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Unearthing Ancient Sweden Through Archaeology

Unearthing Ancient Sweden Through Archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
With over 25,000 Iron Age graveyards and burial mounds, 1,140 megalithic structures of all sizes, and about 2,500 large rune stones, Sweden is an archaeologist's paradise.
David Connolly's insight:

James Blake Wiener of the Ancient History Encyclopedia speaks to Dr. Martin Rundkvist, a Swedish archaeologist, about his most recent work in attempting to locate a Geatish mead-hall in the archaeologically rich province of Östergötland. With humor and insight, Rundkvist shares his thoughts and enthusiasm.

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Topofly: Hillforts from On High

Topofly: Hillforts from On High | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As part of a pilot case study for my PhD I have been putting together a series or aerial photographs focused on some local Hillforts. I was recently assisted with a Historic Scotland Sponsorship Award which has enabled me in incorporate some photography from somewhat higher altitudes than I am used to - with the hire of a Cessna 172 light aircraft. For this brief flight I picked a morning shortly after some heavy snowfall and, ably assisted by photographer Kieran Duncan, set off on a route which tied in various sites.

David Connolly's insight:

More brilliant work from Keiran Baxter!

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Origins of human teamwork found in chimpanzees : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Origins of human teamwork found in chimpanzees : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Teamwork has been fundamental in humanity’s greatest achievements but scientists have found that working together has its evolutionary roots in our nearest primate relatives – chimpanzees.

A series of trials by scientists found that chimpanzees not only coordinate actions with each other but also understand the need to help a partner perform their role to achieve a common goal.

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Vincent Picton's curator insight, August 18, 2014 10:07 AM

If these creatures can do it ... then everybody should be able to.

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Lessons for Today From 5 Ancient Civilizations

Lessons for Today From 5 Ancient Civilizations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

This April, National Geographic explorers and other experts in five of the world's oldest civilizations will gather in Guatemala to discuss how the past can be a window to the future.

At least five distinct times in world history, human beings created a unique writing system that allowed them to organize their thoughts and record and transmit information like never before: the Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Chinese, People of the Indus Valley, and the Maya. They each spread to inspire more written systems (for example the Latin alphabet we use comes from Phonecian, which stems ultimately from Egyptian).

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:15 AM

talks about Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Chinese, People of the Indus Valley, and the Mayans and some importance in which they impacted.

joseph mora's curator insight, November 14, 2013 11:26 PM

what we could learn from ancient civilizations

Chris Tat's curator insight, January 17, 2014 10:15 PM

I thought this article was intriguing because our blog for this week was to compare ancient civilization to modern day civilization.  I am awe stricken that even in ancient times, human beings created a unique writing system.  It is crazy to think that the tradition of writing has been passed down from generation to generation for years.

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Digging deep to meet stone age ancestors - Entertainment

Digging deep to meet stone age ancestors - Entertainment | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
When asked to showcase the result of a two-week dig at Goldsborough, archaeologist Rachel Grahame holds up a brick of charred sandstone and several pieces of flint no bigger than a fingernail.
David Connolly's insight:

Showing that commercial archaeology and research can happen!

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Cultural idea of caveman’s healthy living a paleofantasy

Cultural idea of caveman’s healthy living a paleofantasy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Popular misconceptions about evolution have led people to try protein-rich Paleo-diets, run barefoot and sleep around, as if the cave people had it right all along
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Trove of Irish Historical Artifacts in County Mayo

Trove of Irish Historical Artifacts in County Mayo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An Irish historian planned to spend six weeks organizing Jackie Clarke’s collection of more than 100,000 items documenting Ireland’s struggle to free itself of English rule, but eight years later, she’s still at it.
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3200 year old sundial guides archaeologists into the past : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

3200 year old sundial guides archaeologists into the past : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

During the 2013 season of the Valley of the Kings Project carried out by University of Basel, Prof. Susanne Bickel’s team have found a number of exciting artefacts including what they suspect to be one of the oldest portable sundials in the area between tombs KV 29 and 61.

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600-year-old Chinese coin found on Kenyan island : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

600-year-old Chinese coin found on Kenyan island : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

joint expedition of scientists led by Chapurukha M. Kusimba of The Field Museum and Sloan R. Williams of the University of Illinois at Chicago has unearthed a 600-year-old Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda that shows trade existed between China and east Africa decades before European explorers set sail and changed the map of the world.

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Neanderthal big eyes 'caused demise'

Neanderthal big eyes 'caused demise' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A study of Neanderthal skulls suggests that they became extinct because they had larger eyes than our species.
David Connolly's insight:

hmmm  this calls for a more detailed look at the research...  this seems an over simplification

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1,200-year-old Egyptian text describes a shape-shifting Jesus

1,200-year-old Egyptian text describes a shape-shifting Jesus | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
By Owen JarusLiveScience A newly deciphered Egyptian text, dating back almost 1,200 years, tells part of the crucifixion story of Jesus with apocryphal plot twists, some of which have never been seen before.
David Connolly's insight:

You have to love this version

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Kyle Kunkel O'Connor's curator insight, March 14, 2013 12:31 PM

new views on religion, interesting topis, religion, alternative history

 

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Human Ancestors Were Fashion Conscious - ScienceNOW

Human Ancestors Were Fashion Conscious - ScienceNOW | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The 2013 Academy Awards were, as always, as much about making appearances as about making films, as red carpet watchers noted fashion trends and faux pas. Both Jessica Chastain and Naomi Watts wore Armani, although fortunately not the same dress. And Best Supporting Actress Anne Hathaway switched from Valentino to a controversial pale pink Prada at the last minute because her original dress looked too much like someone else's. Of course, no actress would be caught dead wearing the same style 2 years in a row. A new study of ancient beaded jewelry from a South African cave finds that ancient humans were no different, avoiding outdated styles as early as 75,000 years ago.

Personal ornaments, often in the form of beads worn as necklaces or bracelets, are considered by archaeologists as a key sign of sophisticated symbolic behavior, communicating either membership in a group or individual identity. Such ornaments are ubiquitous in so-called Upper Paleolithic sites in Europe beginning about 40,000 years ago, where they were made from many different materials—animal and human teeth, bone and ivory, stone, and mollusk shells—and often varied widely among regions and sites.

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Rich slice of history

Rich slice of history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Will there be any efforts to restore the Badami Trikutalaya and the inscriptions that look pale on the white-washed walls?

(This is the first of a two-part article that speaks about the Chalukyan temples and their architecture, found mostly in and around Karnataka)

The ancient name of Badami was – Badami. Vatapi was the Sanskrit name that the Chalukyas gave it, when they ruled over the area. Dr. Silakant Pathar, whose D. Litt thesis was ‘Badami- A cultural study,’ says the Chalukyas changed many Kannada names into Sanskrit. For example, Kisuvolal (red town) became Raktapura.

Archaeologist Dr. A. Sundara, who surveyed 2,000 villages in Maharashtra and Karnataka, when he was with the Archeological Survey of India, has an interesting interpretation about how the association of the area with the asura Vatapi might have come about.

David Connolly's insight:

Part of a new article on the  temple architecture in India

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Latest Results: Alfoldean

Latest Results: Alfoldean | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
About a year and a half ago, I started working with the Horsham District Archaeology Group at Alfoldean.

Via Martin Roseveare
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Martin Roseveare's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:47 AM

Publicising this image does unfortunately make it easier for the nighthawks of course but given that it is already in the public domain linking to it from here probably won't make much difference long term.

David Connolly's comment, March 21, 2013 4:31 AM
But as MArtin says... we must continue to share...!
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Rock Art in the Kimberley-(Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Rock Art in the Kimberley-(Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A new scientific study of rock art in the Kimberley aims to clarify the history of human settlement in Australia.

 

Throughout northern Australia there is rock art of the most breathtaking kind: animals and people and designs painted in vibrant ochre. So how long have Australians been painting like this? And what can the oldest paintings tells us about our forerunners, the very first Australians?

Dr June Ross is one of Australia's leading experts on rock art. She taught one of the few rock art courses in Australia, at the University of New England, and she's published extensively in the field. And she's involved in several different field work projects.

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Astronomical alignments were vital in Mesoamerica : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Astronomical alignments were vital in Mesoamerica : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A three year examination of astronomical alignments found in the buildings of Mesoamerican cities has demonstrated the basis of some pre-Columbian rituals.

Archaeologist Francisco Sánchez Nava, of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), together with archaeoastronomer Ivan Sprajc, from the Centre of Scientific Research of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, jointly developed the project “The Archaeo-astronomical Properties of Architecture and Urbanism in Mesoamerica”.

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Ancient merchant town to get new lease on life

Ancient merchant town to get new lease on life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A huge project to protect and develop an ancient merchant town in Central China is expected to start in October, a senior local official said.

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Kansas Archeology Training Program Field School 2013 - Kansas Historical Society

Kansas Archeology Training Program Field School 2013 - Kansas Historical Society | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Kansas Historical Society, Kansas Anthropological Association, Ellis County Historical Society, and Fort Hays State University Department of History and Department of Geosciences are teaming up to sponsor the 2013 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school, June 1-16, 2013.

The site of Billy Dixon’s trading post (14EL311) south of Hays in Ellis County has been selected for investigation. Components will include a block excavation of dugouts and other features, survey of a segment of the Smoky Hill Trail, an artifact processing lab, classes, and associated programs.

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Skeletons uncovered may have been early victims of the Black Death : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Skeletons uncovered may have been early victims of the Black Death : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working on the UK’s largest infrastructure project – Crossrail – have discovered a lost  burial ground in central London which may have been created as a result of the outbreak of plague in the 14th century.

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Syria's ancient city of Palmyra on brink of destruction

Syria's ancient city of Palmyra on brink of destruction | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As the Syrian crisis enters its third year, an end to the violence in the country is nowhere to be seen. The world has become accustomed to rising death tolls and reports of shelling and destruction. However, another threat looms in Syria, and this time it is targeting its cultural heritage.

 

Palmyra, one of the oldest cities in the country, has been subjected to intermittent shelling by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad.

The ruins of the city, which is one of UNESCO’s World Heritage sites, date back thousands of years. “Bombs and rockets come in all directions,” eyewitnesses said.

 

Assad forces have struck the Roman Temple of Bel – built in 43 A.C. – and damaged its northern wall, eyewitnesses said, adding portions and stones of the wall have been destroyed.

 

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Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit

Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavations for the Crossrail project in London reveal 13 bodies in a burial ground believed to date from the early days of the Black Death.
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Roman cockerel 'best find' in years

Roman cockerel 'best find' in years | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

restored Roman cockerel figurine is the best result from a Cirencester dig in decades, archaeologists have said.

 

The enamelled object, which dates back as far as AD100, was unearthed during a dig in 2011 at a Roman burial site in the town.

It has now returned from conservation work and finders Cotswold Archaeology said it "looks absolutely fantastic".

 

The 12.5cm bronze figure was discovered inside a child's grave and is thought to have been a message to the gods.

 

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MES AYNAK, Afghanistan moves to salvage ancient Buddhist city

MES AYNAK,  Afghanistan moves to salvage ancient Buddhist city | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

It had the potential to be another Afghanistan Buddha disaster, recalling the Taliban’s destruction of two ancient statues that had stood for centuries in this country’s west: A buried Buddhist city lost to time was about to be obliterated by what promised to be one of the largest copper mines in the world.

 

Now, however, thanks to delays in construction of the massive mine and a hefty influx of cash from the World Bank, the 1.5-square-mile Mes Aynak complex is an archaeological triumph – though bittersweet.


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/03/12/3281580/afghanistan-moves-to-salvage-ancient.html#storylink=cpy

 

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Heart disease stalked our ancestors new CT study shows : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Heart disease stalked our ancestors new CT study shows : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Researchers performing CT scans of 137 mummies from across four continents showed evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardened arteries, in one third of those examined, including those from ancient people believed to have healthier lifestyles than most of us have today.

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