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Necropolis bioarchaeology at Roman Sanisera : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Necropolis bioarchaeology at Roman Sanisera : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Cape of Cavalleria on the northern coast of Menorca provides a natural shelter for the port of Sanitja from the northern and northeastern winds. This natural port was first occupied as a military camp during the Roman conquest of the Balearic Islands by General Metelus between 123 and 121 BCE, and the harbour settlement grew over the following centuries.

In 1996 the formal study of this area began, revealing one of the most important archaeological sites on the island of Menorca. The initial work between 1996 and 2008, revealed that the military camp had an unexpectedly long occupation of almost 70 years, until it was abandoned around 45 BCE. At this point, the veteran soldiers, merchants and locals started living in a ramshackle settlement that developed slowly into a new city called Sanisera, mentioned first by Pliny the Elder in the 1st century CE.

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An ancient settlement in north Qatar

An ancient settlement in north Qatar | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
On a deserted stretch of coastline in the far north-west of Qatar are the ancient ruins of a large fortress.
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The biggest wonder about the Hanging Gardens of Babylon? They weren’t in Babylon

The biggest wonder about the Hanging Gardens of Babylon? They weren’t in Babylon | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

he Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the  Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, weren’t in Babylon at all – but were instead located 300 miles to the north in Babylon’s greatest rival Nineveh, according to a leading Oxford-based historian.

After more than 20 years of research, Dr. Stephanie Dalley, of Oxford University’s Oriental Institute, has finally pieced together enough evidence to prove beyond reasonable doubt that the famed gardens were built in Nineveh by the great Assyrian ruler Sennacherib  - and not,  as historians have always thought, by King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon.

Dr. Dalley first publicly proposed her idea that Nineveh, not Babylon, was the site of the gardens back in 1992, when her claim was reported in The Independent – but it’s taken a further two decades to find enough evidence to prove it.

Detective work  by Dr. Dalley  – due to be published  as a book by Oxford University Press later this month – has yielded four key pieces of evidence.

 

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Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:51 AM
Maybe in few years we're going to learn that Khufu's Pyramid is not in Gizeh ?
David Connolly's comment, May 6, 2013 9:20 AM
lol! and London is actually located in Paris :)
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 6, 2013 3:02 PM
Exactly ! That's why I have to write in english !
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Roman gold found in treasure hoard

Roman gold found in treasure hoard | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A hoard of Roman gold and silver coins, described by an expert as a "lucky" find and likened to the Hoxne treasure, are found in Norfolk.

"As this horde finishes with the coins of Tiberius, it could date to either the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43, or possibly the Boudicca revolt in AD 61, it's difficult to say either way," said Mr Marsden.

"It's likely it was buried to have come from a Roman soldier or perhaps settlers trying to hide their hoard from the Iceni invasion. We tend not to see many of this type of Roman silver coins, so to have 59 is really quite unusual.

"Coins this size have a spending power of about £30-£40 in today's money - it'd certain buy a solider a few jugs of wine."

A medieval gold pendant found in Foxley and a medieval silver seal matrix unearthed in Sustead, near Cromer, were also declared treasure.

Erica Darch, from Norfolk Historic Environment Services and the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS), said: "It's important to record all archaeological finds, treasure or not, because when studied as an assemblage they add enormously to our understanding of Norfolk's past.

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Importance of the humble fig to humankind : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Importance of the humble fig to humankind : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Figs and fig trees are familiar to a wide cross-section of human society, both as a common food and for their spiritual importance. What is less well understood is the global nature of this association between figs and humans, which is maintained across species, continents and societies.

This relationship is explored by David Wilson of Ecology and Heritage Partners and Anna Wilson from the University of Melbourne in Australia in a paper published in the Springer journal Human Ecology. Using examples from around the world, the authors show that figs are a vital resource for humans, no matter which species are present in a region.

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Rune stone rediscovered after 300 years : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Rune stone rediscovered after 300 years : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A nearly 1,000 year-old rune stone has been rediscovered at Bogesunds brygga west of Vaxholm in Sweden.

The rune stone was found during an excursion which was part of a course in landscape archaeology at Stockholm University. The stone has previously been known, but had been missing since the 17th century.

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Deanna Dahlsad's curator insight, May 3, 2013 4:14 PM

Hey, archaeologists of the 17th century, this is why we can't have nice things.

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Man behind pyramid find in Bosnia, holds lecture at Katara

Man behind pyramid find in Bosnia, holds lecture at Katara | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Renowned Bosnian-American archaeologist Sam Semir Osmanagich, famous for his discovery of the Bosnian pyramids, shared his experience and views in a lecture at Katara on Tuesday.
David Connolly's insight:

This is a disturbing article from Qatar ( on so many levels - apart from calling himself an archaeologist and discoverer of the pyramids ( what pyramids?) - a country investing heavily in real science, but now it seems Semir Osmanagich has come to town:

Apart from the usual nonsense and unsupported guff about cut granite blocks forming the pyramid and dates of 28400 years old for he construction of the site..etc. the following quote makes me shiver with apprehension... when you hear people saying like we are not descended from monkeys, I am reminded of the anti Darwin rhetoric - and the misconception that we are descended from monkeys - rather monkeys being relatives on the evolutionary tree. ... read on:

"According to Osmanagich, the problem with this discovery is that it debunks what has been taught in schools across the world. “When you show the world that this is false information and have evidence provided by a scientific community, such as carbon dating, material testing and excavations, to prove that it is actually a structure built by intelligent hands at least 24,800 years ago, people will begin to ask question like, ‘who were these built by? Why and how were they built?’. You’re going against official history, that says we are from monkeys and no matter how bad of a world we might live in on any level, we are the best of the best,” he said."

We also have a report that the site is a free energy generator. ... um! great!

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#172 Open Letter To Arrowhead Hunters

#172 Open Letter To Arrowhead Hunters | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Living in Nevada, there isn’t a week that goes by where I don’t hear someone that either has lived here for a significant portion of their life, or all their life, and about how many arrowheads they have in a bucket back home.
David Connolly's insight:

read it - share it

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Survival cannibalism took place at historic Jamestown : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Survival cannibalism took place at historic Jamestown : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Douglas Owsley, the division head for physical anthropology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, presented a forensic analysis of 17th-century human remains proving that survival cannibalism took place in historic Jamestown.

The findings answer a long-standing question among historians about the occurrence of cannibalism at Jamestown during the deadly winter of 1609–1610 known as the “starving time”—a period during which about 80 percent of the colonists died. The announcement was made with chief archaeologist William Kelso from the Jamestown Rediscovery Project at Preservation Virginia, and historian James Horn, vice president of research and historical interpretation at Colonial Williamsburg; each expert provided context about the discovery and the history of the site.

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Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum

Paleontologists brought to tears, laughter by Creation Museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

For a group of paleontologists, a tour of the Creation Museum seemed like a great tongue-in-cheek way to cap off a serious conference.

But while there were a few laughs and some clowning for the camera, most left more offended than amused by the frightening way in which evolution -- and their life's work -- was attacked.

"It's sort of a monument to scientific illiteracy, isn't it?" said Jerry Lipps, professor of geology, paleontology and evolution at University of California, Berkeley.

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Steven Mallach's curator insight, May 1, 2013 7:18 AM

For me, this would be better than Disneyland.

 

Belief in a divine power is great, it gets many people through difficult days, but wake up and smell the fossil record.

 

There is nothing more entertaining than people so completely, so utterly, so mind bendingly wrong and yet still so convinced that they have the answer.

 

Was reading about kids in Texas (if I'm not mistaken) who were fed this drivel as part of their curriculum, without parents signing off on the idea.

 

"If anyone says that dinosaurs were on Earth more than 4000 years ago what do you say to them?

 

"WERE YOU THERE?"

 

This was apprently a test question. "Were you there?" was the corect answer.

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Hauntingly Beautiful Abandoned Europe: Meet Urbex Master Andre Govia

Hauntingly Beautiful Abandoned Europe: Meet Urbex Master Andre Govia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Urbex guru Andre Govia has an uncanny ability to take the most amazingly beautiful photos of creepy abandoned places. If you like abandoned, creepy, spooky, scary or haunted, then you could disappe...

Via Larkworthy Antfarm, Laura Brown
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Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's curator insight, May 19, 2013 6:58 AM

wow! we love these photographs!

 

(with thanks to Laura Brown for pointing us in this direction)

Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, May 25, 2013 1:50 PM

A manual typewriter coated with dust. What kind of story would it type?  Perhaps it would tell us who left his umbrella next to the clock on the old wooden desk under the stairs?    

 

Follow Andre Govia's camera as it uncovers the stories in some of the most amazing abandoned places.  A poet of the eye.

Jesse Alexander's curator insight, June 23, 2013 4:58 PM

add your insight...

 

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Rally Against Looting Ancient Egyptian Necropolis

Rally Against Looting Ancient Egyptian Necropolis | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Egyptian youths protested Monday at a key historic site, demanding that authorities put a stop to looting and construction that threatens one of the nation's oldest pyramids and burial grounds.

 

Illegal construction of a new cemetery has been going on for months in part of a 4,500-year-old pharaonic necropolis. The expansion has encroached on the largely unexplored complex of Dahshour, where Pharaoh Sneferu experimented with the first smooth-sided pyramids that his son Khufu, also known as Cheops, employed at the more famous Giza Plateau nearby, when he built the Great Pyramid.

 

Authorities issued an order in January to remove the construction equipment, instructing the Interior Ministry's police to implement it, but no action has been taken.

 

Also, a security vacuum that followed Egypt's 2011 popular uprising has encouraged looters to step up their illegal digs, clashing with guards at the site.

On Monday, dozens of young protesters at the site about 40 kilometers (25 miles) south of Cairo held up a sign that read: "God does not bless a nation that gives up its heritage.

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Knapping child’s play : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Knapping child’s play : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Where arrowheads, axes and other completed tools have receive much of the attention by lithics specialists, archaeologist Sigrid Alraek Dugstad from the University of Stavanger has concentrated on the debris, unfinished or discarded products. In her article ‘Early child caught knapping: A novice early Mesolithic flint knapper in southwestern Norway,’ she overturns the hierarchy of artefacts from the Mesolithic period.

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Nanaimo-area First Nation outraged over damage to ancient rock carvings

Nanaimo-area First Nation outraged over damage to ancient rock carvings | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The chief of a Nanaimo-area First Nation says his community is livid at the discovery that crews hired by BC Hydro damaged an ancient and well-documented petroglyph site while working in the band’s territory last month.
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Making a history lesson out of dirt

Making a history lesson out of dirt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
If it were any other Saturday morning, Yamir White would probably be playing video games and not giving a thought to digging in the dirt near a school named after 19th century Pennsylvania Gov. George Wolf.

Via Sylvain Rotillon
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Rock art discovered in Aydın, Turkey

Rock art discovered in Aydın, Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Rock paintings dating back thousands of years ago have been found in the Aegean province of Aydın’s Çine district.

Similar rock paintings have previously been found in the Beşparmak Mountains, Bafa Lake and its environs, all of which are located in an area divided between Muğla’s Milas district and Aydın’s Koçarlı and Söke districts.

The paintings, which are believed to be 7,500 years old, were discovered as part of work conducted by Tekirdağ Namık Kemal University Archaeology Department Professor Neşe Atik initiated in 2000.
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LOCAL - 40,000 boxes of artifacts unearthed during Marmaray excavations locked in warehouse

LOCAL - 40,000 boxes of artifacts unearthed during Marmaray excavations locked in warehouse | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The archaeological excavations started in 2004 to accommodate the Marmaray Metro Project are still uncompleted, while about 40,000 boxes of historical findings are under serious threat as they have been locked in depots.

Though the 8,500-year-old historical artifacts from the Neolithic period drew worldwide interest, the excavations were stopped due to lack of funding.

About 40,000 boxes of artifacts found in the excavations, which were carried out with the sponsorship of the Transportation Ministry State Ports and Airports Authority (DLH), were locked in depots and sealed.

David Connolly's insight:

now they have not thought this one through have they!

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air Transport Command plane flies over the pyramids in Egypt.

air Transport Command plane flies over the pyramids in Egypt. | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An Air Transport Command plane flies over the pyramids in Egypt.Loaded with urgent war supplies and materials, this plane is one of a fleet flying shipments from the U.S. across the Atlantic and the continent of Africa to strategic battle zones. 1943. Exact Date Shot Unknown.  (Army)

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Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester : Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester : Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The University of Leicester archaeological unit that discovered King Richard III has spearheaded another dig and discovered a 1,700 year old Roman cemetery – under another car park in Leicester.

The find has revealed remains thought to date back to 300AD – and includes personal items such as hairpins, rings, belt buckles and remains of shoes.

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Images of Native Americans Revealed During Vatican Fresco Cleaning | Indian Country Today

Images of Native Americans Revealed During Vatican Fresco Cleaning | Indian Country Today | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Vatican may have discovered the first painted images of Native Americans in a fresco painted by Pinturicchio in the Borgia apartments...


Via musée du quai Branly
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(EN) - Glossary of Archaeology Terms | West Virginia Division of Culture and History

(EN) - Glossary of Archaeology Terms | West Virginia Division of Culture and History | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

"Glossary of Archaeology Terms - West Virginia Division of Culture and History"


Via Stefano KaliFire
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Useful  

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'World's oldest rail tunnel' found

'World's oldest rail tunnel' found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists in Derbyshire have found what they believe is the world's oldest railway tunnel - with tests suggesting it dates from 1793.
David Connolly's insight:

lost over 30 years ago  :)

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New Views of Ancient Culture Suggest Brutal Violence

New Views of Ancient Culture Suggest Brutal Violence | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Harappa have uncovered evidence of immigration but also great violence.

 

They lived in well-planned cities, made exquisite jewelry, and enjoyed the ancient world's best plumbing. But the people of the sophisticatedIndus civilization—which flourished four millennia ago in what is now Pakistan and western India—remain tantalizingly mysterious.


Unable to decipher theIndus script, archaeologists have pored over beads, slivers of pottery, andother artifacts for insights into one of the world's first city-building cultures.

 

Now scientists are turning to long-silent witnesses: human bones. In two new studies of skeletons from Indus cemeteries, researchers have found intriguing clues to the makeup of one city's population—and hints that the society there was not as peaceful as it has been portrayed.

 

David Connolly's insight:

amazing find

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Robert T. Preston's curator insight, June 3, 2013 6:54 PM

Digs in Harrapa are showing it to be far more violent of a place than formerly believed.  Close inspections on skeletal remains from men, women and children show savage trauma, crushed bones and slices in the bones.  Not anything like the area was previously believed to be like.

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The lonely grave of Güllü Ayşa: Social memory and mortuary practices at Çatalhöyük

The lonely grave of Güllü Ayşa: Social memory and mortuary practices at Çatalhöyük | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
On the southeast slope of the main mound at Çatalhöyük, away from the bustle and dust of the excavation shelters, a …Continue reading »...

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Archaeologists make last ditch attempt to rescue remains of pre-historic tombs in RAK - The National

Archaeologists make last ditch attempt to rescue remains of pre-historic tombs in RAK  - The National | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists will comb through the 4,000-year-old tombs before road works in Ras Al Khaimah destroy some of them.

 

Archaeologists are in the final days of a three-month rescue excavation of the Qarn Al Harf tombs built by prehistoric date farmers.

Four megalithic, communal tombs are being excavated by archaeologists from the University of Durham in the UK and the Ras Al Khaimah Antiquities Department, ordered by the Ruler of RAK, Sheikh Saud bin Saqr.

Three tombs will be destroyed by the 32-kilometre RAK Ring Road that will bypass the city to connect the quarries and factories of the north coast with the 311 motorway.

The tombs date to the Wadi Suq period, from 2000 to 1600BC.

David Connolly's insight:

good luck there.  

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