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Keynote: Open Archaeology

This paper will discuss some of the key themes raised in the recent 'World Archaeology' issue on the theme of Open Archaeology. It seems indisputable that there is now very real momentum towards greater willingness to share interpretations, data and software, but although technological developments are a major part of the story, the speaker will instead ask a series of questions about the social, cultural, political and economic ramifications of the Open Movement. Along the way he will reflect on the irony of publishing a collection of papers on Open archaeology in a conventional academic journal.

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Important to understand the direction of our heritage data. 

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Archaeology sites could lose 'sight' of security - The Hindu

Archaeology sites could lose 'sight' of security - The Hindu | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Hindu
Archaeology sites could lose 'sight' of security
The Hindu
Here is a piece of possible good news for thieves, vagabonds, sexual harassers and drunkards in the city.
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Beothuk facts?

Beothuk facts? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Many people in Newfoundland and Labrador believe they have a good understanding of the Beothuk. Yet there is still a great deal of misinformation about them. In this post, I'll try to  shed some li...
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Northern Ireland's own 'little Pompeii'

Northern Ireland's own 'little Pompeii' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Initial funding has been secured for an ambitious archaeological project to uncover a lost 17th century town in Northern Ireland

 

The site beside Dunluce Castle on the scenic Causeway Coast has been hailed as potentially the region's own "little Pompeii".

 

The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has now provided more than £300,000 for an excavation project and signalled the potential for a total package of £4 million.

The ruins of the castle have stood on the rocky coastal outcrop near Bushmills in north Antrim for centuries but it was only four years ago that archaeologists re-discovered a lost settlement beside the landmark.

 

Established in 1608 by the first Earl of Antrim, Randal MacDonnell, the town was destroyed in the uprising of 1641 and was eventually abandoned in 1680.

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Field Notes: Egyptologist Peter Lacovara takes us back to Abydos

Field Notes: Egyptologist Peter Lacovara takes us back to Abydos | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: Peter Lacovara, Senior Curator at Emory University's Carlos Museum, has worked on numerous expeditions in Egypt and published
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Dots on Maps

Dots on Maps | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
I have been using ArcGIS in my day-to-day work now for about 10 years. It is an amazing piece of software that is capable of so much that even after 10 years of use I am constantly learning somethi...
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Learn about the Labrador  gap.   what does it mean? 

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Scots' role in foreign power struggles

Scots' role in foreign power struggles | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In the 16th and 17th centuries thousands of Scots offered their fighting skills to foreign powers.

 

On Good Friday almost 500 years ago, Scots fought in a battle on Swedish soil in which their country was not involved. It was not an isolated case. Thousands of Scots mercenaries have played a part in power struggles overseas for many centuries.

 

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Colchester archaeology shares in £250,000 funding boost

Colchester archaeology shares in £250,000 funding boost | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ARTS bosses have handed Colchester & Ipswich Museum service £250,000 to help create an online historical museum.
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More boosts rather than cuts!

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Melting ice is a boon for archaeology - Grist Magazine

Melting ice is a boon for archaeology - Grist Magazine | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Grist Magazine
Melting ice is a boon for archaeology
Grist Magazine
As glaciers melt and recede, they are revealing archaeological treasures from the civilizations that came before ours.
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The Most Astounding Steam-Powered Vehicles in History

The Most Astounding Steam-Powered Vehicles in History | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
From the velocipede (pictured above) to buses, vehicles powered by steam were being beta-tested throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The results were pretty weird, and hint at a steam-powered ...
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Secret crypts found under cathedral

Secret crypts found under cathedral | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Restoration workers discover nine secret crypts hidden under the ruins of Coventry's bombed cathedral.

Work has been taking place after a crack appeared in part of the 14th Century ruins, in September 2011.

It was already known there were two crypts, which were last open to the public in the 1970s.

Dr Jonathan Foyle, the chief executive of the World Monuments Fund, which is overseeing the work, said it was like finding a "subterranean wonderland".

He said it was hoped the crypts could open to the public once they had been damp-proofed and cleared of rubble.

It is thought the crypts were originally used as special burial places for the nobility. Some contain human bones, which are thought to have been cleared from the cemetery which was built on for the new cathedral.

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New technology reveals El Tajin’s many hidden buildings : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

New technology reveals El Tajin’s many hidden buildings : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Three ball game courts, two terraced buildings and even a 1,000 year old residential area have all been revealed in the El Tajín archaeological zone in Veracruz, Mexico.

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) have used the latest remote sensing technology to investigate pre-Hispanic sites for the first in time in the country.

In addition to locating these remains that were hidden by vegetation, the use of this new technology will help determine the condition of the site as a whole.

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Mussolini’s ‘most secret’ bunker discovered beneath historic Roman structure

Mussolini’s ‘most secret’ bunker discovered beneath historic Roman structure | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Workers in Rome have stumbled across a top-secret bunker once belonging to former Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, hidden underneath the historic Palazzo Venezia.

The discovery is the 12th such bunker as is said to have been the “most secret” of the former strongman’s hideouts, according to the Italian publication La Stampa.

And in what has become a tradition of sorts, the bunker will soon go on display for the public to tour and document, as has been done with other recently discovered Mussolini bunkers. City officials plan to install lighting, a touchscreen system and an air siren, meant to simulate the sounds of an impending air raid.

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Cologne Archeological Dig Revives Ancient Jewish Heritage

Cologne Archeological Dig Revives Ancient Jewish Heritage | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An archaeological dig in western Germany has unearthed myriad traces of daily life in one of Europe's oldest and largest Jewish communities.
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Investigating Bronze Age stone ships on Gotland : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Investigating Bronze Age stone ships on Gotland : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In the middle of the Bronze Age, around 1000 BCE, the quantity of metal artefacts traded in the Baltic Sea region increased dramatically. Around that same time, a new type of monument appeared along the coasts; stones set on edge and arranged in the form of ships, built by the maritime culture involved in that same metal trade.

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Mystery unfolds: Monastery unearthed in Taxila valley – The Express Tribune

Mystery unfolds: Monastery unearthed in Taxila valley – The Express Tribune | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The monastery attracted so many students and monks from around greater India that its administration built an annex to house the seekers of enlightenment coming to meditate there, archaeologists at Quaid-e-Azam University (QAU) have discovered.

Another notable finding was that the main compound of the monastery, located in present-day Badal Pur, is at least 300 years older than archaeologists previously estimated. The main compound, which consists of 55 “monk cells”, was excavated between 2005 and 2012.

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Chumash burial site uncovered during Los Osos sewer

Chumash burial site uncovered during Los Osos sewer | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
For the first time, work on the Los Osos sewer project has uncovered a Chumash burial site.
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For the first time, work on the Los Osos sewer project has uncovered a Chumash burial site.


Read more here: http://www.sanluisobispo.com/2013/03/23/2441831/chumash-burial-site-uncovered.html#storylink=rss#storylink=cpy
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Displaying the Famous Political Dead

Displaying the Famous Political Dead | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Preservation of a body is an interesting phenomenon, whether it be the evanescent embalming at a funeral home to prevent the body from decaying at the wake, or preservation for hundreds of years as is the case with Rosalia Lombardo in the Palermo catacombs. 

 

Embalming is a three-fold process of sanitation, presentation and presentation. While the process has ancient roots and is found throughout the world, the modern technique was not possible until the Civil War, when the high number of bodies needing to be shipped over distances necessitated research and led to Dr. Thomas Holmes discovering a method of arterial preservation.

 

This was later improved in 1867, the August Wilhelm von Hofmann discovered formaldehyde. Primarily it involves the replacement of fluids and blood with chemicals to prevent putrefaction.

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Displaying the Famous Political Dead - Katy Meyers
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Neanderthal birthplace kills archaeology funding - The Local

Neanderthal birthplace kills archaeology funding - The Local | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The area which gave rise to the name Neanderthal will run out of public funding for archaeology in two years - North Rhine-Westphalia state government is phasing out its financial support.
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Not a good sign for the future.  

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Stratagems, Combat, and "Chemical Warfare" in the Siege Mines of Dura-Europos

Stratagems, Combat, and "Chemical Warfare" in the Siege Mines of Dura-Europos | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Sasanian Persian siege that destroyed Roman-held Dura-Europos, Syria, ca. 256 C.E. left some of the best evidence ever recovered for the nature and practices of ancient warfare. Perhaps the most dramatic of the archaeological deposits, excavated in the early 1930s, were those resulting from the mining duel around Tower 19 on the cityís western wall, during which at least 19 Roman soldiers and one Sasanian became entombed. Recent reanalysis of the excavation archive suggested that the mine evidence still held one unrecognized deadly secret: the Roman soldiers who perished there had not, as Robert du Mesnil du Buisson (the original excavator) believed, died by the sword or by fire but had been deliberately gassed by the Sasanian attackers. This article discusses the implications of this conclusion for our understanding of early Sasanian military capabilities and reviews the question of possible reexcavation in search of the casualties of Tower 19, whose remains were neither studied nor retained.

 

| American Journal of Archaeology

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Layers of time: Bronze Age to World War II : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Layers of time: Bronze Age to World War II : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Cambridge Archaeological Unit is leading an excavation at the site being developed for a new Cambridge University campus. The archaeologists have uncovered a remarkable landscape including five separate cemeteries, two funerary monuments, two Roman roads, Bronze Age ring-ditch ‘circles’ and thousands of finds including some 30 cremation urns, 25 skeletons, a spearhead and an array of brooches.
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King's Distant Relatives Want Reburial in York - Archaeology ...

King's Distant Relatives Want Reburial in York - Archaeology ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The members assert that their right to a private and family life was violated by the Ministry of Justice, which granted an archaeological investigation license to Leicester University. “Re-interment on the nearest consecrated ...
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Make it stop!!
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'Alfred the Great' bones exhumed to prevent theft - ITV News

Read 'Alfred the Great' bones exhumed to prevent theft latest on ITV News. All the UK news
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Research sheds light on ancient Egyptian port and ship graveyard : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Research sheds light on ancient Egyptian port and ship graveyard : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New research into Thonis-Heracleion, a sunken port-city that served as the gateway to Egypt in the first millennium BC, was examined at a recent international conference at the University of Oxford. The port city, situated 6.5 kilometres off today’s coastline, was one of the biggest commercial hubs in the Mediterranean before the founding of Alexandria.

The Oxford Centre for Maritime Archaeology at the University of Oxford is collaborating on the project with the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology (IEASM) in cooperation with Egypt’s Ministry of State for Antiquities.

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Photographing Dura-Europos, 1928–1937: An Archaeology of the Archive

Photographing Dura-Europos, 1928–1937: An Archaeology of the Archive | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Recent years have seen the emergence of scholarship on the history of archaeology and receptions of the classical past. Neither of these trends has fully engaged with the visual evidence, particularly that of photography, or with the material form of the archive itself. Using archival photographs taken at the site of Dura-Europos from 1928 to 1937, this article explores how the study of archaeological photographs and archaeological archives can contribute to our understanding of the history and epistemology of archaeology.

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