38 Dakotans executed during the Dakotan Conflict as I sit here at a bagel shop in downtown Mankato. There are a good number of people in attendance and police are directing traffic. You can read about it here.

 

The largest mass execution in United States’ history happened here. It’s been 150 years and there is going to be a new monument. It’s a 20 foot scroll with 38 names located across the street from the execution. A public library and a few statues sit on the actual execution site while a bridge leaves the site in its shadow.

 

The monument is an island, and it’s practically located under a bridge. It’s not exactly hidden, but it certainly doesn’t have a prominent location or good civic location.

David Connolly's insight:

Good piece on how you relate to the violence and executions of history

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Digging into 2012's archaeology

Digging into 2012's archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
University of Cambridge visiting scholar Louise Iles runs through the archaeological finds of 2012.

As much as science looked to the future this year in fields ranging from particle physics to planetary exploration, 2012 also gave us a rich view into the past. Here's a month-by-month view of what excited archaeologists through the year.

David Connolly's insight:

Interesting choice.   

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Archaeologists Find Ancient Temple, Ritual Cache Near Jerusalem

Archaeologists Find Ancient Temple, Ritual Cache Near Jerusalem | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An ancient temple and cache of sacred vessels uncovered by Israeli archaeologists provides rare evidence of rituals held outside Jerusalem about 2,700 years ago, Israel Antiquities Authority said.
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Celebrating the Mysterious Ancient Cult of Mithras in Rome | PRI's The World

Celebrating the Mysterious Ancient Cult of Mithras in Rome | PRI's The World | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Rome have just re-opened a restored underground temple dating back to ancient Rome, dedicated to the cult of a deity named Mithras.
David Connolly's insight:

What centuries-old religion celebrates the birth of its spiritual leader on December 25th?

 

Here’s another hint: it has rituals that include baptism and breaking of the bread.

 

Yes, it’s Christianity. But this also describes Mithraism — a mysterious Ancient Roman cult that predated Christianity.

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Rail dig unearths London secrets

Rail dig unearths London secrets | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists working on one of the UK's largest projects - probing beneath the streets of central London - reveal their most exciting finds.
David Connolly's insight:

Superb finds...   make sure the post excvation budget is there!

 

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Archaeo Christmas News Podcast 221 : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeo Christmas News Podcast 221 : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Stone Pages with BAJR and Past Horizons presents the long running archaeology based podcast with the latest archaeology news, mainly related to prehistory, megalithic monuments and discoveries.
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World's Oldest Wooden Water Wells Discovered

World's Oldest Wooden Water Wells Discovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Researchers have discovered four wooden water wells in the Greater Leipzig region in Germany, which are believed to be the oldest known timber constructions in the world.
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Give Santa back! Turkish professor calls for return of St Nicholas' bones which were taken to the Vatican in the 11th century

Give Santa back! Turkish professor calls for return of St Nicholas' bones which were taken to the Vatican in the 11th century | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Professor Nvzat Cevik said the bones of the third century saint were taken out of the country in 1087 'by force' and buried in Italy.
David Connolly's insight:

Hmmmm...  that's going to happen?  

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Fortress in the Sky: Buried Christian Empire Casts New Light on Early Islam

Fortress in the Sky: Buried Christian Empire Casts New Light on Early Islam | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archeologists are studying the ruins of a buried Christian empire in the highlands of Yemen. The sites have sparked a number of questions about the early history of Islam. Was there once a church in Mecca?

 

A  work of human self-portrayal has turned up in Yemen. It is a figure, chiseled in stone, which apparently stems from the era of the Prophet.

 

Paul Yule, an archeologist from the southwestern German city of Heidelberg, has studied the relief, which is 1.70 meters (5'7") tall, in Zafar, some 930 kilometers (581 miles) south of Mecca. It depicts a man with chains of jewelry, curls and spherical eyes. Yule dates the image to the time around 530 AD.

 

In 525 AD, the Negus, or king, of Aksum dispatched a fleet across the Red Sea. Soldiers and fighting elephants were ferried across the water to the East on un-tarred, raft-like ships to spread the gospel. In the ensuing decades, his army captured large parts of Arabia.

 

Could this be a fragment of the kingdom?

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