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Bergama area to become 3D Tablet sites in Turkey

Bergama area to become 3D Tablet sites in Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The four temples of Bergama ancient city, Zeus, Athena Altar, Red Yard and Asklepion will be transformed into a 3D platform and visitors will have a chance to see these ancient venues via their tablets and phones. The project, which was a part of the “History comes alive in 3d” has been launched with the support of Bergama Municipality and Bilkom. The project is being launched for the first time in Turkey.

Students from the architectural faculties of Dokuz Eylül, Gediz, Yaşar Universities took part in the project.
Bergama mayor Mehmet Gönenç and Bergama Chamber of Commerce held a press conference at Tonozlu Hall and said Bergama was a very important area of heritage for the world and for Turkey, which was why the project had been launched, as well as to contribute to the cultural values of the society.

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Elizabethans practised advanced craft technologies

Elizabethans practised advanced craft technologies | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Elizabethan craftsmen developed advanced manufacturing technology that could match that of the 21st century, claim researchers from Birmingham City University who are analysing a 400-year-old hoard of jewellery.

The team from Birmingham City University have analysed the craftwork behind the famous Cheapside Hoard – the world’s largest collection of Elizabethan and Jacobean jewellery discovered in a London cellar in 1912.

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Evidence of Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Saudi Arabia

Evidence of Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Saudi Arabia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Pre-Pottery Neolithic assemblages are best known from the fertile areas of the Mediterranean Levant  with most research focussed on the internal cultural dynamics of the ‘core area’ of what is known as the Fertile Crescent.



The development of the Neolithic in Southwest Asia has long been seen as a pivotal phase in human evolution and history;  a cultural and economic ‘revolution’, which fundamentally transformed the relationship between humans and their environments, paving the way for population explosion, a shift towards sedentary settlement and a profound change in technology.

However there has been (for a variety of reasons) less research devoted towards understanding the interactions between the core and peripheral regions....  until now!

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Proto-Canaanite script found on Pithos

Proto-Canaanite script found on Pithos | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Working near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, Hebrew University of Jerusalem archaeologist Dr. Eilat Mazar has unearthed the earliest alphabetical written text ever uncovered in the city.

The inscription is engraved on a large pithos, a neckless ceramic jar found with six others at the Ophel excavation site. According to Dr. Mazar, the inscription, in the Canaanite language, is the only one of its kind discovered in Jerusalem and an important addition to the city’s history.

Dated to the tenth century BCE, the artefact pre-dates by two hundred and fifty years the earliest known Hebrew inscription from Jerusalem, which is from the period of King Hezekiah at the end of the eighth century BCE.

A third-generation archaeologist working at the Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology, Dr. Mazar directs archaeological excavations on the summit of the City of David and at the southern wall of the Temple Mount.

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Ancient past vs. the BPA: Archaeological site at heart of a battle for Forks ... - Peninsula Daily

Ancient past vs. the BPA: Archaeological site at heart of a battle for Forks ... - Peninsula Daily | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Ancient past vs. the BPA: Archaeological site at heart of a battle for Forks ...
Peninsula Daily
The new tower would be taller, wider and require blasting to construct — which he feared would destroy the cave and its ancient art.
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D-REAMS can shed new light on the distant past

D-REAMS can shed new light on the distant past | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When did people first begin to express their feelings with flowers? It turns out that in prehistoric times, Mount Carmel residents in what today is northern Israel buried their dead on a literal bed of fragrant wild flowers, such as Judean sage, as well as blooming plants of the mint and figwort families.

Assuming they had the same positive associations with flowers that we do today, these ancient humans must have sought to ensure for the deceased a pleasant passage from the world of the living.

Judean sage. Image: Gideon Pisanty(Wikimedia Commons, used under a CC BY 3.0)

The discovery is the oldest known use of flowers in grave lining. According to radiocarbon dating performed by Dr. Elisabetta Boaretto at the Weizmann Institute of Science, the graves are 11,700 to 13,700 years old.

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Vietnam latest news | Treasure ahoy!

Vietnam latest news  | Treasure ahoy! | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Shipwreck discovered off the coast of Vietnam is oldest & least damaged ever found in the country http://t.co/AG5WeV49x1 marine archaeology
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Hillforts Atlas - School of Archaeology - University of Oxford

Hillforts Atlas - School of Archaeology - University of Oxford | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
RT @holland_tom: Crowd-sourcing, history & tramping hills: a project to map every hillfort in Britain & Ireland. http://t.co/ZVPhylWrFk Via…
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Transition to farming simultaneous across most of Fertile Crescent

Transition to farming simultaneous across most of Fertile Crescent | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A rich assemblage of fossils and artefacts in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains in Iran has revealed that the early inhabitants of the region began cultivating cereal grains for agriculture between 12,000 and 9,800 years ago.

The discovery implies that the transition from foraging to farming took place at roughly the same time across the entire Fertile Crescent, not in a single core area of the “cradle of civilization,” as previously thought.

Until recently, political pressures had limited excavations of archaeological sites in the eastern Fertile Crescent, or modern-day Iran, while findings to the west—at sites in Cyprus, Syria, Turkey and Iraq, for example—provided detailed clues to the origins of agriculture.

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:40 PM

the start of agriculture because of the fertile cresent in mesopotamia.

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Archaeologists unearth carved head of Roman god in ancient ...

Archaeologists unearth carved head of Roman god in ancient ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An 1800-year-old carved stone head of what is believed to be a Roman god has been unearthed in an ancient rubbish dump.
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Archaeo News Podcast 233

Archaeo News Podcast 233 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
In collaboration with Stonepages, British Archaeological Jobs Resource and Past HorizonsHeadlines

Rare Greek Neanderthal site found
Bahrain preserves its heritage
The origins of the spear

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White man's skull has Australians scratching heads

White man's skull has Australians scratching heads | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The centuries-old skull of a white man found in Australia is raising questions about whether Captain James Cook really was the first European to land on the country's east coast.

The skull was found in northern New South Wales in late 2011, and police initially prepared themselves for a gruesome murder investigation.

But scientific testing revealed that not only was it much older than expected, but possibly belonged to a white man born around 1650, well before Englishman Cook reached the eastern seaboard on the Endeavour in 1770.

"The DNA determined the skull was a male," Detective Sergeant John Williamson told The Daily Telegraph.

"And the anthropologist report states the skull is that of a Caucasoid aged anywhere from 28 to 65."

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Roman shrine found at nature reserve

Roman shrine found at nature reserve | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The team discovered a circular stone building, about 10.5m (34ft) wide, with decorated red and white painted walls.

They also found more than 200 Roman coins, pottery jars, part of a small bronze figurine and deposits of animal bone, probably from the ritual sacrifice of lambs and cattle.

A skeleton of a man, aged about 30, was buried in a grave in the centre of the shrine.

The archaeologists believe the shrine fell out of use in AD300.

 

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Oldest inland European fort found in Appalachians

Oldest inland European fort found in Appalachians | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The remains of the earliest European fort in the interior of what is now the continental United States have been discovered by a team of archaeologists, providing new insight into the start of the U.S. colonial era and the all-too-human reasons spoiling Spanish dreams of gold and glory.

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Revisiting History Through Objects, and a Long-Gone Game Show

Revisiting History Through Objects, and a Long-Gone Game Show | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Tracing history through objects is popular these days. Neil McGregor, the director of the British Museum, did it in 700 best-selling pages, and for the last couple of months, the New-York Historical Society has had an exhibition called “The Civil War in 50 Objects.”

Finding the 50 objects involves something of a scavenger hunt — they are on display in different places at the society, at 170 Central Park West, at West 77th Street. All 50 came from the society’s collection of about 1 million Civil War-era items, “a definitive record of slavery, secession, rebellion and reunion from the time these movements first roiled the city and the nation,” according to the Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer. He made the final decisions on which 50 objects were chosen, and which were not, after members of the museum’s staff had winnowed the possibilities to 75.

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Secrets of the Maya Otherworld

Ancient Maya believed that the rain god Chaak resided in caves and natural wells called cenotes. Maya farmers today in Mexico’s parched Yucatán still appeal to Chaak for the gift of rain. Meanwhile cenotes are giving archaeologists new insights into the sacred landscapes of the ancestral Maya.By Alma GuillermoprietoPhotograph by Paul Nicklen 

On the edge of a small cornfield near the ruined Maya city of Chichén Itzá, in the sparse shade of a tropical tree, a voice ricochets wildly up the mouth of a well. “¡Lo vi! ¡Lo vi!” the shout proclaims. “I saw it, I saw it!” “¡Sí, es verdad! Yes, it’s true!”

Leaning over the mouth of the well, underwater archaeologist Guillermo de Anda needs to make sure that this is what he has been longing to hear for so many months. “What is true, Arturo?” And his fellow archaeologist Arturo Montero, floating down at the bottom of the well, yells up again, “The zenith light! It really works! Get down here!” Then he whoops ecstatically.

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Mummy Mouths Open New Window On Ancient Climate

Mummy Mouths Open New Window On Ancient Climate | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Thousands of years after their owners' mouths stopped moving forever, the teeth of Egyptian mummies are telling scientists details about their civilization.

 

After analyzing the oxygen isotope levels in teeth recovered from the mummies, researchers at the Université de Lyon in France were able to determine that the ancient Egyptians endured an extensive period of drought.

 

Scientists have long attempted to link the Egyptian civilization's rise and fall to changes in climate, but they've been stymied by gaps in Nile River sediment records and historical accounts.

 

The mummy research, carried out over several years, involved drilling tiny holes in the teeth and bones of mummies housed at the Musée des Confluences de Lyon in France. Bone and enamel samples were then tested for two oxygen isotopes.

 

Changes in the isotopic ratios showed researchers that, for a time, the region was subjected to extremely dry conditions.

 

"Climate changes can be tracked through the oxygen isotope fractionations," the researchers wrote about their findings. "We show that [the oxygen isotope composition of meteoric waters] increased progressively from the Predynastic Period (∼5500 B.P.) to the Late Period (2550 B.P.), reflecting a decrease in the amount of precipitation at the sources of the Nile and/or an increase in temperature and evaporation."

Essentially, the teeth revealed a drought spanning thousands of years, resulting from a decrease in rain coupled with temperature increases.

 

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Roman mosaics discovered in Amasya

ARCHAEOLOGY - Roman mosaics discovered in Amasya | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

 

Archaeological excavations in the Black Sea province of Amasya have revealed 2,000-year-old mosaics with kilim-like motifs that are believed to date back from the Roman period.

The excavations are being carried out by the Amasya Museum Directorate in the Yavru village. Officials said that the mosaics with kilim motifs were “unique
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5 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About Ancient Civilizations

5 Ridiculous Lies You Believe About Ancient Civilizations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Much of what we know about ancient Greece and Rome tends to come from films and TV. And, well, much of what we know is plain wrong. (The Romans weren't as orgy crazed as you think.... for example. ). but what else?
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Roman times traces on Hierapolis' stage - Hurriyet Daily News

Roman times traces on Hierapolis' stage - Hurriyet Daily News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Hurriyet Daily News Roman times traces on Hierapolis' stage Hurriyet Daily News Hierapolis was first excavated by the German archaeologist Carl Humann in June and July 1887.
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Japan’s ancient Kofun culture explored with new technology

Japan’s ancient Kofun culture explored with new technology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Using powerful geographic information systems technology to accurately survey Japanese burial mounds or ‘Kofun’ built between the third to seventh centuries AD Professor Izumi Niiro an archaeologist at Okayama University in Japan, is exploring the’ topography’ of this culture from landscape, burial mound to artefact.

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Massacre dating back 2,300 years in the Crimea

Massacre dating back 2,300 years in the Crimea | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Chersonesos is an ancient city on the Crimean peninsula, which was founded by Greek colonists at the end of the 6th century BC in order to supply their homeland with grain and other strategic resources. The farmland in the Greek colonies was vital to the survival of the Greek city-states. Excavations by Aarhus archaeologists are exploring the development of the rural area from its peak until its decline.

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Why do we gesticulate?

Why do we gesticulate? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

If you rely on hand gestures to get your point across, you can thank fish for that! Scientists have found that the evolution of the control of speech and hand movements can be traced back to the same place in the brain, which could explain why we use hand gestures when we are speaking.

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PLOS ONE: Monitoring DNA Contamination in Handled vs. Directly Excavated Ancient Human Skeletal Remains

PLOS ONE: Monitoring DNA Contamination in Handled vs. Directly Excavated Ancient Human Skeletal Remains | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE:

 

Bones, teeth and hair are often the only physical evidence of human or animal presence at an archaeological site; they are also the most widely used sources of samples for ancient DNA (aDNA) analysis. Unfortunately, the DNA extracted from ancient samples, already scarce and highly degraded, is widely susceptible to exogenous contaminations that can affect the reliability of aDNA studies. We evaluated the molecular effects of sample handling on five human skeletons freshly excavated from a cemetery dated between the 11 to the 14th century. We collected specimens from several skeletal areas (teeth, ribs, femurs and ulnas) from each individual burial. We then divided the samples into two different sets: one labeled as “virgin samples” (i.e. samples that were taken by archaeologists under contamination-controlled conditions and then immediately sent to the laboratory for genetic analyses), and the second called “lab samples”(i.e. samples that were handled without any particular precautions and subject to normal washing, handling and measuring procedures in the osteological lab). Our results show that genetic profiles from “lab samples” are incomplete or ambiguous in the different skeletal areas while a different outcome is observed in the “virgin samples” set. Generally, all specimens from different skeletal areas in the exception of teeth present incongruent results between “lab” and “virgin” samples. Therefore teeth are less prone to contamination than the other skeletal areas we analyzed and may be considered a material of choice for classical aDNA studies. In addition, we showed that bones can also be a good candidate for human aDNA analysis if they come directly from the excavation site and are accompanied by a clear taphonomic history.

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Preserving the Face of Death: Death Masks

Preserving the Face of Death: Death Masks | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

 

Earlier this week, a historic artifact went up for auction at Bonhams, one of the world’s largest auctioneers in fine art and antiques. The piece had been estimated to sell for between £40,000-60,000, but ended up tripling that and finally being auctioned for  £169,250. The relic was a very personal item of the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte. It was a death mask made shortly after his demise on the island of St Helena on May 5th, 1821.

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