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'World's oldest rail tunnel' found

'World's oldest rail tunnel' found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Derbyshire have found what they believe is the world's oldest railway tunnel - with tests suggesting it dates from 1793.
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lost over 30 years ago  :)

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New Views of Ancient Culture Suggest Brutal Violence

New Views of Ancient Culture Suggest Brutal Violence | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Harappa have uncovered evidence of immigration but also great violence.

 

They lived in well-planned cities, made exquisite jewelry, and enjoyed the ancient world's best plumbing. But the people of the sophisticatedIndus civilization—which flourished four millennia ago in what is now Pakistan and western India—remain tantalizingly mysterious.


Unable to decipher theIndus script, archaeologists have pored over beads, slivers of pottery, andother artifacts for insights into one of the world's first city-building cultures.

 

Now scientists are turning to long-silent witnesses: human bones. In two new studies of skeletons from Indus cemeteries, researchers have found intriguing clues to the makeup of one city's population—and hints that the society there was not as peaceful as it has been portrayed.

 

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amazing find

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Robert T. Preston's curator insight, June 3, 2013 6:54 PM

Digs in Harrapa are showing it to be far more violent of a place than formerly believed.  Close inspections on skeletal remains from men, women and children show savage trauma, crushed bones and slices in the bones.  Not anything like the area was previously believed to be like.

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The lonely grave of Güllü Ayşa: Social memory and mortuary practices at Çatalhöyük

The lonely grave of Güllü Ayşa: Social memory and mortuary practices at Çatalhöyük | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
On the southeast slope of the main mound at Çatalhöyük, away from the bustle and dust of the excavation shelters, a …Continue reading »...

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Archaeologists make last ditch attempt to rescue remains of pre-historic tombs in RAK - The National

Archaeologists make last ditch attempt to rescue remains of pre-historic tombs in RAK  - The National | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists will comb through the 4,000-year-old tombs before road works in Ras Al Khaimah destroy some of them.

 

Archaeologists are in the final days of a three-month rescue excavation of the Qarn Al Harf tombs built by prehistoric date farmers.

Four megalithic, communal tombs are being excavated by archaeologists from the University of Durham in the UK and the Ras Al Khaimah Antiquities Department, ordered by the Ruler of RAK, Sheikh Saud bin Saqr.

Three tombs will be destroyed by the 32-kilometre RAK Ring Road that will bypass the city to connect the quarries and factories of the north coast with the 311 motorway.

The tombs date to the Wadi Suq period, from 2000 to 1600BC.

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good luck there.  

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Archaeology strains German-Turkish relations

Archaeology strains German-Turkish relations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An argument between Germany and Turkey about ancient treasures is escalating. Turkey wants its treasures back, but German archaeologists say Turkish sites are being exploited for tourism.

 

Archaeology often has a lot to do with politics - the current argument between Germany and Turkey is a prime example. Hermann Parzinger, head of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, last December accused Turkey of displaying "almost chauvinistic behavior." In reply, the Turkish culture minister Ömer Celik told German news magazine "Der Spiegel" that he demanded an apology, and he asked for five ancient objects to be returned that are currently shown in museums in Berlin. He claims they were taken out of Turkey illegally. Parzinger rejects any accusations of illegality for three of these objects: In December 2012, he said that the torso of the Fisherman of Aphrodisias, the sarcophagus from the Haci Ibrahim Veli tomb and a 13th-century prayer niche were all acquired legally.

But "legal" is a fluid concept in the world of archaeology. The export of ancient treasures from the Ottoman Empire has been prohibited by law since 1884. At the same time though, it wasn't unusual to share the treasures discovered in excavations with teams from abroad. Special permission was often given to take objects out of the country, and there was a flourishing black market. The issue is often less a matter of legality than of morality.

But it is clear that political confrontation and rigid demands don't help anybody, including Turkey. The habit of reclaiming archaeological finds could come back to haunt Istanbul if Lebanon decides to ask for the return of the famous sarcophagus of Alexander. It was taken to Istanbul's Archaeological Museum in 1887, during the time of the Ottoman Empire.

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Old Sana'a, an endangered UNESCO heritage site

Old Sana'a, an endangered UNESCO heritage site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

To see Sana'a’s Old City for the first time is like “a vision of a childhood dream world of fantasy castles,” a visitor once remarked, but official neglect and unruly construction are threatening to destroy that magic.

Yemen’s capital is one of the most ancient cities in the world, and entering its oldest quarter has been described “as perhaps the closest thing to time travel” we can experience.

Ancient “tower blocks,” some six stories high, some nine, look like gingerbread castles. With ground floors of black lava stone, their upper stories are of baked brick decorated with intricate geometric shapes and horizontal bands in gypsum whitewash.

Each quarter has a mosque, a hammam (Turkish bath) and a garden around which the houses were built.

In the past, water used for ablution in the mosque was then pooled to irrigate the gardens, used for growing vegetables, and waste was recycled to heat water in the hammams or for fertilizer.

That rich heritage is reflected in 103 mosques, some built more than a millennium ago, 14 hammams and more than 6,000 centuries-old houses, and the Old City was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986.

But preservationists are struggling against the ravages of the modern world. Randomly built concrete houses distort the Old City’s skyline, salt from the cement weakens its structure and the once-spacious gardens are disappearing.

David Connolly's insight:

Of that I can confirm...   having been lucky enough to have lived there...   it has the wow factor!    but so needs protection!

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If artifacts could talk...

If artifacts could talk... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In 2012, a school age child found a ground stone adze on the west side of Red Bay Harbour, contacted a member of the Provincial Archaeology Office, and turned in the artifact. By all accounts, the artifact is just a regular chipped and ground stone adze and is not culturally diagnostic. So it was not found in context and we don’t know who made it. Last week I was looking at the artifact and I was considering questions such as when was it made, who made it and who dropped it and I thought ‘If only you could talk’, we could learn so much. So I am left with a one sided conversation. I’m sure most archaeologists can relate to this scenario.
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Dam digs unearth archaeological finds dating millions of years - The Portugal News

Dam digs unearth archaeological finds dating millions of years - The Portugal News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeological works that have been going on for two years in the region of the Lower Sabor River in north-eastern Portugal have turned up unique finds dating back millions of years, Lusa News Agency reported.
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thats a lot of work ahead before the damn gets built

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Making of Europe unlocked by DNA

Making of Europe unlocked by DNA | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
DNA sequenced from nearly 40 ancient skeletons has shed light on the complex prehistoric events that created the present day European population.
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well written precis of the study

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Shaman petroglyph recorded in Veracruz : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Shaman petroglyph recorded in Veracruz : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A set of petroglyphs including one which depicts a priest or “wise man” has been recorded by archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). These rock cut images were found on the slopes of Cerro del Bonnet in the Mexican state of Veracruz.

The pecked stone petroglyphs are thought to be about 500 years old and were discovered in January 2013 by members of the local farming community.

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Tools down for Time Team: Raksha Dave on the end of an era and her new adventure

Tools down for Time Team: Raksha Dave on the end of an era and her new adventure | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
DV Field School Manager and Time Team archaeologist Raksha Dave advises us all to switch off the remote and make our own adventure... It’s the end of an era, a watershed, a seminal moment for TV archaeology: Time Team has finally ended.
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nice one....   lets take the advice

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The mafia left Naples in ruins. Can they do the same to Pompeii?

The mafia left Naples in ruins. Can they do the same to Pompeii? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Having been buried under ash from Mount Vesuvius almost 2000 years ago, the Roman city of Pompeii managed to rise again – becoming one of the world’s most famous historic sites and tourist attractions.

But over the past decade – under the weight of 2.3 million trampling visitors’ feet every year – it has fallen into woeful neglect and is in urgent need of restoration.

This was amply demonstrated in 2010 with the collapse of the site’s House of the Gladiators.

 

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not a good look

 

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Carolinas’ rocks hold ancient messages | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com

Carolinas’ rocks hold ancient messages | Science/Technology | NewsObserver.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Not as elaborate, well-preserved or easily interpreted as those in France and the Southwest, there are nevertheless more than 100 sites in North and South Carolina where archaeologists think prehistoric people expressed themselves with the tools at...
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Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum

Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference.

But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution -- and their life's work -- was attacked.

"It's sort of a monument to scientific illiteracy, isn't it?" said Jerry Lipps, professor of geology, paleontology and evolution at University of California, Berkeley.

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Steven Mallach's curator insight, May 1, 2013 7:18 AM

For me, this would be better than Disneyland.

 

Belief in a divine power is great, it gets many people through difficult days, but wake up and smell the fossil record.

 

There is nothing more entertaining than people so completely, so utterly, so mind bendingly wrong and yet still so convinced that they have the answer.

 

Was reading about kids in Texas (if I'm not mistaken) who were fed this drivel as part of their curriculum, without parents signing off on the idea.

 

"If anyone says that dinosaurs were on Earth more than 4000 years ago what do you say to them?

 

"WERE YOU THERE?"

 

This was apprently a test question. "Were you there?" was the corect answer.

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Hauntingly Beautiful Abandoned Europe: Meet Urbex Master Andre Govia

Hauntingly Beautiful Abandoned Europe: Meet Urbex Master Andre Govia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Urbex guru Andre Govia has an uncanny ability to take the most amazingly beautiful photos of creepy abandoned places. If you like abandoned, creepy, spooky, scary or haunted, then you could disappe...

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Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, May 25, 2013 1:50 PM

A manual typewriter coated with dust. What kind of story would it type?  Perhaps it would tell us who left his umbrella next to the clock on the old wooden desk under the stairs?    

 

Follow Andre Govia's camera as it uncovers the stories in some of the most amazing abandoned places.  A poet of the eye.

Jesse Alexander's curator insight, June 23, 2013 4:58 PM

add your insight...

 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 14, 2014 9:30 PM

Remarkably haunting.Andre Govia has traveled through Europe on a Urbexing tour (Urbexing The present participle verb form of urbex. Urbexing is the act of exploring urban areas that are generally off-limits to regular civilians.)The images in this collection are breathtaking and thought provoking to say the least.I enjoyed looking at all of them in detail. My favorites in this collection were the images that were not altered. Europe has so much history and these pictures bring this to light.Amazing architecture combined with the element of decay create a mysterious and emotional set of images.

 

In this modern age where everything that is "new" has more value it is nice to see the past being viewed for the beauty that it offers.

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Rally Against Looting Ancient Egyptian Necropolis

Rally Against Looting Ancient Egyptian Necropolis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Egyptian youths protested Monday at a key historic site, demanding that authorities put a stop to looting and construction that threatens one of the nation's oldest pyramids and burial grounds.

 

Illegal construction of a new cemetery has been going on for months in part of a 4,500-year-old pharaonic necropolis. The expansion has encroached on the largely unexplored complex of Dahshour, where Pharaoh Sneferu experimented with the first smooth-sided pyramids that his son Khufu, also known as Cheops, employed at the more famous Giza Plateau nearby, when he built the Great Pyramid.

 

Authorities issued an order in January to remove the construction equipment, instructing the Interior Ministry's police to implement it, but no action has been taken.

 

Also, a security vacuum that followed Egypt's 2011 popular uprising has encouraged looters to step up their illegal digs, clashing with guards at the site.

On Monday, dozens of young protesters at the site about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of Cairo held up a sign that read: "God does not bless a nation that gives up its heritage.

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Knapping child’s play : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Knapping child’s play : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Where arrowheads, axes and other completed tools have receive much of the attention by lithics specialists, archaeologist Sigrid Alraek Dugstad from the University of Stavanger has concentrated on the debris, unfinished or discarded products. In her article ‘Early child caught knapping: A novice early Mesolithic flint knapper in southwestern Norway,’ she overturns the hierarchy of artefacts from the Mesolithic period.

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Mapping medieval monastic wetland management : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Mapping medieval monastic wetland management : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Understanding the landscape of the past relies upon more than just the study of data from a single information source. A team of scientists from Ghent University have taken a novel approach that combines the latest geophysical techniques, landscape and soil analysis and limited archaeological excavation to help unravel a more complete picture of human landscape interactions.

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Val Dufeu's curator insight, June 9, 2013 6:25 AM

A great multi-disciplinary project

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The black art of grave robbing

The black art of grave robbing | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Aboriginal rock art expert Grahame Walsh is accused of taking a secret to his grave.

 

The late rock art expert and former Queensland ranger was the subject of widespread acclaim for his recording of tens of thousands of Australia's most remote and unique Aboriginal cave paintings

 

With his trademark tattered Akubra hat, Walsh cut an Indiana Jones style figure trekking through some of the nation's most remote terrain mostly in Western Australia's rugged Kimberley escarpment country where he would camp for months hunting down, photographing and recording rare Aboriginal paintings such as the delicate Gwion Gwion figures or the eerie big-eyed Wandjina images.

 

The Bidjara people allege that in 2007, Walsh had been in possession of the remains of up to 25 ancient Aboriginal bodies which have since gone missing.-black-art-of-grave-robbing-20130315-2g61t.html#ixzz2Rk1JyjtE
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Researchers question origin theories of Maya civilisation : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Researchers question origin theories of Maya civilisation : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Maya civilisation is well-known for its elaborate temples, sophisticated writing system, and mathematical and astronomical developments, yet the civilisation’s origins remain something of a mystery.

A new University of Arizona study to be published in the journal Science challenges the two prevailing theories on how the ancient civilisation began, suggesting its origins are more complex than previously thought.

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Stonehenge and Durrington Walls - a new alignment?

Stonehenge and Durrington Walls - a new alignment? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

After downloading Google Earth 7.2 and experimenting with the improved star-field, the following accidental discovery was made:

A little before the summer solstice sunrise at Stonehenge, the Milky Way aligns along the Avenue at Durrington Walls beautifully. In a charming reversal, a little after the midsummer solstice sunset at Durrington Walls, the Milky Way aligns along the Avenue at Stonehenge equally well (see images 1 & 2 - larger versions can be downloaded here and here).

David Connolly's insight:

now what do you make of this!

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A history of the UAE set in stone at the Sharjah Archaeology Museum - The National

A history of the UAE set in stone at the Sharjah Archaeology Museum - The National | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

 

A piece of head stone discovered in Mleiha and dating to 150BC is inscribed with the south Arabian letters 'q, b, r', which translates to 'a grave' in Arabic. Another small stone from Mleiha dating to 100AD bears the Arabic letters, 'shams', or sun, second line has the letters 'dha, ba' and the third has a carved 'noon' or n letter, giving an insight into the language of the area.

Then there are objects frozen in time that leave a lasting impression, like those found inside a large subterranean tomb in Dibba dating to 1st Century. Alongside skeletal remains were found many personal objects, such as glass flasks, ceramics, jewellery and two beautiful ivory combs, one of which was still gripped by in death by the fingers of the person who was once used it while alive.

 

 

David Connolly's insight:

Even better... I found some of these  :)

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Giza Secret Revealed: How 10,000 Pyramid Builders Got Fed

Giza Secret Revealed: How 10,000 Pyramid Builders Got Fed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The builders of the famous Giza pyramids in Egypt feasted on food from a massive catering-type operation, the remains of which scientists have discovered at a workers' town near the pyramids.

The workers' town is located about 1,300 feet (400 meters) south of the Sphinx, and was used to house workers building the pyramid of pharaoh Menkaure, the third and last pyramid on the Giza plateau. The site is also known by its Arabic name, Heit el-Ghurab, and is sometimes called "the Lost City of the Pyramid Builders."

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Lynchburg project seeks to find, ID unmarked Confederate graves in historic city cemetery

LYNCHBURG, Va. — Archaeologists are working to find and identify more than four dozen unmarked graves of Confederate soldiers in Lynchburg’s historic Old City Cemetery.
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Good luck to them all.

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Space Archaeologists Call for Preserving Off-Earth Artifacts

Space Archaeologists Call for Preserving Off-Earth Artifacts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When it comes to preserving history, a group of archaeologists and historians are hoping to boldly go where no archaeologist has gone before.

Researchers are increasingly urging humanity to protect off-Earth cultural resources. That may well mean preserving NASA's Apollo landing sites on the moon as national historic landmarks, regarding far-flung spacecraft as mobile artifacts and even working to preserve some pieces of space junk.

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Marilee Ritchie Hird's comment, April 23, 2013 9:56 AM
This seems like a bit much to me.