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Teotihuacans used cosmetics as part of after-death ritual : Past Horizons Archaeology

Teotihuacans used cosmetics as part of after-death ritual : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In collaboration with the National University of Mexico, a team of Spanish researchers has analysed for the first time remains of cosmetics in the graves of prehispanic civilisations on the American continent. In the case of the Teotihuacans, these cosmetics were used as part of the after-death ritual to honour their city’s most important people.

A research team from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and the University of Valencia has studied various funerary samples found in urns in the Teotihuacan archaeological site (Mexico) that date from between 200 and 500 AD.

The scientists have been researching Mayan wall paintings in Mexico and Guatemala since 2006. Published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, this project came about after contact on various occasions with other researchers in the area, namely the National University of Mexico, who wanted to know the composition and function of the cosmetics found in pots.

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RESCUE DOG BECOMES FIRST ARCHEOLOGY DOG

RESCUE DOG BECOMES FIRST ARCHEOLOGY DOG | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Migaloo is a rescue dog with a special talent. Her owner, Australian dog owner Gary Jackson, trained this black lab-Mastiff mix to become the first “Archeology Dog”, able to sniff out bones that are hundreds of years old.
David Connolly's insight:

No really!

But we ain't selling this at Past Horizons! 

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Ancient pill ingredients probed

Ancient pill ingredients probed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Medicine that is more than 2,000 years old has been analysed by scientists.

Six tablets were discovered in a tin box onboard an ancient Roman shipwreck, found off the coast of Italy.

Samples of the fragile material revealed that the pharmaceuticals contained animal and plant fats, pine resin and zinc compounds.

Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers said the medicine might have been used to treat eye infections.

"I am surprised by the fact we have found so many ingredients and they were very well preserved considering it was under water for so much time," said Maria Perla Colombini, professor of chemistry from the University of Pisa.

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Roman kids showed off status with shoes

Roman kids showed off status with shoes | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Even on the farthest-flung frontiers of the ancient Roman Empire, the footwear made the man ­— and the kid.  Children and infants living in and around Roman military bases around the first century wore shoes that revealed the kids' social status,...
David Connolly's insight:

No change !

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Keeping our digital cultural heritage alive : Past Horizons Archaeology

Keeping our digital cultural heritage alive : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Remember those early days of computer games and consoles? Keeping digital ‘treasures’ like Super Mario and Pacman for posterity is a huge technical challenge. And the same issues apply to the high-end business software of yesteryear. But thanks to an EU-funded project, we now have tools that will enable access to obsolete software long into the future.

Thanks to the systematic activities of libraries, museums and national archives, much of our digital heritage is well preserved. Many copies of legacy software, from early video games to high-end professional software suites, have been collected as artefacts of the digital age.

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Trespassers 'scar' 2400 BC mound

Trespassers 'scar' 2400 BC mound | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Trespassers on a rain-soaked monument in Wiltshire are causing "spectacular" damage, an archaeologist has warned.

Heavy rain has led to standing water around Silbury Hill in Avebury and very soft ground which is being eroded by people climbing the monument.

Jim Leary, an archaeologist for English Heritage, said that illegal climbers on the sodden hill were "leaving some really rather hideous scars".

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Najaf’s historic building gets a new lease on life | ArabNews

Najaf’s historic building gets a new lease on life | ArabNews | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

IT served as an Ottoman headquarters, a prison, an ice factory and a mill before falling into neglect. Now Najaf's historic and much loved Khan Al-Shilan is getting a new lease of life — as a museum.


Local authorities in Najaf plan to turn the structure into a museum featuring antiquities and archaeological pieces, as well as statues of rebels and some of the actual weapons they used in a 1920 Iraqi uprising against the British, during which captured soldiers were held at Khan Al-Shilan.


In addition to its long history, Khan Al-Shilan is significant due to the remains of drawings and dates left by the captive British soldiers, which are still visible on its walls.

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Gaza's archaeological treasures at risk from neglect and war

Gaza's archaeological treasures at risk from neglect and war | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
While traces of Gaza's historical past remain, the race to preserve what is left beneath the surface of this battle-scarred land is fraught with problems, as Ruqaya Izzidien reports.

 

Years of conflict have exacted a heavy toll on centuries of history in the Gaza Strip. While traces of its rich past remain, the race to preserve what is left beneath the surface of this battle-scarred land is fraught with problems, as Ruqaya Izzidien reports.

 

Settled by civilisations spanning some five millennia, Gaza has been built layer-upon-layer since the Bronze Age.

 

As each era ended, its people left behind remnants of their times - churches, monasteries, palaces and mosques, as well as thousands of precious artefacts.

David Connolly's insight:

As ever the past shows the merged blurred boundaries of humans, and it also shows that conflict is in the end futile.   Time cares nothing for causes.   A shared past should represent a shared present.

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US treasure hunters ready to snatch gold from the jaws of Victory - Telegraph

US treasure hunters ready to snatch gold from the jaws of Victory - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
US treasure hunters should be banned from raising the wreck of one of Britain’s greatest warships and taking some of the millions of pounds of gold coins she is believed to contain, leading archaeologists and descendants of the crew demand...
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Blue plaques go to the wall: Government cuts spell the end to tributes on former homes of the great and the good after 140 years

Blue plaques go to the wall: Government cuts spell the end to tributes on former homes of the great and the good after 140 years | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The taxpayer-funded quango English Heritage says it will honour existing commitments but can't accept new nominations because it can no longer affords to pay for them. (Agreed. MT “@PD_Smith: Pity...
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Maya 'fat god' platter found in ruins

Maya 'fat god' platter found in ruins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Here's one more reason to be glad those 2012 Maya doomsday worries didn't pan out - Maya scholarship, thankfully, just kept on going.

 

An international archaeology team, for example, reports that a well-known Maya ruin site had its origins further back in time than anyone first supposed. Nestled in the hilly interior of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, the ruin of Kiuic turns out to boast a pyramid of surprising antiquity, dating back to 700 B.C., as shown by carbon dating. Long seen as a transitional corridor between the ancient Maya cities of Central America and the later ones of the Yucatan coast, the hilly "Puuc" region that is home to Kiuic and other sites, instead, looks like a longtime home of the vanished culture.

David Connolly's insight:

The three feet of the platter depicted the Maya "fat god," a patron of feasting, appropriately enough ...  how good is that!

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Skeptical Outreach about Ancient Aliens

Skeptical Outreach about Ancient Aliens | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The success of Ancient Aliens and other pseudo-archaeology documentaries has largely gone unopposed by organized skeptics. Skeptics need to reach beyond academia to provide information to a broader audiences.
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Bulgarian Archeologists Unearth Gods Poseidon, Priapus Temples

Bulgarian Archeologists Unearth Gods Poseidon, Priapus Temples | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Bulgarian archeologists in the historical coastal town of Sozopol are working on unearthing two antique temples - of Gods Poseidon and Priapus.

 

The information was announced over the weekend by the Director of the National History Museum and former Minister for Bulgarians abroad, Bozhidar Dimitrov. He added that archaeological excavations were ongoing near the fortress wall where the entrance to the town was uncovered in the summer with well-preserved parts of two towers and the "Saint Nikolay" monastery.

David Connolly's insight:

Bulgaria is one of the up coming places for archaeology and new knowledge! 

keep at it! 

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The Predatory Nature of Settler Colonialism Set in Stone

The Predatory Nature of Settler Colonialism Set in Stone | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
As I consider the settler history of the state of Colorado, I am frustrated with the continued glorification of early settlers and perpetuation of the grand narrative in dominant literature, especially in reference to the Sand Creek Massacre.
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Byzantine Chapel found beneath Turkish river mud

Byzantine Chapel found beneath Turkish river mud | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The excellent condition of a newly discovered 13th-century chapel has stirred hopes among archaeologists that an entire city may be largely intact underground.

 

After some 800 years as an important pilgrimage site in the Byzantine Empire it vanished — buried under 18 feet of mud from the rampaging Myros River.

 

But now, 700 years later, Myra is reappearing.

 

Archaeologists first detected the ancient city in 2009 using ground-penetrating radar that revealed anomalies whose shape and size suggested walls and buildings. Over the next two years they excavated a small, stunning 13th-century chapel sealed in an uncanny state of preservation. Carved out of one wall is a cross that, when sunlit, beams its shape onto the altar.

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Find of Roman statues 'important'

Find of Roman statues 'important' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Italy say they have discovered what they've called a "very important" series of statues dating back to the Roman era, linked to the celebrated poet Ovid.

 

The seven figures were found in a villa outside the city owned by the patron of the celebrated poet, Ovid.

They depict one of the myths recounted in his masterpiece, Metamorphoses, that of the proud mother Niobe.

The team unearthed the 2m-high figures at the bottom of what would have been a richly-decorated swimming pool.

 

David Connolly's insight:

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

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Louise Zarmati's curator insight, January 8, 2013 7:04 PM

My fave poet...  ( Roman one that is )

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Two arrested in Fayoum for possession of artifacts

Two arrested in Fayoum for possession of artifacts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Two suspects were arrested for the illegal possession of 50 ancient Egyptian artefacts in Fayoum on Thursday.
David Connolly's insight:

This is what you need to see...   robbers being arrested...  the next part is not to loot in the first place!

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.:Middle East Online::Ancient gold coins discovered in Iraq:.

.:Middle East Online::Ancient gold coins discovered in Iraq:. | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

raqi archaeologists have found 66 gold coins that are at least 1,400 years old, officials said on Monday, adding that they hope to put them on display in Baghdad's National Museum.

The artefacts, which date back to the Sassanid era that extended from 225 BC to 640 AD, will be sent for laboratory tests in order to confirm their authenticity.

They were discovered in the town of Aziziyah, which lies 70 kilometres (40 miles) southeast of Baghdad in Wasit province, according to Hassanian Mohammed Ali, director of the provincial antiquities department.

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New dates refine Australian timeline : Past Horizons Archaeology

New dates refine Australian timeline : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Nyiyaparli Traditional Owners from the Pilbara region of Western Australia recently announced the dates for the oldest occupation ever found in the area.

Oldest known occupation in the Pilbara

The Nyiyaparli Heritage Sub-Committee and Karlka Nyiyaparli Aboriginal Corporation working with archaeologists from the heritage company Archae-aus evaluated a rock shelter in the area as part of a larger survey.  The samples of charcoal retrieved along with artefacts were analysed using carbon-dating techniques and returned a date that amazed the  archaeologists – the layer of occupation was 41,230 calendar years old (ka).

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Deep Time at Tall Hisban

Tall Hisban is an archaeological ruin between Madaba and Amman, Jordan. While the complete story of its history and how it interacts with the present day des...
David Connolly's insight:

spellbinding way to envisage an archaeological site.

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Louise Zarmati's comment, January 7, 2013 4:57 PM
David, you find the best stuff! Thanks for trawling the web so diligently.
David Connolly's comment, January 7, 2013 5:07 PM
Thank you very much. I love spending a peaceful breakfast learning about what is new for the day!
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18th-century 'Aristotle' sex manual to be auctioned next week - Telegraph

18th-century 'Aristotle' sex manual to be auctioned next week - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A once-banned book on sex and pregnancy from the 18th century is expected to fetch up to £400 when it goes on sale in Edinburgh next week.

 

Aristotle’s Complete Master-Piece is a manual which is thought to have provided information for amateur midwives and young married couples about pregnancy and sex. It is up sale at Edinburgh auction house, Lyon & Turnbull on 9 January, where it is expected to reach up to £400.

 

Despite its title, the manual has little to do with Greek philosophy according to Lyon & Turnbull’s book specialist Cathy Marsden.

 

Instead, the anonymous author of the Master-Piece offers dubious 17th century advice - it was first published in 1684, cobbled together from the works of Nicholas Culpepper, Albertus Magnus and, Marsden says, “a good dose of old wife’s tale”.

David Connolly's insight:

dubious 17th century adviceon sex...  what could possibly go wrong??

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The Little-Known Legend of Jesus in Japan | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine

The Little-Known Legend of Jesus in Japan | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A mountain hamlet in northern Japan claims Jesus Christ was buried there (So does every community anywhere in the world - have a Jesus of sort.
David Connolly's insight:

No really!!

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Breeding newts scupper top shops

Breeding newts scupper top shops | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Building work on a major shopping development in York is delayed due to the newt population growing from nine to 300 at the site.
David Connolly's insight:

"The two males and seven females, which have been found both this year and in previous surveys of newts at the Monks Cross site, have been using trenches dug as part of an archaeological dig in 2005 for breeding.

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Famed Roman shipwreck reveals more secrets

Famed Roman shipwreck reveals more secrets | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A Roman plunder ship that wrecked off the Greek coast, preserving a storied astronomical clock, looks twice as large as marine archaeologist have believed for a century.

 

Ancient artifacts resembling the Antikythera mechanism, an ancient bronze clockwork astronomical calculator, may rest amid the larger-than-expected Roman shipwreck that yielded the device in 1901.
David Connolly's insight:

An international survey team says the ship is twice as long as originally thought and contains many more calcified objects amid the ship's lost cargo that hint at new discoveries.

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Treasure to be saved for the nation

Treasure to be saved for the nation | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

MOST of a collection of items recently found close to where the famous Staffordshire Hoard was discovered have been declared treasure trove.

 

The most interesting included an eagle mount and a helmet cheek piece. Dr Leahy said the finds had “roused the public’s interest” in a period which had until recently been “the Dark Ages”.

 

He added: “This is a period which runs for twice that of the Romans, and which shows Anglo-Saxons were highly cultured.”

 

Some gold from the Staffordshire Hoard could be traced to Istanbul in Turkey, the gems to India and Eastern Europe, showing Anglo-Saxons to be accomplished traders.

David Connolly's insight:

Though what disturbs me is the 10 items that were not classed as treasure.   which I hope will stay with the hoard.  

in Scotland - everything is classed as Treasure.   or bona vacentia - to be correct. 

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