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The Stone Age people of Oberbipp

The Stone Age people of Oberbipp | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A sensational archaeological discovery has been made in canton Bern: a community grave dating back 5,000 years, containing 30 bodies and Stone Age artifacts. It is the first intact burial chamber to be found north of the alps.
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The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival - Archaeological Institute of America Latest News

The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival - Archaeological Institute of America Latest News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival Archaeological Institute of America Latest News The five-day film festival will feature expert speakers (beginning with Vince Porter, executive director of the Governor's Office of Film...
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Mummified animals preserved in Turkish cave

Mummified animals preserved in Turkish cave | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The conditions of Çankırı’s Salt Cave have preserved the bodies of animals for decades. The cave, which is an important salt reserve in the country, is one of the main attractions of the Central Anatolian region

 

In the salt cave (tuz mağarası) of the central Anatolian provinceof Çankırı, the bodies of dead animals do not decompose; rather they are preserved by the atmosphere of the cave, where salt has been produced for 5,000 years, dating back to the Hittite period.

The body of a donkey found 200 years ago in the cave as well as that of a rabbit found five years ago and a snake found two years ago are displayed in the grotto as they were found.

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Edinburgh First World War trench survey begins

Edinburgh First World War trench survey begins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
WORLD renowned experts have begun a major survey aimed at unlocking the secrets of the Capital’s First World War trenches.

 

The network of trenches at Dreghorn Woods, Colinton, which will cost an estimated £10,000 to save, were almost forgotten and had been left to become overgrown by trees. In December, Edinburgh City Council awarded £3500 to enable survey work to take place following months of campaigning by writer and historian Lynne Gladstone-Millar and the Evening News, calling for the trenches to be preserved.

David Connolly's insight:

With the coming anniversary of the outbreak of World War I as well.   this is a timely reminder.   lest we forget...  Lynne Gladstone-Millar's father and his friend, were the only survivors of his year at Edinburgh University.  who went to war, training at these very trenches.  This can be a lasting memorial. 

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Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias – Biblical Archaeology Society

Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias – Biblical Archaeology Society | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Charles Fellows in Aphrodisias

 

British archaeologist and explorer Sir Charles Fellows (1799–1860) discovered the ruins of a number of ancient cities in Asia Minor (modern Turkey), including Xanthus, the ancient capital of Lycia, which he excavated under the sponsorship of the British Museum but he funded personally. He was knighted in 1845 for his assistance in having marble reliefs and monuments from this area brought to England. Public response to their London exhibit was sensational.
On his way to Lycia, Fellows spent three days at Aphrodisias. The following account of his visit to Aphrodisias is taken from the meticulously documented and illustrated report he presented to the British Museum, published as An Account of Discoveries in Lycia, being a Journal Kept during a Second Excursion in Asia Minor (1840). In it he describes the relationship of the pagan and Christian ruins at the site.

David Connolly's insight:
An Early Account of Turkey's Roman and Christian City
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We Told You So: Richard III Society Celebrates Their Hero’s Rediscovery

We Told You So: Richard III Society Celebrates Their Hero’s Rediscovery | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A group of Richard III’s defenders say he wasn't the monster of history. Alas the evidence proves otherwise, says Dan Jones.
For a stalwart group of Richard III’s defenders the exhumation of his bones gives a chance to press their case that he wasn’t the monster of history and literature. Alas, says Dan Jones, the evidence proves otherwise
David Connolly's insight:

You have to be quite a bastard to get your own royal fan club

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Ice Age Lion Man is world’s earliest figurative sculpture - The Art Newspaper

Ice Age <i>Lion Man</i> is world’s earliest figurative sculpture - The Art Newspaper | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

he star exhibit initially promised for the British Museum’s “Ice Age Art” show will not be coming—but for a good reason. New pieces of Ulm’s Lion Man sculpture have been discovered and it has been found to be much older than originally thought, at around 40,000 years. This makes it the world’s earliest figurative sculpture. At the London exhibition, which opens on 7 February, a replica from the Ulm Museum will instead go on display. The story of the discovery of the Lion Man goes back to August 1939, when fragments of mammoth ivory were excavated at the back of the Stadel Cave in the Swabian Alps, south-west Germany. This was a few days before the outbreak of the Second World War. When it was eventually reassembled in 1970, it was regarded as a standing bear or big cat, but with human characteristics.

David Connolly's insight:

Is this not the most amazing item from the Palaeolithic/ 

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Temple Of Mithras Stays Boxed As City’s Big Dig Continues

Temple Of Mithras Stays Boxed As City’s Big Dig Continues | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Roman remains still waiting in storage.

 

British archaeology has enjoyed a surge of interest of late, with the recent unearthing of Richard III in a certain Leicester car park. However, one London archaeological site remains in limbo: the Temple of Mithras is still waiting for its new home, as one of the City’s biggest ever digs continues.

 

The temple, dating from 240AD, has been dismantled and is currently in storage with the Museum of London. It’s awaiting a permanent home in the rebuilt Bucklersbury House on Queen Victoria Street, which is set to be the European headquarters of media giant Bloomberg LP.

 

Part of the delay has to do with ongoing excavation work on the Queen Victoria Street site, which has evolved into the Walbrook Discovery Programme, one of the largest digs undertaken in the City of London, according to MOLA, with more than 50 archaeologists combing through the mud of the Roman River Walbrook.

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You Had to Be Strong Just to Wear the Armor as a Viking

Watch this webisode and find more videos narrated by Colm Feore at http://www.museumsecrets.tv. Museum Secrets Season 3 - Premiere TV Broadcast in Canada Sta...
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Palaeopathology: Two recent case studies : Past Horizons Archaeology

Palaeopathology: Two recent case studies : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Palaeopathology, the study of ancient diseases in human or animal remains usually means analysis of the skeletal material to examine the diseases effect on the bone. However, palaeopathology is not a straightforward science with many diseases not even appearing on the bone, and when they do, they present very similar manifestations but with very different causes.

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Stone Age Stew? Soup Making May Be Older Than We'd Thought : NPR

Stone Age Stew? Soup Making May Be Older Than We'd Thought : NPR | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
There's nothing better on a cold day than a warm bowl of soup. But when did our ancestors first brew up this tasty broth? New archaeological evidence suggests that soup making could be tens of thousands of years old.
David Connolly's insight:

thoughtful discussion on the evidence for prehistoric cooking, and a nice bowl of soup. 

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The brilliant beads of 'Cleopatra's necklace': Ancient Egyptian jewellery ... - Daily Mail

The brilliant beads of 'Cleopatra's necklace': Ancient Egyptian jewellery ... - Daily Mail | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
The brilliant beads of 'Cleopatra's necklace': Ancient Egyptian jewellery ...
Daily Mail
Intrigue: Professor Borodovsky suspects that the necklace arrived in Siberia via silk road through modern-day Kazakhstan.
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West Mersea: Ancient bones found on island to be analysed by experts

West Mersea: Ancient bones found on island to be analysed by experts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
THE mystery behind ancient remains found on the island of West Mersea could soon be solved.

 

The site was excavated in 1912 by Samuel Hazzledine Warren, who came across a central burial chamber containing a box with a Roman glass urn housing the cremated remains of human bones.

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York Minster discoveries shine light on period between Romans and Vikings : Past Horizons Archaeology

York Minster discoveries shine light on period between Romans and Vikings : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

he recent excavation of a pair of Viking feet and a tiny silver Anglo-Saxon coin may lack the glamour of the discovery of the last Plantagenet, but it has shone a light on one of the least known periods in the long history of York Minister: the centuries between the fall of Roman empire and the coming of the Vikings, in AD866.

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War of Roses graves lie in wait for HS2 route

War of Roses graves lie in wait for HS2 route | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The battle of Edgcote was one of the bloodiest clashes of the wars. Now its site could be threatened by the high speed rail link

High-speed rail may have met its most formidable opponent yet – the ghosts of a Welsh army slaughtered fighting for an English king more than 500 years ago.

As many as 5,000 soldiers from Wales, including more than 180 knights and noblemen, lie buried somewhere in farmland north of Banbury, Oxfordshire. In the centuries after they were cut down, at the battle of Edgcote in 1469, one of the bloodiest clashes of the Wars of the Roses, the precise location was forgotten.

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Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head

Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A hairdresser at a Baltimore salon has stuck a pin in the long-held assumptions among historians about the hairstyles of ancient Rome and Greece.

 

By day, Janet Stephens is a hairdresser at a Baltimore salon, trimming bobs and wispy bangs. By night she dwells in a different world. At home in her basement, with a mannequin head, she meticulously re-creates the hairstyles of ancient Rome and Greece.

 

Ms. Stephens is a hairdo archaeologist.

 

Her amateur scholarship is sticking a pin in the long-held assumptions among historians about the complicated, gravity-defying styles of ancient times. Basically, she has set out to prove that the ancients probably weren't wearing wigs after all.

 

"This is my hairdresserly grudge match with historical representations of hairstyles," says Ms. Stephens, who works at Studio 921 Salon & Day Spa, which offers circa 21st-century haircuts.

David Connolly's insight:

A cut above the rest!

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Is Alfred the Great buried in unmarked grave in Winchester's St Bartholomew’s church? Archaeologists set to dig for his body

Is Alfred the Great buried in unmarked grave in Winchester's St Bartholomew’s church? Archaeologists set to dig for his body | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A team of archaeologists believe bones buried in an unmarked grave in Winchester could be those of the 9th Century Saxon leader
David Connolly's insight:

On behalf of the archaeoloigsts of Britian.. 

sorry!  :0

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Our intestinal bacteria have national characteristics

Our intestinal bacteria have national characteristics | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The bacteria in our intestines are different depending on which country we live in.

 

National differences between people are not restricted to appearance and behaviour. Deep in our intestines live trillions of bacteria, which also differ according to which country we’re from.

Now a Danish-led project sets out to compare the characteristics of Indian intestinal bacteria with their Danish counterparts.

David Connolly's insight:

Although not strictly archaeology - you can see how this could inform population movement/ 

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Sword Fighting As It Was For the Vikings

Watch this webisode and find more videos narrated by Colm Feore at http://www.museumsecrets.tv. Museum Secrets Season 3 - Premiere TV Broadcast in Canada Sta...
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US Route 301 Archaeology Update | DelDOT Blogs

US Route 301 Archaeology Update | DelDOT Blogs | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Winter Archaeology Brrr.... It's cold outside but but sometimes archaeologists must work through the winter to help keep tight project schedules.
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Battle for Richard’s burial is long lost -

Battle for Richard’s burial is long lost - | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The battle for the final resting place of King Richard III seems already won after it was revealed the decision is in the hands of university experts.

 

More than 11,000 people have signed a petition calling for Richard to be re-interred in York and York Council is writing to the Queen and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) to lay claim to the remains of the last Plantagenet king.

 

But yesterday the MoJ said an archaeological exhumation licence had been issued which required details of where the remains would be laid to rest.

It said: “The licence we issued states that [the University of Leicester] would, no later than August 31, 2014, deposit the remains at Jewry Wall Museum or have them interred at St Martin’s Cathedral or in a burial ground in which interments may legally take place. The precise location of reburial is now for the University of Leicester.”

David Connolly's insight:

Read the small print! 

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Slippers of Napoleon Bonaparte’s sister uncovered in museum : Past Horizons Archaeology

Slippers of Napoleon Bonaparte’s sister uncovered in museum : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A pair of tiny silk and leather slippers belonging to Napoleon Bonaparte’s sister have lain unnoticed in the vast collections of the University of Aberdeen for more than 140 years

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Excavation gives up all the dirt on ancient earthen mound - NBCNews.com

Excavation gives up all the dirt on ancient earthen mound - NBCNews.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
NBCNews.com
Excavation gives up all the dirt on ancient earthen mound
NBCNews.com
The enormous earthen monument Poverty Point, built on a Mississippi River bayou some 3,200 years ago, is an impressive feat of engineering.
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Richard III Mania: Understanding a Kingly Obsession

Richard III Mania: Understanding a Kingly Obsession | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The world’s atwitter over the discovery of a British king’s 500-year-old bones. But why?
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Ancient Words: Deciphering an Ancient People and Their Language in El Salvador

Ancient Words: Deciphering an Ancient People and Their Language in El Salvador | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Who Were the Ancient Mountain Dwellers of Coastal El Salvador?

 

It’s difficult to recognize and understand the meaning of ancient texts, words, symbols and the messages they contain.  This is not only due to the very complexity of systems of communication, but mostly because we often don’t see them. During the holidays, I had the opportunity to go to the field with Marlon Escamilla, a Salvadoran archaeologist and Ph.D. candidate from Vanderbilt University, who’s thesis focuses on the archaeology of the people who inhabited the Balsamo Mountain Range in coastal western El Salvador. While Escamilla focuses mostly on the Pre-Columbian structures that were built on the very ridges of the jagged mountain tops, the valleys and small canyons may hold clues to the very nature of the people who once lived in this region.

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