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Mexican severed head site revealed : Past Horizons Archaeology

Mexican severed head site revealed : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A gruesome discovery first came to light in winter 2007 in looters holes at an excavation site in Lake Xaltocan, a drained lake in the northern basin of Mexico where Georgia State University’s Christopher Morehart and his wife were studying ancient agricultural technologies and how people interacted with their environment.

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Clovis culture comet catastrophe is a myth : Past Horizons Archaeology

Clovis culture comet catastrophe is a myth : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Researchers from Royal Holloway and the Sandia National Laboratories along with 13 other universities across the United States and Europe, challenge the belief that a large impact or airburst comet or asteroid caused a significant and abrupt change to the Earth’s climate and terminated the Clovis culture. They argue that other explanations must be found for the apparent disappearance.

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Mi‘ilya: Evidence of an Early Crusader Settlement

Mi‘ilya: Evidence of an Early Crusader Settlement | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Fifty-six diagnostic sherds, dating to the Crusader period, were found in a pit. Most of them represent local Crusader types, with a few belonging to imported types.

Via Ancient World Apps
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Fort Vancouver Public Archaeology

Fort Vancouver Public Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The use of information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized archaeological mapping, image recording, and analysis through tools such as GPS, GIS, and digital cameras (Evans and Daly 2006). Gidding et al. (2011) note that archaeologists have been slow to adopt integrated digital recording techniques, relying to an inordinate degree on paper-based recording systems to collect data on archaeological phenomena.


Where archaeologists have utilized digital data, the resultant databases often can answer only very specific research questions (Gidding et al. 2011).


That the challenges of using ICT field collection are becoming less of an issue is evidenced by the recent session at the 2012 Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology conference titled “Using tablet PCs to support field documentation

David Connolly's insight:

THis is going the be the way forward, but there will always always be a place for the pencil, tape and notebook  ( well   for now anyway! )

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Martin Roseveare's comment, January 30, 2013 11:46 AM
We've just built a proper integrated recording system for a project in Iraq (http://www.urarchaeology.org/). It does need proper ground-up design and a complete move away from the file-full-of-paper mindset to be properly useful
David Connolly's comment, January 30, 2013 4:03 PM
Superb! Martin... you of course have made me jealous. This calls for a short article I think!
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Timbuktu, Ancient Seat of Islamic Learning

Timbuktu, Ancient Seat of Islamic Learning | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Timbuktu, the fabled desert city where retreating Muslim extremists destroyed ancient manuscripts, was a center of Islamic learning hundreds of years before Columbus landed in the Americas.

It is not known how many of the priceless documents were destroyed by al Qaida-linked fighters who set ablaze a state-of-the-art library built with South African funding to conserve the brittle, camel-hide bound manuscripts from the harshness of the Sahara Desert climate and preserve them so researchers can study them.

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World Heritage Sites Attacked During War

Discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites, which have been attacked during wars. We show the Sites before war, and where possible, what they looked after being attacked & how UNESCO has helped to resto...
David Connolly's insight:

A remarkable testimony

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Artefacts discovered under Christchurch's Isaac Theatre Royale

Artefacts discovered under Christchurch's Isaac Theatre Royale | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working in Christchurch have stumbled across a “massive” collection of artefacts under the quake-damaged Isaac Theatre Royale.

Eighteen boxes of artefacts were found under the theatre’s foundations during a partial demolition of the heritage building in December last year.

Katharine Watson, director of Underground Overground Archaeology, says the discovery came as a shock to the team.

“We weren’t expecting to find anything,” she says. "It was actually the digger driver who found it.”

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Archaeo News Podcast 223 : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeo News Podcast 223 : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In collaboration with Stonepages, British Archaeological Jobs Resource and Past HorizonsHeadlines

• Ancient Chinese arrowhead found in Japan
• Campaign renewed to save Iron Age fort in Scotland
• Prehistoric headless skeleton unearthed in Cambridgeshire
• Indians ‘broke Australian isolation 4,000 years ago’
• War was central to Europe’s first civilisation
• 4,000-year-old shaman’s stones discovered in Panama
• Baby bones found in ancient Italian village
• Neolithic remains discovered in Istanbul
• Prehistoric rock art site found in Western India
• Stone circle found at church in Northern England
• Storms expose Iron Age skeleton in Shetland
• Intact Neolithic floor surface uncovered in Cyprus
• Vietnamese caves occupied for over 11,000 years
• Mesolithic man should be re-named ‘hunter-gatherer-farmer’
• Modern ‘palaeo diet’ not as good as the original

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Destruction of Timbuktu manuscripts is an offence against the whole of Africa : Past Horizons Archaeology

Destruction of Timbuktu manuscripts is an offence against the whole of Africa : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The reported destruction of two important manuscript collections by Islamist rebels as they fled Timbuktu is an offence to the whole of Africa and its universally important cultural heritage. Like their systematic destruction of 300 Sufi saints’ shrines while they held Timbuktu at their mercy, it is an assault on world heritage comparable with the demolition of the Buddhas of Bamiyan by the Taliban in 2001.

David Connolly's insight:

Be outraged...  but no who to be outraged against.   This is a wealth of Islamic and African literature.   destroyed  by evil men.

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Hanka Šofková's curator insight, January 29, 2013 10:34 AM

Too many years of history! :(

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Archaeology volunteers sought at Counting House | SeacoastOnline.com

Archaeology volunteers sought at Counting House | SeacoastOnline.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — History buffs interested in archaeology have an opportunity this winter to assist Neill De Paoli in processing recently discovered artifacts dating as far back as the mid-1600s.
David Connolly's insight:

There is an opportunity if you are in the area

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Sicilian Mummies Bring Centuries to Life

Sicilian Mummies Bring Centuries to Life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Scientists are using radiology to determine what the specimens once ate, the medicine they took—and how they died.

 

Arrayed in crypts and churches, with leering skulls and parchment skin, the desiccated dead of Sicily have long kept mute vigil.

But now, centuries later, these creepy cadavers have plenty to say.

Five years into the Sicily Mummy Project, six macabre collections are offering scientists a fresh look at life and death on the Mediterranean island from the late 16th century to the mid-20th.

 

Led by anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali of the Department of Cultural Heritage and Sicilian Identity in Palermo (map), the ongoing investigation is revealing how religious men and their wealthy supporters ate, interacted, dealt with disease, and disposed of their dead.

David Connolly's insight:

What can be learnt?   read on

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Pottery grave goods tell us about life : Past Horizons Archaeology

Pottery grave goods tell us about life : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The use of pottery in East Norwegian graves dating from the late Iron Age has been the subject to research work conducted by Christian L. Rødsrud at the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo and reported in ScienceNordic.

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French, Malians retake Timbuktu, rebels torch library

French, Malians retake Timbuktu, rebels torch library | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

French and Malian troops retook control of Timbuktu, a UNESCO World Heritage site, on Monday after Islamist rebel occupiers fled the ancient Sahara trading town and torched several buildings, including a priceless manuscript library.

The United States and European Union are backing a French-led intervention in Mali aimed at removing the threat of radical Islamist jihadists using the West African state's inhospitable desert north as a springboard for international attacks.

The recovery of Timbuktu followed the swift capture by French and Malian forces at the weekend of Gao, another major town in Mali's north that had also been occupied by the alliance of Islamist militant groups since last year.

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Massive earthen mound at Poverty Point constructed in less than 90 days : Past Horizons Archaeology

Massive earthen mound at Poverty Point constructed in less than 90 days : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New research in the current issue of the journal Geoarchaeology, offers compelling evidence that one of the massive earthen mounds at Poverty Point was constructed in less than 90 days, and perhaps as quickly as 30 days — an incredible accomplishment for what was thought to be a loosely organized society consisting of small, widely scattered bands of foragers.

David Connolly's insight:

American culture

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Aztec conquest altered genetics among early Mexico inhabitants : Past Horizons Archaeology

Aztec conquest altered genetics among early Mexico inhabitants : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

For centuries, the fate of the original Otomí inhabitants of Xaltocan, the capital of a pre-Aztec Mexican city-state, has remained unknown. Researchers have long wondered whether they assimilated with the Aztecs or abandoned the town altogether.

David Connolly's insight:

Not what it sounds like...  No aliens, manipulating genetics...  just an interesting look at how groups merge.

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Danielle Boucher's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:34 PM

An article about the Otomi of Xaltocan and the new discoveries that are being made about the population and their affiliation with the Aztec.  This article also deals with the genteics of these peoples and how they have altered over time.

Janelix Lourido's curator insight, February 10, 2013 10:50 PM

Noticia muy interesante que puede causar el surgimiento de  nuevas preguntas acerca de la civilización azteca y de lo que pensamos que conocemos. Por medio del estudio del ADN mitocondrial se pretende descubrir si hubo un cruce entre los Xaltocan y los aztecas.

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Photo Essay: Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account)

Photo Essay:  Archaeology opportunity in Turkey (Includes first-hand account) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Turkey is an archaeologist's dream. Not only does it offer amazing Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Byzantium, and Ottoman ruins, it also offers yet un-explored sites for those interested in archaeology.
David Connolly's insight:

If you ever ever get a chance to go to Turkey!   -  Just go!

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Historic sites under threat | Herald Scotland

Historic sites under threat | Herald Scotland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The University of the Highlands and Islands and Orkney's community archaeologist, Julie Gibson, said: "Scotland has the longest coastline in Europe and, as a maritime nation, much of our heritage relates to the sea. Around Orkney, more than one thousand archaeological sites are threatened or are being actively damaged.

David Connolly's insight:

Too true!

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Historical mapping project nears completion

Historical mapping project nears completion | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A 40-YEAR research project to map York’s historic past is finally nearing completion.

A series of maps showing how the city developed from Roman times to the present day is set to be published, along with essays by leading academics.

Dr Peter Addyman, chairman of York Civic Trust, had the idea of creating the cartographic study of the city’s development when he founded York Archaeological Trust in 1972.

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St Paul – Scripture, Folklore and Archaeology Heritage Trail

St Paul – Scripture, Folklore and Archaeology Heritage Trail | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Heritage Malta will be organising a heritage trail including visits to St Paul’s Catacombs and San Pawl Milqi on Sunday, the 10th of February, the feast of St Paul’s Shipwreck. This heritage trail links writings in the Gospels, folklore and archaeological evidence regarding St Paul, who considerably influenced Malta’s culture and heritage.

The tour will commence with a visit to St Paul’s Catacombs in Rabat. This complex of interconnected, underground Roman cemeteries was in use up to the 4th Century AD. It represents the earliest and largest archaeological evidence of Christianity in Malta. The catacombs were purposely built in this location, on the outskirts of the old Roman capital Melite, as Roman law prohibited burials within the city.

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Where Did Curry Come From?

Where Did Curry Come From? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
What is curry? Today, the word describes a bewildering number of spicy vegetable and meat stews from places as far-flung as the Indian subcontinent, the South Pacific, and the Caribbean Islands.

 

But the original curry predates Europeans’ presence in India by about 4,000 years. Villagers living at the height of the Indus civilization used three key curry ingredients—ginger, garlic, and turmeric—in their cooking. This proto-curry, in fact, was eaten long before Arab, Chinese, Indian, and European traders plied the oceans in the past thousand years.

David Connolly's insight:

Harrapan Curry recipes to follow  :)

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Mali: Timbuktu Locals Saved Some of City’s Ancient Manuscripts from Islamists | TIME.com

Mali: Timbuktu Locals Saved Some of City’s Ancient Manuscripts from Islamists | TIME.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The preservationists of Timbuktu’s centuries-old artifacts have been holding their breath for weeks, waiting for the moment when the French military would seize back Mali’s ancient northern capital from the Islamic militants who have occupied it for 10 months. At stake were the city’s most precious treasures: tens of thousands of centuries-old, priceless calligraphed manuscripts, whose fate under the jihadists’ rule was deeply uncertain.

On Monday, that moment finally came — and by nightfall, the state of Timbuktu’s treasures was as confused as it had been before.

David Connolly's insight:

Could be good news...   well  better than it was!

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Archaeology in Action: Murder in the Dark Peak

First year archaeology students at the University of Sheffield explore a murder in the Peak District.
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NORTH CHARLESTON - New findings suggest Hunley was ‘much closer’ to torpedo blast - The Civil War: 150 Years Later - TheState.com

NORTH CHARLESTON - New findings suggest Hunley was ‘much closer’ to torpedo blast - The Civil War: 150 Years Later - TheState.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
For nearly 150 years, the story of the Hunley’s attack on the USS Housatonic has been Civil War legend.

 

Scientists have discovered a piece of the Confederate submarine’s torpedo still attached to its spar, debunking eyewitness accounts that the Hunley was nearly 100 feet away from the explosion that sent a Union blockade ship to the bottom of the sea off Charleston in 1864.

 

 

David Connolly's insight:

Forensic archaeology changes history. 

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A Feud Between Biblical Archaeologists Goes to Court

A Feud Between Biblical Archaeologists Goes to Court | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
After being stung by criticism (and the cancellation of a lucrative TV deal), one expert sues another for libel. What would Jesus say?

 

Canadian documentary-maker and biblical archaeologist Simcha Jacobovici is suing a retired scientist and former archaeological museum curator named Joe Zias, who has accused him of publicizing scientifically dubious theories.

 

Many of Jacobovici’s documentaries have focused on artifacts that purport to reveal new interpretations of early Christianity, including the notion that the remains of Jesus and his family were buried in a tomb underneath modern-day Jerusalem. Jacobovici claims that the Zias’ criticisms are libelous and have cost him television contracts and money.

 
David Connolly's insight:

Nasty!

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Ancient Egyptians sold themselves into temple slavery : Past Horizons Archaeology

Ancient Egyptians sold themselves into temple slavery : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In the ancient Egyptian city Tebtunis, 2,200 years ago, people voluntarily entered into slave contracts with the local temple for all eternity and they even paid a monthly fee for the privilege. Egyptologist Kim Ryholt from the University of Copenhagen is the first researcher who has studied this puzzling phenomenon

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Hanka Šofková's curator insight, January 29, 2013 10:41 AM

This phenomenon is known in many other ancient civilisations, it is not specific for Egyptians.