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Scottish Island Find Digs Up New Info on Neolithic Religion

Scottish Island Find Digs Up New Info on Neolithic Religion | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A new archaeological find in the Orkney Islands off the northern tip of Scotland could have connections to Neolithic religion.
David Connolly's insight:

One of the best sites in the world  :)

and I recognise Adam Stanford photos when I see em! 

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:20 PM

Science... it never ceeses to amaze me.

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Rotterdam archaeologists find old shoe stuffed with medieval money

Rotterdam archaeologists find old shoe stuffed with medieval money | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists in Rotterdam have found an old shoe stuffed with 477 silver coins during excavations behind the town hall.


Archaeologists say they have never before found a shoe filled with money, which ranges in dates from 1472 to 1592. On theory is that the owner of the shoe hid it under floorboards to protect it during the 80 Years War (1568-1648).


David Connolly's insight:

better than banknotes in a sock!

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Upper Palaeolithic burials no more sophisticated than Neanderthals : Past Horizons Archaeology

Upper Palaeolithic burials no more sophisticated than Neanderthals : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A new study examining upper Palaeolithic burial practices in Eurasia shows the burial practices varied widely, as some graves were filled with a large number of personal and ritual items while the vast majority were fairly simple.

David Connolly's insight:

The nub of it is that Neanderthal and Early human burials are in general similar in their simple nature - dig hole - bury.   and as we have so few, the stand out examples (often from later periods, skew the perception.  

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The Knights of Malta: a thorn in the Ottomans’ side

The Knights of Malta: a thorn in the Ottomans’ side | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
For centuries, the Knights of Malta and the Ottomans were enemies. The knights have just celebrated their 900th
anniversary...

If any of you happened to be watching “euronews” just three days before Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation, you might have seen a long procession of men wearing black cloaks with white Maltese crosses slowly moving into the St. Peter’s Basilica for a meeting with the pope. These were today’s Knights of Malta, officially the Order of Malta, the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta.

 

The occasion was the 900th anniversary of the presentation of the Papal decree in 1113, which gave the order official status, although it was founded 60 years before that. Seeing them conjured up memories of the kingdom of Jerusalem, the Saracens and Saladin, Cyprus, Rhodes and finally the Battle of La Valletta on the island of Malta where some 30,000 Ottoman soldiers met their deaths in 1565.

David Connolly's insight:

a fascinating story

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Lost Collections of the Ancient World : Past Horizons Archaeology

Lost Collections of the Ancient World : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The story started in January 2011, when Paige Glenen and Katie Urban made an incredible discovery in storage rooms at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. The pair found box after box of artefacts labelled simply  as “Old World Roman.”

David Connolly's insight:

WOW!!

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Cornell Chronicle: Archaeology and material studies institute created

Cornell Chronicle: Archaeology and material studies institute created | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A period of explosive growth in archaeology-related teaching and research at Cornell has culminated in the establishment of the new Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies (CIAMS).

CIAMS will "leverage the interdisciplinary nature of the field today in order to generate the new ideas and collaborations which will lead the field tomorrow," said Sturt Manning, CIAMS director and the Goldwin Smith Professor of Classical Archaeology.

"The 'material studies' part of the CIAMS name reflects a renewed engagement with the material world," Manning explained. "Many of the fundamental challenges of our time -- climate change, social inequality, gun control -- not to mention values we hold regarding aesthetics and behaviors -- all emerge out of centuries and even millennia of human interaction with the vast world of material objects."

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Aztec sacrifices at Tenochtitlán : Past Horizons Archaeology

Aztec sacrifices at Tenochtitlán : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Offerings in the ancient Templo Mayor in Tenochtitlán (now in modern Mexico City) have been linked to the cycle of the agricultural seasons and involved human sacrifice to Quilaztli Cihuacóatl, one of the  Aztec goddesses of earth and fertility.

David Connolly's insight:

Bit of a mixed feeling about this one.   but fascinating insight into the dark mind of the Aztec Priest.   Did they really believe this was needed?   

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Janelix Lourido's comment, March 5, 2013 8:49 PM
Los sacrificios humanos fueron muy practicados por la mayoría sino por todas las civilizaciones pre colombinas ya que por medio de estos se mantenían en contacto con sus deidades y estas contentas con sus ofrendas le retribuían en cosechas abundantes, evitando sequías y otros fenómenos naturales.
joseph mora's curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:19 PM

the Aztecs would perdorm rituals and sacrifices

Jonathan's curator insight, November 7, 2014 12:19 PM

Aztec

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Hypostyle Project :: The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project :: University of Memphis

Hypostyle Project :: The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project :: University of Memphis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Karnak Great Hypostyle Hall Project is a joint endeavor of the University of Memphis, in Memphis, Tennessee (U.S.A.), and the Université de Québec à Montréal (Canada). We work in cooperation with Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities and the Centre Franco-égyptien d’études des temples de Karnak (France). For more information contact the Project Director Dr. Peter J. Brand.

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Enjoy this website and get lost in it's grandeur!

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Stonehenge: A Digital Archaeology - BBC News

Stonehenge: A Digital Archaeology - BBC News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Stonehenge: A Digital Archaeology
BBC News
Meet our archaeological expert to learn about the recent digital study of Stonehenge and the new discoveries there. clock 10:00–15:00. Suitable for any age. Hands on History logo.
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Iraqis, foreign teams work together to excavate ancient sites

Iraqis, foreign teams work together to excavate ancient sites | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As part of its work programme for the current year, the ministry has reached agreements with six archaeological teams from Italy, the United Kingdom and the Czech Republic," Hakim al-Shammary, director of the tourism minister's media office, told Mawtani.

The teams will begin excavations at a number of sites, particularly in the south, he said.

"Among the sites to be excavated are ancient hills such as Tal Abu Tuwaira in the city of al-Nasiriya, Tal al-Baqarat in al-Kut and Tal Abu Shathar in Maysan province, as well as other sites in al-Dalmaj marshes," he said.

Iraqi archaeologists and excavators will work alongside these teams to acquire additional skills, using advanced equipment to salvage relics and identify historical periods, and learning how to preserve the pieces, al-Shammary said.

 

David Connolly's insight:

Excellent news.   and best wishes to the friends who are involved. 

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Prehistoric Porn: Chinese petroglyphs from the Bronze Age feature some of the world’s oldest depictions of sexual copulation

Prehistoric Porn: Chinese petroglyphs from the Bronze Age feature some of the world’s oldest depictions of sexual copulation | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In prehistoric times, pornography was carved in stone.
David Connolly's insight:

we...  not quite, if you read the original article.   but nicer images  :)
http://csen.org/Articles_Reivews/Kangjiashimenji%20/Kanj-Text/Kanj.html


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How The King Of Norway Pulled Down London Bridge

How The King Of Norway Pulled Down London Bridge | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Ethelred the Unready’s bid to reclaim the English crown in 1014 by pulling down London Bridge is enshrined in the Nordic sagas – because he had help from a future King of Norway.

England had been coming under repeated Danish attack since about 991. In 1013, Swein Forkbeard launched a brilliant attack on southern England, with London finally capitulating in February 1014, forcing Ethelred to flee. However, Swein died soon after, and Ethelred decided to try and retake his city and Southwark (known as Suthverki) from the remaining Danish troops. But there was one major problem: London Bridge.

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Treasures revealed in ancient cist

Treasures revealed in ancient cist | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A rare and "amazing" burial discovery dating back 4,000 years has been described as the most significant find on Dartmoor and has given archaeologists a glimpse into the lives of the people who once lived there.

The discovery of a bronze age granite cist, or grave, in 2011 in a peat bog on White Horse Hill revealed the first organic remains found on the moor and a hoard of about 150 beads.

As the National Park's archaeologists levered off the lid they were shocked by what lay beneath.

The park's chief archaeologist, Jane Marchand, said: "Much to our surprise we actually found an intact cremation deposit [human bones] which is actually a burial alongside a number of grave goods.

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Human mouth in 'a permanent state of disease'

Human mouth in 'a permanent state of disease' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
PEOPLE can brush their teeth as much as they like, but our mouths will never be as healthy as those of our ancient ancestors.
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Smile!

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Archaeology and Community: Experiences in the Azraq Oasis | The ASOR Blog

Archaeology and Community: Experiences in the Azraq Oasis | The ASOR Blog | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

By: Alison Damick, Columbia University, and Ahmad Lash, The Department of Antiquities of Jordan

Azraq, an oasis village in the northeastern Jordanian steppe, sits on the crossroads of the highways connecting Jordan to Saudi Arabia and Iraq [Fig 1]. Its remarkable archaeological record reflects millennia of human activity; the first recorded human occupation in the Azraq Basin dates to more than 300,000 years ago. Including prehistoric, Roman, Byzantine, and early and middle Islamic sites, the 13,000 km² basin area currently hosts a total of 157 documented archaeological sites. A great concern of recent years has been how to effectively protect those sites from the various threats they face, including environmental degradation and erosion, increased vehicle traffic, construction projects and looting. Co-emergent with this concern is the increasing interest among archaeologists in the close relationship between the contemporary world of which archaeological practice is a part and the narrative of the past that is produced from its activities. In 2008, the Azraq Community Archaeology Program (ACAP) was initiated to address these issues. We’d like to use this brief presentation of our experiences with the project to raise some of the issues we’ve encountered in practice and in theory, as launching pads for further discussion.

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Something very close to our hearts#


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ARCHAEOLOGY - Eros mosaic found in southern Turkish city

ARCHAEOLOGY - Eros mosaic found in southern Turkish city | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A mosaic featuring an Eros figure fishing on horse has been found in the southern province of Adana’s Yumurtalık district. The half fish-half horse Eros, which is called Hippocampus in Greek mythology, is claimed to be the one and only such mosaic in the world.

Made up of marble, glass and stone, the mosaic is estimated to date back to the late Roman or early Byzantine era.

The Adana Museum Directorate has initiated archaeological excavations in the region where the mosaic was discovered.

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Archaeological site found at Binghamton's MacArthur school

Archaeological site found at Binghamton's MacArthur school | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

MacArthur Elementary School sits right by an archaeological site along the Vestal Parkway.

So when Nina Versaggi was enlisted to check the property for remnants of prehistoric settlements — part of the process in the potential rebuilding of the flood-ravaged school — she assumed there would be something there.

Versaggi, the director of Binghamton University’s Public Archaeology Facility, was right.

“We found hundreds of byproducts of toolmaking,” she said. “But no actual tools.”

David Connolly's insight:

What a good story.

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Ancient copper plates, gold coins found in Karnataka temple

Ancient copper plates, gold coins found in Karnataka temple | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeological Survey of India makes discovery during restoration work at Pranaveswara temple in Talagunda

While the copper plates, datable to the 12 century CE, belong to the Kalachurya dynasty, the gold coins were issued by the Ganga rulers, who held sway in the State from the 4th century CE to the 12 century CE.

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Martin Roseveare's comment, February 22, 2013 5:04 AM
There is so much to be found in South Asia...
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Treasure-filled warrior's grave found in Russia

Treasure-filled warrior's grave found in Russia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Hidden in a necropolis situated high in the mountains of the Caucasus in Russia, researchers have discovered the grave of a male warrior laid to rest with gold jewelry, iron chain mail and numerous weapons, including a 36-inch iron sword set between his legs.

That is just one amazing find among a wealth of ancient treasures dating back more than 2,000 years that scientists have uncovered there.

Among their finds are two bronze helmets, discovered on the surface of the necropolis. One helmet (found in fragments and restored) has relief carvings of curled sheep horns while the other has ridges, zigzags and other odd shapes.

David Connolly's insight:

Super cool find.   Though is it me...  I am more intersted in the people

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1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick

1 Kitty, 2 Empires, 2,000 Years: World History Told Through a Brick | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
How did a Roman brick from the British Isles get to Washington state's Fort Vancouver?
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Stolen treasure: The Coggalbeg hoard | Irish Archaeology

Stolen treasure: The Coggalbeg hoard | Irish Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A 4,000 year old treasure of golden objects that was stolen on a dark night in March 2009.

 

The remarkable tale of the Coggalbeg hoard. This story begins in March 1945 when a Roscommon farmer, Mr Hubert Lannon, was cutting turf on his bog in the west of Ireland.  As he sliced through the dark peaty soil a flash of gold suddenly caught his eye. Bending down for a closer inspection he slowly uncovered a hoard of golden treasure. It consisted of a beautiful gold lunula and two gold discs, which had lain hidden in the depths of the bog for over 4,000 years. Hubert carefully gathered the precious items together and then brought them home for safe keeping.

 

An item of great prestige it was probably originally worn around the neck. Lunulae, such as this one, appear to be a distinctively insular form of jewellery, with the vast majority of the 100 or so known examples coming from Ireland. They are a striking testament to the metal working skills of our Early Bronze Age ancestors.

David Connolly's insight:

Enjoy the full story ! 

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Loch Leven discovery linked to Scottish freedom fighter

Loch Leven discovery linked to Scottish freedom fighter | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Loch Leven discovery linked to Scottish freedom fighter
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La saga del "Hobbit" pone en evidencia una ciencia en crisis - Arqueología, Historia Antigua y Medieval - Terrae Antiqvae

La saga del "Hobbit" pone en evidencia una ciencia en crisis - Arqueología, Historia Antigua y Medieval - Terrae Antiqvae | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Digamos lo obvio: la evolución humana no deja de tener su drama, y la última andanada en curso sobre el Hobbit, u Homo floresiensis, confirma esta batalla una vez más. El anuncio en 2004 del Homo floresiensis -apodado "el Hobbit"- marcó el inicio de una saga muy frecuente en el ámbito enrarecido de la evolución humana. Inmediatamente después de su anuncio, los antropólogos se dividieron a lo largo de líneas compartidas y ampliamente arraigadas para apoyar u oponerse a tal hallazgo como algo novedoso para la ciencia.


Via Terrae Antiqvae
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Archaeologists to survey and record prehistoric Himalayas : Past Horizons Archaeology

Archaeologists to survey and record prehistoric Himalayas : Past Horizons Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A team of archaeologists from the University of York are to travel to the roof of the world to discover, survey, and record mountain archaeology in the Nepalese Himalayas.

The Himalayan Exploration and Archaeological Research Team (HEART) will spend four weeks documenting high-altitude artefact scatters, rock shelters and formerly inhabited hand-cut cave systems that were used either as settlements and tombs dating back to the 3rd century BC.

David Connolly's insight:

Super Cool!   well...  chilly actually.   _  We think this is the new frontier of archaeology

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