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Astronomical alignments were vital in Mesoamerica : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Astronomical alignments were vital in Mesoamerica : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A three year examination of astronomical alignments found in the buildings of Mesoamerican cities has demonstrated the basis of some pre-Columbian rituals.

Archaeologist Francisco Sánchez Nava, of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), together with archaeoastronomer Ivan Sprajc, from the Centre of Scientific Research of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, jointly developed the project “The Archaeo-astronomical Properties of Architecture and Urbanism in Mesoamerica”.

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Ancient merchant town to get new lease on life

Ancient merchant town to get new lease on life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A huge project to protect and develop an ancient merchant town in Central China is expected to start in October, a senior local official said.

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Kansas Archeology Training Program Field School 2013 - Kansas Historical Society

Kansas Archeology Training Program Field School 2013 - Kansas Historical Society | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Kansas Historical Society, Kansas Anthropological Association, Ellis County Historical Society, and Fort Hays State University Department of History and Department of Geosciences are teaming up to sponsor the 2013 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school, June 1-16, 2013.

The site of Billy Dixon’s trading post (14EL311) south of Hays in Ellis County has been selected for investigation. Components will include a block excavation of dugouts and other features, survey of a segment of the Smoky Hill Trail, an artifact processing lab, classes, and associated programs.

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Skeletons uncovered may have been early victims of the Black Death : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Skeletons uncovered may have been early victims of the Black Death : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working on the UK’s largest infrastructure project – Crossrail – have discovered a lost  burial ground in central London which may have been created as a result of the outbreak of plague in the 14th century.

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Syria's ancient city of Palmyra on brink of destruction

Syria's ancient city of Palmyra on brink of destruction | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As the Syrian crisis enters its third year, an end to the violence in the country is nowhere to be seen. The world has become accustomed to rising death tolls and reports of shelling and destruction. However, another threat looms in Syria, and this time it is targeting its cultural heritage.

 

Palmyra, one of the oldest cities in the country, has been subjected to intermittent shelling by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad.

The ruins of the city, which is one of UNESCO’s World Heritage sites, date back thousands of years. “Bombs and rockets come in all directions,” eyewitnesses said.

 

Assad forces have struck the Roman Temple of Bel – built in 43 A.C. – and damaged its northern wall, eyewitnesses said, adding portions and stones of the wall have been destroyed.

 

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Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit

Rail project finds 'Black Death' pit | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavations for the Crossrail project in London reveal 13 bodies in a burial ground believed to date from the early days of the Black Death.
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Roman cockerel 'best find' in years

Roman cockerel 'best find' in years | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

restored Roman cockerel figurine is the best result from a Cirencester dig in decades, archaeologists have said.

 

The enamelled object, which dates back as far as AD100, was unearthed during a dig in 2011 at a Roman burial site in the town.

It has now returned from conservation work and finders Cotswold Archaeology said it "looks absolutely fantastic".

 

The 12.5cm bronze figure was discovered inside a child's grave and is thought to have been a message to the gods.

 

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MES AYNAK, Afghanistan moves to salvage ancient Buddhist city

MES AYNAK,  Afghanistan moves to salvage ancient Buddhist city | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

It had the potential to be another Afghanistan Buddha disaster, recalling the Taliban’s destruction of two ancient statues that had stood for centuries in this country’s west: A buried Buddhist city lost to time was about to be obliterated by what promised to be one of the largest copper mines in the world.

 

Now, however, thanks to delays in construction of the massive mine and a hefty influx of cash from the World Bank, the 1.5-square-mile Mes Aynak complex is an archaeological triumph – though bittersweet.


Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/03/12/3281580/afghanistan-moves-to-salvage-ancient.html#storylink=cpy

 

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Heart disease stalked our ancestors new CT study shows : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Heart disease stalked our ancestors new CT study shows : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Researchers performing CT scans of 137 mummies from across four continents showed evidence of atherosclerosis, or hardened arteries, in one third of those examined, including those from ancient people believed to have healthier lifestyles than most of us have today.

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Stone Pages Archaeo News: Police return smuggled Neolithic artefacts to Kosovo

Stone Pages Archaeo News: Police return smuggled Neolithic artefacts to Kosovo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Seven artefacts dating as far back as 4,000 BCE to the Neolithic period, and thought to belong to the Vinca, a prehistoric culture that traces back to 5,500 BCE in southern Europe, have been returned to Kosovo. They are believed to have been stolen during the 1998-99 Kosovo war, and were discovered by police in Germany in 2005.
     Authorities think they were meant for sale to private collectors. There was no registry for the items and it took investigators years to authenticate them and confirm their origin. They have been placed in Kosovo's Archeological Museum in the capital Pristina alongside the museum's only previous artefact, a similar terracotta figurine known as 'Goddess on the Throne', returned from Serbia through the mediation of the United Nations.
     Kosovo's ethnic Albanians fought a separatist war against Serbia in 1998-99 and Serbia relocated some 1,200 artefacts from Kosovo's museum to Belgrade during the 78-day NATO bombing campaign that eventually ended the conflict. Serbia rejects Kosovo's 2008 declaration of independence, and ownership of the artefacts is still hotly debated.

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Raymond McGee's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:43 PM

I found it intresting that these pieces were stolen and found by German police. Alot of important artefacts are placed in Kosovo's Archeological museum. 

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Are you related to Cleopatra? Or are genealogists fishing in the Nile? - Telegraph

Are you related to Cleopatra? Or are genealogists fishing in the Nile? - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Scientists are questioning the accuracy promised by DNA sampling used to trace generations of ancestors

 

this week leading scientists challenged the basis of the tests. The Sense About Science campaign group claimed that the practice is as questionable as astrology.

David Connolly's insight:

Go for it!

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7,000 BC: The dawn of cinema brought to life : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

7,000 BC: The dawn of cinema brought to life : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

 

 

• P • I • T • O • T • I • is a multimedia digital rock art exhibition in the South Lecture Room of Cambridge University’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (MAA), on display until March 23. This is the first time it has been on display in the UK.

It brings some of the earliest human figures in European rock art to life with interactive graphics, 3D printing and video games; exploring the potential links between the world of archaeology and the world of film, digital humanities and computer vision.

David Connolly's insight:

Valcamonica - this is on my places to go...  and this short film is just so  cool!

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Egyptian “pyramid” boat threatened after sewage burst

Egyptian “pyramid” boat threatened after sewage burst | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
CAIRO: Egyptian antiquities officials have confirmed to Bikyanews.com that a pipe has burst inside the museum holding one of pyramid builder Khufu’s boat.
David Connolly's insight:

i suspect that it is not really threatened by a rising flood of sewage.   but...  pretty embarrassing 

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Digging deep to meet stone age ancestors - Entertainment

Digging deep to meet stone age ancestors - Entertainment | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
When asked to showcase the result of a two-week dig at Goldsborough, archaeologist Rachel Grahame holds up a brick of charred sandstone and several pieces of flint no bigger than a fingernail.
David Connolly's insight:

Showing that commercial archaeology and research can happen!

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Cultural idea of caveman’s healthy living a paleofantasy

Cultural idea of caveman’s healthy living a paleofantasy | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Popular misconceptions about evolution have led people to try protein-rich Paleo-diets, run barefoot and sleep around, as if the cave people had it right all along
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Trove of Irish Historical Artifacts in County Mayo

Trove of Irish Historical Artifacts in County Mayo | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An Irish historian planned to spend six weeks organizing Jackie Clarke’s collection of more than 100,000 items documenting Ireland’s struggle to free itself of English rule, but eight years later, she’s still at it.
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3200 year old sundial guides archaeologists into the past : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

3200 year old sundial guides archaeologists into the past : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

During the 2013 season of the Valley of the Kings Project carried out by University of Basel, Prof. Susanne Bickel’s team have found a number of exciting artefacts including what they suspect to be one of the oldest portable sundials in the area between tombs KV 29 and 61.

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600-year-old Chinese coin found on Kenyan island : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

600-year-old Chinese coin found on Kenyan island : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

joint expedition of scientists led by Chapurukha M. Kusimba of The Field Museum and Sloan R. Williams of the University of Illinois at Chicago has unearthed a 600-year-old Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda that shows trade existed between China and east Africa decades before European explorers set sail and changed the map of the world.

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Neanderthal big eyes 'caused demise'

Neanderthal big eyes 'caused demise' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A study of Neanderthal skulls suggests that they became extinct because they had larger eyes than our species.
David Connolly's insight:

hmmm  this calls for a more detailed look at the research...  this seems an over simplification

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1,200-year-old Egyptian text describes a shape-shifting Jesus

1,200-year-old Egyptian text describes a shape-shifting Jesus | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
By Owen JarusLiveScience A newly deciphered Egyptian text, dating back almost 1,200 years, tells part of the crucifixion story of Jesus with apocryphal plot twists, some of which have never been seen before.
David Connolly's insight:

You have to love this version

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Kyle Kunkel O'Connor's curator insight, March 14, 2013 12:31 PM

new views on religion, interesting topis, religion, alternative history

 

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Human Ancestors Were Fashion Conscious - ScienceNOW

Human Ancestors Were Fashion Conscious - ScienceNOW | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The 2013 Academy Awards were, as always, as much about making appearances as about making films, as red carpet watchers noted fashion trends and faux pas. Both Jessica Chastain and Naomi Watts wore Armani, although fortunately not the same dress. And Best Supporting Actress Anne Hathaway switched from Valentino to a controversial pale pink Prada at the last minute because her original dress looked too much like someone else's. Of course, no actress would be caught dead wearing the same style 2 years in a row. A new study of ancient beaded jewelry from a South African cave finds that ancient humans were no different, avoiding outdated styles as early as 75,000 years ago.

Personal ornaments, often in the form of beads worn as necklaces or bracelets, are considered by archaeologists as a key sign of sophisticated symbolic behavior, communicating either membership in a group or individual identity. Such ornaments are ubiquitous in so-called Upper Paleolithic sites in Europe beginning about 40,000 years ago, where they were made from many different materials—animal and human teeth, bone and ivory, stone, and mollusk shells—and often varied widely among regions and sites.

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Ancient settlement discovered in Azerbaijan

Ancient settlement discovered in Azerbaijan | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Baku. Kamala Guliyeva – APA. The new settlement dated back to the Middle Bronze Age in the 3rd millennium BC has been found in Azerbaijan, Chief of Shaki-Gakh-Oghuz Archaeological Expedition of National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan (ANAS)...
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Kyle Kunkel O'Connor's curator insight, March 14, 2013 12:46 PM

civilization, history, archyology, anthropology

 

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Syria's priceless heritage under attack

Syria's priceless heritage under attack | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Historian Dan Snow writes that Syria's heritage is under attack - but when the war ends it will be the foundation on which a shredded national identity can be rebuilt.

 

In August 2012 fire tore through the heart of the Syrian city of Aleppo. One Western journalist said parts of it, including much of the medieval covered market, or souk, were "burned to smithereens".

 

Old Aleppo is a Unesco World Heritage site, recognised by the world as being internationally significant, a vital piece of humanity's shared past. Central Aleppo was a stunningly preserved medieval settlement, probably the finest example of its kind in the world.

 

It was as if parts of Stonehenge or the heart of Edinburgh had been wiped out. The fire was caused by the vicious fighting that has swept across Syria since a civil war started in 2011.

 

More than 50,000 people have been killed, thousands more injured, imprisoned and tortured, and millions made homeless or turned into refugees.

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Máttaráhkká: Mother Earth in Sami rock art : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Máttaráhkká: Mother Earth in Sami rock art : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Rock art in Fenno-Scandinavia can be divided into northern ‘hunter’s art’ and southern ‘farmer’s art’ styles. The distribution of rock art sites shows that ‘hunter’s art’ is found not only in the area where Sami people live today but also across a much more extensive area settled in earlier times by the ancestors of the Sami (Figure 2). The rock art takes various forms, including polished carvings, pecked engravings and paintings made with red ochre. Very often the rock art is found in sites that are associated with water, for example springs, waterfalls, rivers and close to the sea. The commonest motifs are zoomorphs (often elks and reindeer), boats, and anthropomorphs. In this article I will suggest that many of these rock art motifs are direct or indirect representations of the Mother Earth deity known to the Sami as Máttaráhkká.

David Connolly's insight:

Perfect for Mothers Day!

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