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HIV shows ancient origin : Past Horizons Archaeology

HIV shows ancient origin : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Naturally circulating lentiviruses are abundant in African primate species today, yet their origins and history of transmitting between hosts remain obscure.  perhaps not any more!

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Egyptian Mummy's Hairstyle Makes a Comeback

Egyptian Mummy's Hairstyle Makes a Comeback | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

CT scans of the mummy of a young woman in McGill University’s Redpath Museum have allowed researchers to recreate a hairstyle that was popular in Roman-ruled Egypt, nearly 2,000 years ago. “The mummy's hair is readily appreciable,” wrote the team in a recently published paper, “with longer strands at the middle of the scalp drawn back into twists or plaits that were then wound into a tutulus, or chignon at the vertex (crown) of the head.” The researchers also studied two other Egyptian mummies from the museum, one of an older woman who lived at the same time as the well-coiffed mummy, and the other of a young man who lived a few centuries earlier. Both had severe dental problems.

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Roman Marker Used to Measure Earth Found : DNews

Italian researchers have unearthed a marble benchmark which was once used to measure the shape of Earth in the 19th century.

 

Called Benchmark B, the marker was found near the town of Frattocchie along one of the earliest Roman roads which links the Eternal City to the southern city of Brindisi.

 

Placed there by Father Angelo Secchi (1818-1878), a pioneer of astrophysics, the marker consisted of a small travertine slab with a metallic plate in the middle. The plate featured a hole at its center.

 

“The hole was the terminal point of the geodetic baseline which run in the ancient Appian Way near Rome, between the tomb of Cecilia Metella, a daughter of a Roman consul, and a tower near Frattocchie,” Tullio Aebischer, a cartographical consultant at the department of mathematics and physics of Roma Tre University, told Discovery News.

David Connolly's insight:

19th century scientists once measured Earth based on triangulated measurements and now archaeologists have uncovered one of their key markers the fabulously named.   Marker B

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Sifting Evidence with British Columbia's Ancient Civilization Sleuths - ICTMN.com

Sifting Evidence with British Columbia's Ancient Civilization Sleuths - ICTMN.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeology on British Columbia's coast is never dull. In this instance, the group is following Duncan McLaren, a University of Victoria (UVic) archaeologist preoccupied with the past of this remote and soggy place, costly to reach and formidable to researchers used to milder landscapes. But it's also a rich place, where the buried past presses close to the surface, evidence of a people's home since the end of the last glacial period over 11,000 calendar years ago.

The discipline of archaeology has traditionally viewed the islands and fjords of the Central Coast as a corridor to somewhere else, imagining it as the route out of Asia to the Americas, speeding travelers on their way to what would become California, Texas, and southern Chile—a faceless service area on the turnpike heading south.

 

McLaren belongs to a group of scientists with a different perspective. Their question is not the familiar "Where did people come from and where did they go?" Rather, it's, "How did the people live here so well?"

David Connolly's insight:

Brilliant longer article that looks at an often overlooked archaeology

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A fragile Buddhist treasure : Past Horizons Archaeology

A fragile Buddhist treasure : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Experts at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) are in the process of analysing Indian Buddhist texts that are over 2000-year-old which have recently come to light. The precious manuscripts have already yielded some surprising results.

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Ancient Chinese arrowhead unearthed in Japan first of its kind found

Ancient Chinese arrowhead unearthed in Japan first of its kind found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists say an ancient Chinese arrowhead unearthed in Okayama City in Western Japan is the first of its kind discovered in the country.

The bronze arrowhead has been dated to the Warring States period of ancient Chinese history, 475 B.C. to 221 B.C., China's state-run Xinhua news agency reported Thursday.

Researchers said the Chinese artifact, a "double-winged bronze arrowhead," was unearthed at the Minamigata ruins located in the city center of Okayama.

 
David Connolly's insight:

The question is what it was used for in Japan/

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Sapphire ring's mystery history

Sapphire ring's mystery history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A sapphire ring found in North Yorkshire sparks a meeting of experts to determine exactly when it was made.
David Connolly's insight:

Natalie McCaul, from the museum, said the meeting may "shed new light on the ring" and "reveal some of its secrets".

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Entombing the Tomb of the Gladiator: Who Will Save the Roman Ruins?

Entombing the Tomb of the Gladiator: Who Will Save the Roman Ruins? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When archaeologists announced the discovery of the tomb of Marcus Nonius Macrinus in Rome in 2008, the find was heralded as the most important in decades. Built in the shape of a temple, with tall fluted columns and an intricately carved sarcophagus, it was the final resting place for the Roman general who served as inspiration for Russell Crowe‘s character in the movie Gladiator, unearthed a the site of a planned housing project some 1,800 years after its construction.

 

 

David Connolly's insight:

Italy is running out of money to preserve the remains of the Roman Empire

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The Women Who Fought in the Civil War

The Women Who Fought in the Civil War | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Even though women weren’t legally allowed to fight in the Civil War, it is estimated that somewhere around 400 women disguised themselves as men and went to war, sometimes without anyone ever discovering their true identities.

Bonnie Tsui is the author of She Went to the Field: Women Soldiers in the Civil War, which tells the stories of some of these women. I spoke with the San Francisco-based writer about her research into the seldom-acknowledged participation of women in the Civil War.

 

David Connolly's insight:
 

Hundreds of women concealed their identities so they could battle alongside their Union and Confederate counterparts

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janetpbj's curator insight, February 16, 2013 6:06 PM

Not related to quilts, but interesting

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Neanderthal cloning chatter highlights scientific illiteracy

Neanderthal cloning chatter highlights scientific illiteracy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

After spending the weekend reading blog posts claiming that he was seeking an "extremely adventurous female human" to bear a cloned Neanderthal baby - which was news to him - Harvard geneticist George Church said it may be time for society to give some thought to scientific literacy.

 

Church became the subject of dozens of posts and tabloid newspaper articles calling him a "mad scientist" after giving an interview to the German magazine Der Spiegel.

 

In the interview, Church discussed the technical challenges scientists would face if they tried to clone a Neanderthal, though neither he nor the Der Spiegel article, which was presented as a question and answer exchange, said he intended to do so.

 

"Harvard professor seeks mother for cloned cave baby," read one headline, on the website of London's Daily Mail.

 

But Church explained on Wednesday that he was simply theorizing.

David Connolly's insight:

That's what happens!

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Medici Warrior Died of Gangrene - Archaeology Magazine

Medici Warrior Died of Gangrene - Archaeology Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

esting of Giovanni de’ Medici’s bones has shown that the mercenary soldier died of gangrene, and not an improperly amputated leg, as had been rumored. Known as Giovanni of the Black Bands for the black bands of mourning he wore after the death of Pope Leo X, he was hit be a cannon ball during a battle when he was 28 years old. “The leg was already partially amputated by the cannon ball, so the surgeon simply completed the amputation by cleaning the wound and smoothing the stump,” said Gino Fornaciari of the University of Pisa.

David Connolly's insight:

That is a sign of the times he lived in.   but it does surprise me, that he did not get better treatment.

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Earliest Evidence of Chocolate in North America - ScienceNOW

Earliest Evidence of Chocolate in North America - ScienceNOW | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

They were humble farmers who grew corn and dwelt in subterranean pit houses. But the people who lived 1200 years ago in a Utah village known as Site 13, near Canyonlands National Park in Utah, seem to have had at least one indulgence: chocolate.

 

Researchers report that half a dozen bowls excavated from the area contain traces of chocolate, the earliest known in North America. The finding implies that by the end of the 8th century C.E., cacao beans, which grow only in the tropics, were being imported to Utah from orchards thousands of kilometers away.

David Connolly's insight:

mmmmm  choclate!

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Jesus, Take the Wheel: Texas Education Is a Mess of Biblical Proportions

Jesus, Take the Wheel: Texas Education Is a Mess of Biblical Proportions | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In the Permian High School class Bible History and Literature, public school students are taught that the Bible's miracle stories – in this specific case, Moses crossing the Red Sea – have been proven through archaeology. This course is among a host of examples of academically problematic lessons taught to secondary students in 57 public school districts and three charter school districts in Texas.
David Connolly's insight:

oh oh!!!!

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World's oldest portrait reveals the ice-age mind

World's oldest portrait reveals the ice-age mind | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Twenty-six thousand years ago in the Czech Republic, one of our ice-age ancestors selected a hunk of mammoth ivory and carved this enigmatic portrait of a woman - the oldest ever found. By looking at artefacts like this as works of art, rather than archaeological finds, a new exhibition at the British Museum in London hopes to help us see them and their creators with new eyes.

David Connolly's insight:

lovely to see this beautiful face from our part.  What story can it tell?

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Loom weights reveal existence of weaving since 2,500 years ago

ARCHAEOLOGY - Loom weights reveal existence of weaving since 2,500 years ago | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Loom weights dating back 2,500 years that were found in the ancient Assoss show the textile industry has existed in the region since ancient times
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Entombing the Tomb of the Gladiator: Who Will Save the Roman Ruins?

Entombing the Tomb of the Gladiator: Who Will Save the Roman Ruins? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When archaeologists announced the discovery of the tomb of Marcus Nonius Macrinus in Rome in 2008, the find was heralded as the most important in decades. Built in the shape of a temple, with tall fluted columns and an intricately carved sarcophagus, it was the final resting place for the Roman general who served as inspiration for Russell Crowe‘s character in the movie Gladiator, unearthed a the site of a planned housing project some 1,800 years after its construction.

 
David Connolly's insight:

Italy is running out of money to preserve the remains of the Roman Empire

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Spectacular Ancient Ruins You've Never Heard Of - Starry-Eyed Travels

Spectacular Ancient Ruins You've Never Heard Of - Starry-Eyed Travels | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

I am a self-confessed history geek, so it is not surprising that many of my travels feature ancient sites quite heavily. I have a bit of a vivid imagination, so it doesn’t take much for a place steeped in history to come alive to me, particularly if it is a half-forgotten place, overshadowed by far more famous neighbours. So come with me to the highlands of Peru, the deserts of Argentina, the South of France - and my hometown. Are you ready to travel through time?

David Connolly's insight:

Get travelling!

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War a money-spinner in Late Middle Ages : Past Horizons Archaeology

War a money-spinner in Late Middle Ages : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Research by a University of Southampton historian has found that the practice of ransom was widespread among all soldiers during the Hundred Years War (1337 – 1453) and not, as generally thought, just the preserve of kings, knights and higher orders.

Dr Rémy Ambühl has found that ransom in war provided a valuable source of income for all classes in the Late Middle Ages, including those in the lower orders. He says: “There is widespread evidence to suggest that during the 15th century the practice of ransom is increasingly extended to commoners, not just Kings or chivalrous Knights.”

David Connolly's insight:

Very interesting look at the free market being taken over by the govt!     Better to be worth something alive than dead!

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Alice In Wonderland Mural Discovered On SDSU Campus | KPBS.org

Alice In Wonderland Mural Discovered On SDSU Campus | KPBS.org | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archeologists often have to be great detectives. A professor at San Diego State has used his detective skills to find hidden historic murals on the university’s campus.

 

Seth Mallios spends a lot of time in Hardy Tower, searching for clues.

 

He’s looking for murals that used to cover the walls and ceilings throughout the building, which used to be home to the university library and art department. Many of the murals date back to the 1930s and 40s. Over the years, they’ve been painted over or lost to new construction.

 

Mallios, an archeologist and head of the anthropology department at SDSU, says he's been all over the campus. "I’ve crawled into every ceiling, under every building, I have found a couple of other murals. I’ve found sketches of murals."

David Connolly's insight:

Amazing

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Ice age art at the British Museum was crafted by ‘professional’ artists : Past Horizons Archaeology

Ice age art at the British Museum was crafted by ‘professional’ artists : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

It’s smaller than your thumb: a little piece of mammoth ivory delicately carved into the shape of a woman’s head. But this miniature sculpture, with one wonky eye and rather elongated, slightly Modigliani-esque proportions, is the oldest known portrait in the world, and is about to go on show to the public for the first time in Britain in a new exhibition at the British Museum, Ice Age Art: Arrival of the Modern Mind.

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Ice Age art: arrival of the modern mind

Ice Age art: arrival of the modern mind | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Information about the British Museum exhibition Ice Age art arrival of the modern mind

 

Discover masterpieces from the last Ice Age drawn from across Europe in this groundbreaking show. Created between 40,000 and 10,000 years ago by artists with modern minds like our own, this is a unique opportunity to see the world's oldest known sculptures, drawings and portraits.

David Connolly's insight:

Stunning

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The Solar Map Project – recording the Ita letra : Past Horizons Archaeology

The Solar Map Project – recording the Ita letra : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Enigmatic petroglyphs, once hidden deep within the Paraguayan jungle are a testament to the people of the Amambay hills. However, as the jungle is increasingly torn down and the trees set alight by slash and burn farmers, the rock-art is disappearing at an alarming rate.

David Connolly's insight:

And you can help finance this project.  

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Archaeologists unearth Bulgarian treasure trove

Archeologists in Bulgaria have unearthed a treasure dating back to the third century BC. Gold rings, figurines, bracelets and buttons have been dug up after ...
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A battlefield from the War of 1812 is 'frozen in time'

A battlefield from the War of 1812 is 'frozen in time' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The DNA of a battle that helped turn the tide of a war going horribly wrong for America lay buried just 6 inches below a Maryland cornfield.

 

For nearly two centuries, musket balls, canister shot and other artifacts from intense fighting at Caulk's Field waited to tell the story of a sweltering August night in 1814, when militiamen sprang a trap on a British raiding party bent on destruction.

 

How did the citizen-soldiers best their battle-tested foes?

 

State archaeologist Julie Schablitsky hopes to figure that out. With the help of cadaver-sniffing dogs and history buffs armed with metal detectors, she is retracing the footsteps of Sir Peter Parker, a British marine captain who led 170 troops, and a like number of militiamen commanded by Col. Philip Reed.

David Connolly's insight:

A great example of how collaborative carefully coordinated work can piece together a moment in time

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Archaeologists revise image of ancient Celts

Archaeologists revise image of ancient Celts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Celts were long considered a barbaric and violent society. But new findings from a 2,600-year-old grave in Germany suggest the ancient people were much more sophisticated than previously thought.

 

The little Bettelbühl stream on the Danube River was completely unknown, except to local residents. But that changed in the summer of 2010 when a spectacular discovery was made just next to the creek.

 

Not far from the Heuneburg, the site of an early Celtic settlement, researchers stumbled upon the elaborate grave of a Celtic princess. In addition to gold and amber, they found a subterranean burial chamber fitted with massive oak beams. It was an archeological sensation that, after 2,600 years, the chamber was completely intact.

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Gwen McCauley's curator insight, May 13, 2015 9:25 AM

Many tales to be told with this find . . .