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4,000 year old shaman’s stones discovered : Past Horizons Archaeology

4,000 year old shaman’s stones discovered : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama have discovered a cluster of 12 unusual stones in the back of a small, prehistoric rock-shelter near the town of Boquete. The cache represents the earliest material evidence of shamanistic practice in lower Central America.

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Violence in Neolithic Denmark and Sweden

Violence in Neolithic Denmark and Sweden | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Understanding trends of violence in the past is important for interpretations of the character of past cultures, origins of warfare and relationships between (or within) groups. By looking at the total deceased population of a site during the same time period we can see patterns of violence associated with specific age, sex or social groups. Only recently have studies begun to reexamine evidence from the Neolithic for violence- since it was previously thought it was a relatively peaceful period. It is posited that the changes in the Neolithic, introduction of farming, decreased mobility and rise of animal husbandry, may have lead to changes in interpersonal behavior. However, evidence for violence is low and often can be interpreted in multiple ways.

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Rare Artifact Stolen From Israeli Archaeological Dig | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com

Rare Artifact Stolen From Israeli Archaeological Dig | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A recently uncovered rare archaeological artifact was stolen this week from the Tel Shiloh archaeological site in Israel.

 

Tazpit News Agency reported last week on the discovery of the artifact, a broken clay pitcher lying in a layer of reddish ashes that helped to complete the story of the devastation of Shiloh, the ancient capital of Israel during the First Israelite commonwealth. The ashes found attest to a devastating fire the occurred on the site. The dating of the clay pitcher, 1050 BCE, correlates with the dating of the limited portrayal of events surrounding Shiloh’s destruction depicted in Book of Samuel.

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Is construction work a boon for urban archaeologists?

Is construction work a boon for urban archaeologists? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Dr. Linda Rudy of Chicago’s Old Town neighborhood wondered if urban archaeologists ever looked at construction sites to see if anything interesting was down there. A great question, but it gets more intriguing when you consider Linda’s backstory.

“They’re digging up Wells Street to put in new water mains and there are really big trenches right in the street,” she said. “I saw railroad ties being hauled out. I wonder what railroad ties were doing under Wells Street.”

David Connolly's insight:

Strange that there is not now a requirement for this.   perhaps i am being Eurocentric

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Costa News - Roman secrets

Costa News - Roman secrets | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
THE EXCAVATION work on the Projecto Villajoyosa Romana, which has been ongoing for the past few weeks, has uncovered the remains of two houses built in the 16th and 18th centuries.

The foundations of the two structures cover a 100-square metre area to the north of the tower.

Under the direction of Diego Ruiz of the Villajoyosa museum and archaeologists Lorenzo Abad and Sonia Gutiérrez of Alicante University, excavation of the area around the Sant Josep tower has uncovered more evidence of how the site was used.

David Connolly's insight:

A little known section of antiquity comes to life.

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The deforestion of Central Africa: Man or climate? : Past Horizons Archaeology

The deforestion of Central Africa: Man or climate? : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Seems that we are  (as humans) off the hook for this particular environmental change.  

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Mesolithic people adapted their environment in Severn Estuary : Past Horizons Archaeology

Mesolithic people adapted their environment in Severn Estuary : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
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HotSpotHistory's curator insight, January 21, 2013 5:53 PM

Eine sehr interessante Ausführung...

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You Wouldn't Want To Be A Roman Gladiator!

Will you live or die after your first fight as a Roman gladiator? Find out what fate awaits you on your journey to the arena

David Connolly's insight:

One of the excellent Web Book from Salariya.  

Use it yourself...  or for school...   excellent

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A History Lesson from Genes: Using DNA to Tell Us How Populations Change

When Charles Darwin first sketched how species evolved by natural selection, he drew what looked like a tree. The diagram started at a central point with a common ancestor, then the lines spread apart as organisms evolved and separated into distinct species.

In the 175 years since, scientists have come to agree that Darwin’s original drawing is a bit simplistic, given that multiple species mix and interbreed in ways he didn’t consider possible (though you can’t fault the guy for not getting the most important scientific theory of all time exactly right the first time). Using a tree-like structure is a great way to show the history of the evolution of a species, or its phylogeny. But it’s not so great for showing the population history of groups within a single species, such as humans, who can move around and interbreed with each other.

David Connolly's insight:

If you try to make a tree of population histories within a species, there’s always the possibility that you’ve got genes flowing from one branch to another,

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In India's Ancient Khajuraho, Eroticism Mingles With International Commerce

In India's Ancient Khajuraho, Eroticism Mingles With International Commerce | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When you pass the sign that says “Welcome to Khajuraho,” you enter a different land. The roads become broad and smooth. Lush lawns and tall green trees line up on both sides of the street.

And, most strikingly, sex and eroticism are no longer taboo. Khajuraho – which is at the heart of Madhya Pradesh, a state called the “Heart of India” — is famous for its 1,000-year-old temples full of highly detailed erotic art and stone carvings, which draw millions of visitors each year.

David Connolly's insight:

The most magnificent temple in this complex is the Lakshmana Temple

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Abandoned Colony in Greenland: Archaeologists Find Clues to Viking Mystery - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Abandoned Colony in Greenland: Archaeologists Find Clues to Viking Mystery - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

For years, researchers have puzzled over why Viking descendents abandoned Greenland in the late 15th century. But archaeologists now believe that economic and identity issues, rather than starvation and disease, drove them back to their ancestral homes.

On Sept. 14, 1408, Thorstein Olafsson and Sigrid Björnsdottir were married. The ceremony took place in a church on Hvalsey Fjord in Greenland that was only five meters (about 16 feet) tall.

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British Archaeological Jobs and Resources

British Archaeological Jobs and Resources | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
UK Archaeology Site with latest jobs, news and resources, forum and library, also with help for developers in Britain hosted by the British Archaeological Jobs Resource BAJR
David Connolly's insight:

The one and only!  

BAJR...   the UK's trusted archaeology job site

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Dig discovers 9,000-year-old remains at Didcot

Dig discovers 9,000-year-old remains at Didcot | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have proved for the first time that people started living in the Didcot area as early as 9,000 years ago.

 

Oxford Archaeology has been excavating land at Great Western Park, where more than 3,300 homes are being built, to detail the site’s history.

The two-and-a-half-year dig has uncovered the remains of a Roman villa, and early Bronze Age arrowheads which will now go on display.

Rob Masefield – director of archaeology at RPS Planning, which is managing the investigation – said one of the most important discoveries was hundreds of flints dating back over 9,000 years to the Mesolithic period.

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Maya Mysteriums

To experience another culture is to grasp the truth of a metaphor. To seek something out is to dig, and so I did. I crossed pathways with LSU archaeologist, Dr. Heather Mckillop, when I learned of her research on the Classic Maya civilization. Through this process, I realized that there is a certain subjective nature to the scientific study of archaeology. However, it was her personal stories from journeys abroad, and the stories from other Mesoamerican archaeologists, which captured my enthusiasm for this project. I collected footage online, and remixed it into an archival exploration of Maya culture, from both past and present times.


I sense that the future holds something beautiful in the balance of art and science collaborations. I believe that even though Dr. Heather and I possess different ideas, we will always share the same ideal. We both desire to protect and preserve ancient cultures and their withstanding mysteries that continue to baffle researchers. The society we currently live in today is not the result of a natural process, but is the result of outside invasions and the aftermaths of those efforts. It is time for horizon lines separating us from each other to diminish, and for each society to treat each culture with the respect and equality all deserve. This is essential in order for the planet to evolve in consciousness, as it continues to revolve in space, as it has done for the many cycles that have come before.

David Connolly's insight:

A new exciting experience on archaeology

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Museum's ancient 'gaming' display actually primitive toilet paper - Telegraph

Museum's ancient 'gaming' display actually primitive toilet paper - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A museum which kept ancient artefacts on display believing they were early gaming pieces has discovered they were actually used as a primitive form of toilet paper.
David Connolly's insight:

hmmmmm    still to be convinced on this!  

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BBC News - Fast Track - Will a mock-up of Tutankhamun's tomb pull in tourists?

BBC News - Fast Track - Will a mock-up of Tutankhamun's tomb pull in tourists? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The original tomb of Tutankhamun has deteriorated over the years so an exact replica has been created. But will it pull in the tourists?

David Connolly's insight:

Will tourists really want to travel to Egypt just to visit a mock-up?

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Healing Crystals From Panama’s First Shaman : 80beats

Healing Crystals From Panama’s First Shaman : 80beats | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
very interesting report on this site in panama
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Technique identifies eye and hair color in archaeological remains - Archaeology Magazine

Technique identifies eye and hair color in archaeological remains - Archaeology Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
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300 relics displayed by Archaeological Survey of India at history expo - TOI Mobile | The Times of India Mobile Site

The exhibition, inaugurated at National Museum on December 26, will remain open till January 31 between 10am and 5pm every day except Mondays and Republic Day.
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World's best heritage sites revealed by Which? - January - 2013 - Which? News

Monte Albán in Oaxaca has been rated the world’s best heritage site for visitors by a panel of Which? experts, receiving an expert score of 79%.

The pyramid complex, perched on a mountain top in central Mexico, beat off competition from better-known sites worldwide including the Taj Mahal, Petra, Angkor and the Great Pyramids at Giza in Egypt.

The ten best historic sites to visit on holiday are pictured below. Find out which are the best holiday companies to book your own historic trip with.

David Connolly's insight:

WEll at least Avebury made it to No. 2

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Image Gallery: Ancient Buried Treasure Eluded Romans

Archaeologists have uncovered a significant treasure consisting of 200 bronze coins and various items of gold, silver and bronze jewellery, which were buried by citizens of a town under siege by the Roman army nearly 2,000 years ago.

Live Science reports the valuables were found beneath an ancient fortress in the Crimean settlement of Artezia, in modern day Ukraine.

 

Scientists think wealthy locals buried the treasure in an effort to hide it from the attacking Romans.

 

"It was obvious for the people that they were going to die shortly," wrote Nikolai Vinokurov, a professor at Moscow State Pedagogical University

David Connolly's insight:

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/12/2010/artezian-excavation-on-the-crimean-peninsula  ; for more of the actual excavation and how to get involved.

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Photographs that changed photography - Telegraph

Photographs that changed photography - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
To celebrate 170 years of the camera in the public domain, a look back at how landmark photographs created - and then re-constructed - the history of photography.
David Connolly's insight:

170 years ago, in the summer of 1839, Louis Daguerre convinced the government of France to purchase his invention on behalf of the people of France.  Lets celebrate!

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Pompeii "Wall Posts" Reveal Ancient Social Networks: Scientific American

Pompeii "Wall Posts" Reveal Ancient Social Networks: Scientific American | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Think of it as the earliest version of the Facebook wall post: Ancient Pompeii residents revealed their social networks through graffiti on actual walls.

Now, a new analysis of some of these scribbled messages reveals the walls of the wealthy were highly sought after, especially for political candidates hoping to drum up votes. The findings suggest that Pompeii homeowners may have had some control over who got artistic on their walls, said study researcher Eeva-Maria Viitanen, an archaeologist at the University of Helsinki.

David Connolly's insight:

Another grand article from Stephanie Pappas and LiveScience

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Restoring a Buddhist Monastery on the Trans-Himalaya Salt Route : Past Horizons Archaeology

Restoring a Buddhist Monastery on the Trans-Himalaya Salt Route : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Since 2004, a local Nepali community group, an American volunteer tourism NGO and an Anglo-Nepali architectural/engineering firm have been working together to restore the Chhairo Gompa, an historic Buddhist monastery located along the ancient salt trading route in the Lower Mustang region of Nepal’s Himalayas.

 

At an altitude of 2,680 metres, the Chhairo Gompa sits in a juniper grove on the eastern bank of the Kali Gandaki River near the tiny village of Chhairo. For at least 300 years through the middle of the 20th century, Chhairo Gompa flourished, serving as a monastic centre for Buddhist learning and art as well as the religious centre for the local ethnic Thakali community.  Local belief holds that Chhairo Gompa, also known as Sanga Choling, was established in the 8th Century by the Tibetan Lama Sangye, but its origins are uncertain.  Its existence in the early 1800s is confirmed by royal edicts issued by Bhimsen Thapa, Prime Minister of Nepal from 1806 to 1837.

David Connolly's insight:

What an amazing story and restoration project.

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