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Fiona McCade: Some royal skeletons are best left hidden - News - Scotsman.com

Fiona McCade: Some royal skeletons are best left hidden - News - Scotsman.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
TYPICAL. You wait 528 years for one dead king, then three come along at once.

 

On Monday, archaeologists proudly proclaimed that the skeleton found underneath a car park in Leicester is definitely that of Richard III of England. Now, there is already excited talk of having a proper ferret around for Alfred the Great of Wessex and even Henry I of England, whose bodies have also gone awol over the centuries.

No-one loves history more than me, and I’ve been watching the developments surrounding Richard’s exhumation with great interest, but if we start digging up all the monarchs who missed out on a nice tomb, there are going to be quite a few car-parks turned over before we’re finished.

Frankly, I find it strange how many people are demanding that Richard be given a big funeral – some even want a state funeral – when all that’s happened is that we’ve found a bunch of bones that used to be a king.

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35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis

35 ancient pyramids discovered in Sudan necropolis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

At least 35 small pyramids, along with graves, have been discovered clustered closely together at a site called Sedeinga in Sudan.

 

Discovered between 2009 and 2012, researchers are surprised at how densely the pyramids are concentrated.

 

They date back to a time when a kingdom named Kush flourished in Sudan. Kush shared a border with Egypt and, later on, the Roman Empire. The desire of the kingdom's people to build pyramids was apparently influenced by Egyptian funerary architecture.

 

Because it lasted for hundreds of years they built more, more, more pyramids and after centuries they started to fill all the spaces that were still available in the necropolis." [See Photos of the Newly Discovered Pyramids]

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Google doodle celebrates British archaeologist Mary Leakey's birthday

Google doodle celebrates British archaeologist Mary Leakey's birthday | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Google on Wednesday celebrated the 100th birth anniversary of British archaeologist, Mary Leakey by putting up a doodle on its home page.

The doodle features Mary Leakey at an archaeological site engrossed in excavation. Like in reality, the doodle has two Dalmatians running around her. Mary, a known animal-lover, was generally accompanied in the field by three to four Dalmatians.

 

Interestingly, the doodle also features one of Leakey's major discoveries, "the Laetoli footprints", and some tools used in archaeology.

 

The first three and last two letters of the word Google - G, O Oand L, E -are seen in the background and on her glasses while the Dalmatians replace the  second G of the word.

David Connolly's insight:

happy birthday Mary Leakey

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Mysteries of stone circles in Russia's Bashkiria

Mysteries of stone circles in Russia's Bashkiria | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

For nine years Bashkir scientists have been engaged in the excavation of a monument found in Uchalinsky district, two kilometers from the village of Novo-Bayramgulova. Studying aerial photographs, scientists saw round construction about fifty meters in diameter. These stone circles are comparable to the famous Stonehenge.

According to experts, this may be the ruins of an ancient temple, the remainder of the people of the Neolithic.

Bashkiria has a large number of various archaeological sites. Favorable climatic conditions attracted people to the area since ancient times. However, a construction of this magnitude has not yet been found.
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Timbuktu’s Ancient Libraries: Saved by Locals, Endangered by a Government | TIME.com

Timbuktu’s Ancient Libraries: Saved by Locals, Endangered by a Government | TIME.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

One week after Islamic militants fled Timbuktu under French bombing strikes, preservationists are deeply uncertain about how to continue protecting the city’s priceless ancient documents — a conundrum that cuts to the heart of how treasures are safeguarded through political upheaval in places where locals have little trust in government.

 

When French and African forces rumbled into northern Mali’s ancient capital 10 days ago, Timbuktu’s mayor, who had little direct information, told journalists erroneously that the jihadists had destroyed “all the important documents” and that Malians needed to “kill all the rebels.”

 

In fact, Timbuktu’s residents and preservationists had told TIME early last year that they had rescued tens of thousands of manuscripts before the militants seized northern Mali. They agreed to talk on the condition that TIME kept their secret until the jihadists had been defeated. The operation was conducted by Timbuktu’s old families, which have looked after the city’s 300,000 or so ancient documents for centuries.

 

David Connolly's insight:

Ah...   strange how this time it was the people who preserved and the larger organisations who nearly brought about the loss. 

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Musings of an Unemployed Archaeologist: The Tale of King Richard...

Musings of an Unemployed Archaeologist: The Tale of King Richard... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

With Leicester University's announcement that the human remains discovered in a carpark in September 2012 are in fact those of Richard III, it only seems right the excellent blogger - musingsofanunemployedarchaeologist - should blog about him!


Richard was born on 2nd October 1452 at Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire.  He was the youngest child of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Cecily Neville. During his early years Richard was housed at Middleham Castle, Wensleydale; here he was under the tutelage of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, who was also his cousin.  He seemed to flourish in the environment and developed friendships, it is also where he first met Anne Neville, but we will come back to that later.

David Connolly's insight:

Everything you need to know and more!

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Ancient idols unearthed

Ancient idols unearthed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Workers at construction site 40 km north of Chennai come across rare, 8th century artefacts; archaeologists say this is the first Pallavan-era finding within city limits in recent times

Little did the villagers in Kattupalli near Minjur, some 40 km north of Chennai, realise that digging a pit to earn Rs. 180 a day would lead to an important archaeological discovery and the unearthing of a 1,200-year-old Pallava period structure — the first such finding within city limits in recent times.

David Connolly's insight:

What a superb find!

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Mapping the Layers of Life (Exerpt)

Bulgaria has several little known archaeological sites that potentially hold the answers to key questions about the foundation of western civilisation. Dr Sh...
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Technology in archaeology recording and interpretation

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Richard III dig skull image shown

Richard III dig skull image shown | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An image of a skull which historians believe could be that of Richard III is released ahead of DNA test results being announced.
David Connolly's insight:

Part I

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Workmen find Georgian artefacts at old hospital - Top stories - Scotsman.com

Workmen find Georgian artefacts at old hospital - Top stories - Scotsman.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered a slice of Georgian history on the former site of the Royal Infirmary hospital.

 

Pottery, bits of bottle, coins and buttons from the 18th century were found by workers at what is now Edinburgh University’s High School Yards.

 

A dig took place after contractors drafted in to lay utilities uncovered a series of outer walls from the old royal’s Surgical Hospital, which was built on the site in 1738. Among the highlights was a sixpenny piece dating from 1816 and the reign of George IV.

David Connolly's insight:

Great story,  Jake is a lovely man from AOC Archaeology.   Plus i am from Edinburgh.  What is not to like! 

 

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Notre Dame Cathedral's new bells arrive - Telegraph

Notre Dame Cathedral's new bells arrive - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Nine enormous, new bronze bells have arrived in Paris to give the medieval Notre Dame Cathedral a more modern sound.
David Connolly's insight:

Celebrating 850 years.   The bells were melted down after the revolution.  
Now they are back..  painstaking  reconstructions. 
Can't wait to hear medieval bells..   made in the 21st century

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Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt

Latin American Herald Tribune - Spanish Archaeologists Find 3,550-Year-Old Sarcophagus in Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The discovery of a 3,550-year-old child’s sarcophagus near the southern Egyptian city of Luxor could shed light on a little-known period of Ancient Egypt, Jose Manuel Galan, the head of a Spanish team of archaeologists that made the find, told Efe on Wednesday.

Experts who for the past three years have explored the vicinity of the tombs of Djehuty and Hery, two high-ranking dignitaries of the Egyptian court between 1500 and 1450 B.C., discovered the intact funeral receptacle lying unprotected on the ground a few days ago.

David Connolly's insight:

Nice find 

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Mexican severed head site revealed : Past Horizons Archaeology

Mexican severed head site revealed : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A gruesome discovery first came to light in winter 2007 in looters holes at an excavation site in Lake Xaltocan, a drained lake in the northern basin of Mexico where Georgia State University’s Christopher Morehart and his wife were studying ancient agricultural technologies and how people interacted with their environment.

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Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii

Restoration starts at crumbling ancient city of Pompeii | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ROME -- Conservation work at the crumbling ancient Roman city of Pompeii began Wednesday, a day after police announced a corruption probe into previous restoration work at the site.
David Connolly's insight:

Corruption and conservation...  a heady mix!

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Evie Masterton's curator insight, August 21, 2013 2:23 AM
hey liv nice scoop!
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Remnants of Abandoned Star Wars Sets in Morocco and Tunisia Reminiscent of Ancient Ruins

Remnants of Abandoned Star Wars Sets in Morocco and Tunisia Reminiscent of Ancient Ruins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Italian, New York-based photographer Rä di Martino rouses the Star Wars fan in all of us in Every World's A Stage, a series of photos of the abandoned Hollywood sets constructed for the epic George Lucas film.
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Archaeo News Podcast 224 : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeo News Podcast 224 : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In collaboration with Stonepages, British Archaeological Jobs Resource and Past HorizonsHeadlines

Clovis culture not wiped out by comet
Oldest stone hand axes unearthed
Early sweet potato trade
Human skull found beneath Scottish golf course
Archaeologistsrevise image of ancient Celts
9,000-year-old remains discovered in England
Loom weights reveal weaving in Turkey 2,500 years ago

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Archaeologists discover 12,000-yr-old rock paintings in Betul - Indian Express

Archaeologists discover 12,000-yr-old rock paintings in Betul - Indian Express | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists discover 12,000-yr-old rock paintings in Betul - The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has discovered pre-historic caves with rock paintings dating back to 12,000

 

A team of archaeologists, carrying out explorations on the Satpura ranges in Gawilgarh Hills in the border township of the Tapti-Purna valley stumbled on these ancient paintings, dispelling the myth that Vidarbha and its neighbouring region is bereft of such artistic treasures from our past.

About 71 new rock shelters harbouring paintings and engravings have been found at the site, which may give a tough competition to the World Heritage site of Bhimbetka near Bhopal, ASI officials said.

The decorated rock shelters were discovered by a joint team of ASI's Nagpur-based Pre-history and Excavation Branch-I during the ongoing exploration and documentation work in remote parts of Satpura range.

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Temple Discovery Shows Horrors of war on the ancient borderlands of Israel

Temple Discovery Shows Horrors of war on the ancient borderlands of Israel | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
We are standing in the middle of Israel on a quiet hill overlooking a fertile green valley.

 

Some 3,000 years ago, this peaceful place was right at the center of conflict, says archaeologist Shlomo Bunimovitz

 

The border lies somewhere between here and there,” he says, pointing to the west. He is co-leading excavations which have found the remains of a temple which was later desecrated and used as animal pens.

 

This is Tel Beth-Shemesh, the ancient meeting point of the Canaanites, Philistines and Israelites. The Bible describes it as the northern border of the Tribe of Judah

David Connolly's insight:

Nothing changes

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Digging for Knowledge > News > USC Dornsife

Digging for Knowledge > News > USC Dornsife | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Evening is falling on the ancient Maya kingdom of El Zotz deep in the dense undergrowth of the Guatemalan jungle. A dark tide of bats flows out of a large cave in the nearby mountainside as the last rays of the setting sun illuminate a dramatic series of giant blood-red masks decorating an ancient temple set atop the Diablo Pyramid. Beneath the 40-foot high pyramid lies a burial tomb containing the remains of a Maya king, found with a sacrificial blade lying where his right hand would have been.

Pure Indiana Jones, the scene has attracted widespread international attention as armchair archaeologists the world over follow the latest discoveries at the recently excavated Temple of the Night Sun at El Zotz, headed by Thomas Garrison of the USC Dornsife Department of Anthropology.

The Maya, an advanced Mesoamerican civilization, lived in what is now Guatemala, southern Mexico and Belize, in a series of city-states of varying size and power. While El Zotz was one of the smaller kingdoms, it appears to have more than made up for its size with a keen sense of its own identity and creativity.

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Cultural, heritage events celebrate Florida’s 500th anniversary - The Boston Globe

Cultural, heritage events celebrate Florida’s 500th anniversary - The Boston Globe | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

These days, Florida welcomes more than 87 million tourists a year, but five centuries ago, when Juan Ponce de Leon landed on what is now known as the east coast of Florida, visits from afar were rare. The Spanish explorer’s voyage, a failed attempt to find gold, brought European settlers to the land inhabited by Native Americans and launched a new era in Florida’s history.

To celebrate the New World discovery in 1513, the Sunshine State is hosting a long list of cultural and heritage events under the campaign “Viva Florida 500.”

David Connolly's insight:

500 years and more! 

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Car park skeleton is Richard III

Car park skeleton is Richard III | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A skeleton found beneath a Leicester car park is confirmed by archaeologists as that of English king Richard III.
David Connolly's insight:

Part II

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A new chapter opens in the study of the Assyrian empire : Past Horizons Archaeology

A new chapter opens in the study of the Assyrian empire : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Dr John MacGinnis, a specialist in Assyrian civilisation at Cambridge University’s McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, will fly to the city of Erbil in north east Iraq. En route he will stop off in Turkey where for more than a decade he has been involved in the excavation at the Neo-Assyrian site of Ziyaret Tepe, the ancient garrison town of Tushan.

David Connolly's insight:

One of my favourite areas, where I spent much of my early career.  and what an opportunity for study!

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Munsell: An Archaeologists Perspective

Munsell: An Archaeologists Perspective | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
When do archaeologists use Munsell? CRM archaeologist Chris Webster talks about fieldwork and the importance of accurately identifying color.
David Connolly's insight:

7.5Y/R   is my favourite.. 

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Martin Roseveare's comment, February 2, 2013 10:07 AM
Uhm, not just shade but ambient colour temperature, differences in colour perception, etc, all have a big effect and are rarely properly handled in an archaeological context. There is actually little point in using Munsell colour standards because conditions cannot be sufficiently well controlled. Same goes for taking colour photos of soils - unless a standard colour chart is included in the frame the recorded colours are pretty meaningless as there is nothing to calibrate them against.
David Connolly's comment, February 2, 2013 12:32 PM
Fair point. I was always told the soil should always be moist before taking a reading. but then .. everything always turned out 7.5 Y/R

Intersting point about colour chart for images.
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Petroglyphs stolen from sacred eastern Sierra site recovered

Petroglyphs stolen from sacred eastern Sierra site recovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Petroglyph panels cut and chiseled off an eastern Sierra rock art site sacred to Native Americans have been recovered by federal investigators, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials announced Thursday.
David Connolly's insight:

Caught, but the damage is done.  

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Study raises questions about long-held theories of human evolution : Past Horizons Archaeology

Study raises questions about long-held theories of human evolution : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

What came first: the bipedal human ancestor or the grassland encroaching on the forest? A new analysis of the past 12 million years’ of vegetation change in the cradle of humanity is challenging long-held beliefs about the world in which our ancestors took shape – and, by extension, the impact it had on them.

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