Archaeology News
Follow
Find
115.6K views | +2 today
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Experimental archaeologists complete Mesolithic hut

Experimental archaeologists complete Mesolithic hut | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists from University College Dublin have built a replica of a Mesolithic or Middle Stone Age house on the Belfield campus to better understand the process of creation and decay of this type of dwelling.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Cheese making in Neolithic Europe

Cheese making in Neolithic Europe | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New research has shown that dairy products were being processed in ceramic vessels pierced with numerous small holes, which were found on 7000 year old archaeological sites in Poland. Furthermore, the typology of the sieves, close in shape to modern cheese-strainers, provides compelling evidence that these specialised vessels have been used for cheese-making

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists hit the heart of the Theban Mycenaean Palace - Αρχαιολογία Online

Archaeologists hit the heart of the Theban Mycenaean Palace - Αρχαιολογία Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Season 2013 of the excavations taking place at the site of Kadmeia in Boeotian Thebes in central Greece has been completed bringing to light a series of impressive finds, including Mycenaean frescoes and a Late Antique mosaic, according to a local newspaper’s report.

As stated by “Boiotiki Ora” newspaper, one of the most impressive finds is the mosaic floor depicting marine landscape, which came to light in Antigonis Street. According to the Emeritus Head of the Ephorate and head of the excavation team dr Vassilis Aravantinos, the mosaic dates to the 4th century AD, sharing the same dating with similar mosaics located during the past in Pindarou Street and the Stamatis Plot.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Pictures of Deepest Wreck Currently Under Excavation in U.S. Waters

Pictures of Deepest Wreck Currently Under Excavation in U.S. Waters | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Warship, privateer, or passenger ship: The identities of three early 19th-century shipwrecks resting on the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (map) could be any number of things. But a group of researchers have spent the past week mapping and excavating these well-preserved finds in order to find out.

Their initial target, dubbed the "Monterey shipwreck," is a copper-clad sailing vessel that came to rest in 4,300 feet (1,330 meters) of water, making it the deepest wreck currently under investigation in U.S. waters, say experts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Stone coffin at Richard III site is opened to find.. ANOTHER mystery lead coffin

Stone coffin at Richard III site is opened to find.. ANOTHER mystery lead coffin | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Another mystery coffin has been found in a tomb next to Richard III's final resting place. Archaeologists discovered the 600-year-old casket yesterday morning.

 

We can't really be sure about what's happened to the grave over the past 600 years, but the lid of the coffin doesn't match the rest of it and there's some damage to the mortar so it looks like it might have been opened.'

 

The remains are encased in 5mm-thick lead. But the exposed feet, and some damage to the lead, suggest the corpse was dug up and reburied hundreds of years ago.

A crucifix embellished on the lid suggests religious valuables may have been placed in the coffin but removed some time later, according to lead diggers.

The team discovered the tomb containing the lead coffin last August but recovered it to concentrate on excavating Richard III.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Kiosque du monde : Océanie
Scoop.it!

Conservation of a Micronesian textile | Te Papa (Nouvelle Zealand)

Conservation of a Micronesian textile | Te Papa (Nouvelle Zealand) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Recently I completed a two year project to conserve a unique Micronesian textile.  It was such a pleasure to get acquainted with this very rare object with distinctive features–I was amazed to see that the colour changes in the patterned end of the...


Via musée du quai Branly
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeo News Podcast 234

Archaeo News Podcast 234 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
n collaboration with Stonepages, British Archaeological Jobs Resource and Past HorizonsHeadlines6,000 year old carved wooden post found in WalesRemains of pre-Ashokan shrines in NepalEarliest Middle Palaeolithic stone tools in IndiaVolunteers to map ancient hill forts‘New Stonehenge’ tourist attraction proposedThe world’s first calendar discovered in Scottish fieldPainted bronze excavated from central China tombsProtein analysis sheds new light on OetziMammoths may not have been hunted only for foodHarappan-era site bigger and older than Mohenjo-daro?Ancient rock art maps cosmological beliefPrehistoric flint mines discovered in PolandFarming in Iran 12,000 years ago3
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeology destroyed in Beşiktaş’s stadium in central Istanbul

Archaeology destroyed in Beşiktaş’s stadium in central Istanbul | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Historical ruins including a vaulted ceiling were intentionally destroyed yesterday with heavy construction equipment in İnönü Stadium, which is undergoing reconstruction, despite the Istanbul Archaeology Museums’ appointment of archaeologists to inspect the area.

The stadium is being demolished and a new one will be rebuilt 23 meters north of its current location.

However some historical ruins were demolished yesterday, despite the Istanbul Archaeology Museum’s previous notices that construction should stop if any artifacts were found.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Viking Jewelry Unearthed in Denmark

Viking Jewelry Unearthed in Denmark | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Several pieces of Viking jewelry, some of which contain gold, have been uncovered at a farm site in Denmark that dates as far back as 1,300 years.

Although the Vikings have a popular reputation as being raiders, they were also farmers, traders and explorers, and the craftsmanship seen in this jewelry demonstrates their artistic skills.

Archaeologists working with volunteers used metal detectors to find the jewelry in different spots throughout a farmstead on Zealand, the largest island in Denmark. The remains of the site, which is now called Vestervang, date from the late seventh to the early 11th centuries.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Monks in Egypt’s Lawless Sinai Hope to Preserve an Ancient Library

Monks in Egypt’s Lawless Sinai Hope to Preserve an Ancient Library | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Just as they have done for 17 centuries, the Greek Orthodox monks of St. Catherine’s Monastery in Egypt’s Sinai desert and the local Jabaliya Bedouins worked together to protect the monastery when the 2011 revolution thrust Egypt into a period of uncertainty. “There was a period in the early days of the Arab Spring when we had no idea what was going to happen,” says Father Justin, a monk who has lived at St. Catherine’s since 1996. Afraid they could be attacked by Islamic extremists or bandits in the relatively lawless expanse of desert, the 25 monks put the monastery’s most valuable manuscripts in the building’s storage room. Their Bedouin friends, who live at the base of St. Catherine’s in a town of the same name, allegedly took up their weapons and guarded the perimeter.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Oldest inland European fort found in Appalachians

Oldest inland European fort found in Appalachians | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The remains of the earliest European fort in the interior of what is now the continental United States have been discovered by a team of archaeologists, providing new insight into the start of the U.S. colonial era and the all-too-human reasons spoiling Spanish dreams of gold and glory.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Revisiting History Through Objects, and a Long-Gone Game Show

Revisiting History Through Objects, and a Long-Gone Game Show | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Tracing history through objects is popular these days. Neil McGregor, the director of the British Museum, did it in 700 best-selling pages, and for the last couple of months, the New-York Historical Society has had an exhibition called “The Civil War in 50 Objects.”

Finding the 50 objects involves something of a scavenger hunt — they are on display in different places at the society, at 170 Central Park West, at West 77th Street. All 50 came from the society’s collection of about 1 million Civil War-era items, “a definitive record of slavery, secession, rebellion and reunion from the time these movements first roiled the city and the nation,” according to the Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer. He made the final decisions on which 50 objects were chosen, and which were not, after members of the museum’s staff had winnowed the possibilities to 75.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Secrets of the Maya Otherworld

Ancient Maya believed that the rain god Chaak resided in caves and natural wells called cenotes. Maya farmers today in Mexico’s parched Yucatán still appeal to Chaak for the gift of rain. Meanwhile cenotes are giving archaeologists new insights into the sacred landscapes of the ancestral Maya.By Alma GuillermoprietoPhotograph by Paul Nicklen 

On the edge of a small cornfield near the ruined Maya city of Chichén Itzá, in the sparse shade of a tropical tree, a voice ricochets wildly up the mouth of a well. “¡Lo vi! ¡Lo vi!” the shout proclaims. “I saw it, I saw it!” “¡Sí, es verdad! Yes, it’s true!”

Leaning over the mouth of the well, underwater archaeologist Guillermo de Anda needs to make sure that this is what he has been longing to hear for so many months. “What is true, Arturo?” And his fellow archaeologist Arturo Montero, floating down at the bottom of the well, yells up again, “The zenith light! It really works! Get down here!” Then he whoops ecstatically.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Fresh but ancient beer - RN First Bite - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Fresh but ancient beer - RN First Bite - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
We sing an ancient hymn to a Sumerian goddess who gave archaeologists and micro brewers the signposts to recreating a 4000 year old beer. You can taste it next month. Straws supplied!

Ever tried making your own beer? Home brewing has been with us literally for millennia, and now the University of Chicago is getting in on the trend.

They've teamed up with a micro brewery to hold their first beer tasting next month, and while the brew will be fresh, the recipe certainly isn't, it comes from an ancient hymn to a Sumerian goddess on a 4,000 year old clay tablet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations in Diyarbakır unearth with Ilısu Project

ARCHAEOLOGY - Excavations in Diyarbakır unearth with Ilısu Project | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Thousands of artifacts have come to light through the “Ilısu Protection Excavation Project” conducted at the mounds located in the southeastern province of Diyarbakır and along the Ilısu River.

Some 19,800 artifacts, including 7,773 allocated for inventory and 12,027 allocated for research, have been uncovered in various mounds located near Diyarbakır’s Bismil district since the excavations first started in 2000.

Özcan Şimsek, the acting manager of the Diyarbakır Museum, said the excavations were not only important for the region but also for the world. “[The excavations] contribute heavily to the world archaeology. It should not be evaluated on a regional basis,” said Şimşek, adding that the Çayönü excavations were a keystone for world archaeology and that the Körtiktepe site was one of the oldest Neolithic centers in the world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Fault line at ancient city near Istanbul discovered

Fault line at ancient city near Istanbul discovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An archeological dig at the ancient city of Bathonea has unearthed more than potsherds, spear tips and skeletons: Researchers have found a fault line that could explain why the area has been abandoned every 300 years.

The excavation started in 2009 in Avcılar district's Lake Küçükçekmece area under the auspices of the Cabinet. Dr. Şengül Aydıngün from Kocaeli University is leading the project, which brings together 65 scientists from countries like Germany and Holland, 25 students from nine Turkish universities and more than 60 workers.

Aydıngün told reporters that the ancient city was found during a surface research project in Yarımburgaz, the oldest settlement in the Küçükçekmece basin. Historic documents and geographers' texts written several centuries ago revealed the existence of the ancient port 20 kilometers from Byzantium (now İstanbul), he said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeological sites should be introduced more to tourists in Iceland

Archaeological sites should be introduced more to tourists in Iceland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeological sites should be introduced more to tourists who visit Iceland, says the director of the Institute of Archaeology. Load could be taken off the most popular tourist attractions in Iceland by directing tourists more to archaeological sites

Most of the tourists who come to Iceland visit some of the many natural wonders, Icelander do not have any large buildings from the viking age, which could be visited. Archaeological sites store the history of Iceland, they are many but not very visible to tourists.

"In Iceland there are few places that are visible or known, maybe around 10 archaeological remains that travelers might consider to visit. Other remains or not known to many, but there are around 120 thousand archaeological remains in Iceland and this is therefore just a small fraction" said Adolf Fridriksson, director of the Institute of Archaeology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Spanish dig seeks prehistoric ancestors of Europeans

Spanish dig seeks prehistoric ancestors of Europeans | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Dozens of archaeologists in white hard-hats patiently sift the reddish-brown earth in the caves of Atapuerca, searching for remains a million years old.

From under strata spanning hundreds of millenia at this site in northern Spain, they unearth ancient mouse bones and the teeth of horses -- but what they most hope for is a sign of prehistoric humans that could write a new chapter in our evolution.

 

"The site covers a very long period of time, practically from when the first humans arrived in Europe, up to the present day," says Jose Maria Bermudez de Castro, one of the directors of the dig.

 

"If we add up all the sites found in the Sierra de Atapuerca, it covers a period from one and a half million years ago."

 

The site, near the city of Burgos, has been under excavation since 1978. In 2000 it was classed by UNESCO as a piece of world heritage.

"Most periods are represented here. That's what makes it a spectacular and unique site," Bermudez says.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Connolly from Shallow Geophysics
Scoop.it!

More results from last week | Sensing the Iron Age and Roman Past ...

More results from last week | Sensing the Iron Age and Roman Past ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Sensing the Iron Age and Roman Past: Geophysics and the Landscape of Hertfordshire. An adventure in Hertfordshire archaeology. Menu. Skip to content. Home · About · Calendar ...

Via Martin Roseveare
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Putin Strengthens Sanctions Against Archaeological Looters | News

Putin Strengthens Sanctions Against Archaeological Looters | News | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

President Vladimir Putin has formally approved a bill imposing tougher punishments on so-called "black archeologists" found guilty of stealing archaeological artifacts, a news report said Thursday.

 

The law increases the maximum jail sentence for those found guilty of illegally acquiring archaeological artifacts or avoiding handing them over to the state from five to six years and raises the maximum fine applicable from 500,000 to 7 million rubles ($15,000 to $215,000).

 

Despite this, the archaeologists also claimed that the law had come too late to save a considerable volume of material.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Vale Mike Morwood: archaeologist and finder of Homo floresiensis dies

Vale Mike Morwood: archaeologist and finder of Homo floresiensis dies | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

THE ARCHAEOLOGY COMMUNITY IS in mourning after losing Professor Mike Morwood, to cancer on Tuesday.

The New Zealand-born archaeologist became well-known worldwide when his research team discovered remains of the "Hobbit” species of human, Homo floresiensis, on Flores Island, Indonesia in 2004.

The significance of Morwood’s discovery has been compared to the discovery of the Neanderthals in the 19th century. It caused archaeologists and palaeoanthropologists to redefine what they thought they knew of human evolution.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeology: Thracian temple, sanctuary of Zeus and Hera found in Bulgaria’s Sredna Gora

Archaeology: Thracian temple, sanctuary of Zeus and Hera found in Bulgaria’s Sredna Gora | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists in Bulgaria have found a Thracian temple and a sanctuary of Zeus and Hera in Sredna Gora in the central part of the country.

 

The discovery was made at a dig in the Kozi Gramadi region near the village of Starosel in the Hissarya municipality by a team of archaeologists from the National History Museum led by Associate Professor Ivan Hristov, National History Museum director Bozhidar Dimitrov told Bulgarian media on July 22 2013.

 

The area where the large Thracian temple as well as the sanctuary of Zeus and Hera was found covers about 50 sq m.

The earliest use of the site is estimated to date from the early Iron Age, about the eighth to sixth centuries BCE

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Bergama area to become 3D Tablet sites in Turkey

Bergama area to become 3D Tablet sites in Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The four temples of Bergama ancient city, Zeus, Athena Altar, Red Yard and Asklepion will be transformed into a 3D platform and visitors will have a chance to see these ancient venues via their tablets and phones. The project, which was a part of the “History comes alive in 3d” has been launched with the support of Bergama Municipality and Bilkom. The project is being launched for the first time in Turkey.

Students from the architectural faculties of Dokuz Eylül, Gediz, Yaşar Universities took part in the project.
Bergama mayor Mehmet Gönenç and Bergama Chamber of Commerce held a press conference at Tonozlu Hall and said Bergama was a very important area of heritage for the world and for Turkey, which was why the project had been launched, as well as to contribute to the cultural values of the society.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Elizabethans practised advanced craft technologies

Elizabethans practised advanced craft technologies | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Elizabethan craftsmen developed advanced manufacturing technology that could match that of the 21st century, claim researchers from Birmingham City University who are analysing a 400-year-old hoard of jewellery.

The team from Birmingham City University have analysed the craftwork behind the famous Cheapside Hoard – the world’s largest collection of Elizabethan and Jacobean jewellery discovered in a London cellar in 1912.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Evidence of Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Saudi Arabia

Evidence of Pre-Pottery Neolithic in Saudi Arabia | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Pre-Pottery Neolithic assemblages are best known from the fertile areas of the Mediterranean Levant  with most research focussed on the internal cultural dynamics of the ‘core area’ of what is known as the Fertile Crescent.



The development of the Neolithic in Southwest Asia has long been seen as a pivotal phase in human evolution and history;  a cultural and economic ‘revolution’, which fundamentally transformed the relationship between humans and their environments, paving the way for population explosion, a shift towards sedentary settlement and a profound change in technology.

However there has been (for a variety of reasons) less research devoted towards understanding the interactions between the core and peripheral regions....  until now!

more...
No comment yet.