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A Blog on the ‘Magical Wonders of Archaeological Photography!!! | Ham Hill hillfort Archeology

A Blog on the ‘Magical Wonders of Archaeological Photography!!! | Ham Hill hillfort Archeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

nce upon a time… about half an hour ago actually, we (Paul, Stef and Ceris) witnessed the magical wonders of archaeological photography. Before our enlightening experience we knew less about cameras than a fish knows about a tropical tree. As we believe our pictures show we are now experts in the field of handling very expensive fancy cameras. We learnt there is more to life than pointing and clicking! There are ways of making your pictures actually look good! By (if you did not know before) simply altering your aperture and shutter speed! AMAZING!

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Dig reveals full extent of convicts' mass grave on Spike Island

Dig reveals full extent of convicts' mass grave on Spike Island | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have identified for the first time the full extent of a convicts’ mass grave on what was once a notorious concentration camp-style prison in Cork harbour.

 

The Spike Island Archaeological Project team, led by UCC archaeologist, Dr Barra Ó Donnabháin, has identified up to 250 previously unmarked burial plots, all dating from Famine times, within a walled cemetery area on Spike Island in Cork Harbour.

“We have always known that this area contained graves but we never knew how many,” Dr Ó Donnabháin said.

“There were about 11 headstones in this area, all dating from 1862, but which are not now in their original locations.

“Following geophysical analysis, we identified four or five rows with about 50 individual graves in each.”

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Ancient timber post on display at Beccles museum

Ancient timber post on display at Beccles museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A timber post used by people to help them across the boggy marshes of the Waveney Valley more than 2,000 years ago has gone on display at a local museum.

 

The timber posts were discovered by workmen undertaking a flood defence scheme close to the River Waveney at Beccles in 2006.

At first they were thought to be a relatively modern feature because they were so well preserved.

 

However, when archaeologists were called in they were able to confirm that the timbers were from a much earlier construction.

In further digs during 2007 and 2009, archaeologists from Birmingham University managed to remove the posts.

 

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Eye in sky is a view into Angus history

Eye in sky is a view into Angus history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

With one eye on recording Scotland’s ancient history and another on the ground, Dave Cowley is the Indiana Jones of the skies.

He is aerial survey projects manager with Royal Commission of Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) and he and his colleagues make 40 to 50 trips a year in a four-seater Cessna to record rare glimpses of the past.

And this hot, dry summer has provided the best conditions in years to see crop marks, which reveal evidence of ancient settlements long lost to modern agriculture methods.

While farmers rue the arid weather, Mr Cowley said now is the time to take to the air and survey “the glorious detail” of Roman forts and Iron Age camps “lost” since the 1970s.

 

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Miners desecrated Aboriginal site

Miners desecrated Aboriginal site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A mining company has been convicted of desecrating an Aboriginal site in Australia's Northern Territory.

Mining firm OM Manganese was found guilty on Friday - the first time a company has been successfully prosecuted in Australia for desecration of a sacred site.

The site is known as Two Women Sitting Down and is at Bootu Creek, north of Tennant Creek.

OM Manganese was fined A$150,000 ($134,000; £88,000).

Peter Toth, CEO of OM Holdings, which owns OM Manganese, said: "The company never intended to harm, damage or disrespect the sacred site."

"We sincerely regret the damage and the hurt caused and I unreservedly apologise to the site's custodians and traditional owners," he said.

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Inca child sacrifices were drunk, stoned for weeks before death - NBC News.com

Inca child sacrifices were drunk, stoned for weeks before death - NBC News.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Three Inca children found mummified atop a 20,000-foot volcano in South America consumed increasing amounts of coca leaf and corn beer for up to a year before they were sacrificed, according to a new study.

Sedation by the plant and alcohol combined with the frigid, high-altitude setting may explain how the children were killed. There is no evidence for direct violence, the researchers noted.

The coca leaf and corn beer consumption rises about six months before death and then skyrockets in the final weeks, especially for the eldest, a 13-year-old girl known as the "Ice Maiden."

"She was probably heavily sedated by the point at which she succumbs to death," Andrew Wilson, an archaeologist at the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom and the study's lead author, told NBC News.

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The village people? An early history of neighbourly disputes

The village people? An early history of neighbourly disputes | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Villages occupy a curious place in the British psyche. Symbols of an imaginary pre-industrial bliss villages seem to be widely regarded as sacred expressions of Britishness, a style of life that defines us as a people and which separates us from the rest of the world (Figure 1).
Conversely in Ireland villages are widely regarded as a foreign import, one of many aspects of life that are part of the legacy of unwelcome English interference.

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Archaeology: The milk revolution

Archaeology: The milk revolution | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
When a single genetic mutation first let ancient Europeans drink milk, it set the stage for a continental upheaval.

 

In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd artefacts. The people who had lived there around 7,000 years ago were among central Europe's first farmers, and they had left behind fragments of pottery dotted with tiny holes. It looked as though the coarse red clay had been baked while pierced with pieces of straw.

 

Looking back through the archaeological literature, Bogucki found other examples of ancient perforated pottery. “They were so unusual — people would almost always include them in publications,” says Bogucki, now at Princeton University in New Jersey. He had seen something similar at a friend's house that was used for straining cheese, so he speculated that the pottery might be connected with cheese-making. But he had no way to test his idea.

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Diocletian's palace in Croatia gets laser facelift

Diocletian's palace in Croatia gets laser facelift | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Conservators in Croatia have completed a ten-year project to remove more than 1,700 years of grime from the courtyard of the palace of the Roman Emperor Diocletian (AD244-311), in the coastal city of Split. Lasers were used as the primary method to clean the peristyle of the fourth-century imperial residence—an innovative technique that is normally reserved for cleaning individual sculptures or details of larger architectural elements, as opposed to whole structures. According to the architect Goran Niksic, who works for the city, this is the first time lasers have been used on this scale in Croatia to clean stone.

 

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Neolithic halls of the dead: an unique discovery

Neolithic halls of the dead: an unique discovery | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The remains of two large 6000-year-old halls, each buried within a prehistoric burial mound, have been discovered by archaeologists from The University of Manchester and Herefordshire Council. Uniquely, some of the burnt wood discovered at the site shows the character of the building’s structure above ground level.

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Ancient gold workers were crooks as well as craftsmen

Ancient gold workers were crooks as well as craftsmen | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As long as humans have lusted after shiny objects made of solid gold and silver, there have been scammers passing off plate as the real thing. They just used to be better at it.

Metal workers 2,000 years ago perfected precious metal plating techniques that modern methods can't touch, new research shows. The artisans covered knobby sculptures and flat coins with exquisitely thin layers of gold and silver. But the shiny finish wasn't just for show. Forgers and crooks likely coated cheap metal or wood in a gilded skin and sold the objects for a profit. Rather than flaking off or turning green, these master fakes withstood the ages.

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Severed head offering found in Aztec temple

Severed head offering found in Aztec temple | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) recently found the decapitated skull of an individual still lying in the offering bowl, dating back 500 years ago at the Tlatelolco temple site in Mexico City.

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Researchers seek link between mammoth bones and human artefacts

Researchers seek link between mammoth bones and human artefacts | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Kansas have been excavating for further clues that may tie the remains of a 15,500-year-old mammoth discovered in west-central Kansas with prehistoric human artefacts found nearby.

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Open Season on History

Open Season on History | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

FOR archaeologists like me, the Flowerdew Hundred Plantation near Williamsburg, Va., is our Woodstock, a sentimental spot where dozens of professionals earned their trowels. The farm’s incredible archaeological wealth ranges from 12,000-year-old Native American tools to a tree that shaded Union soldiers in June 1864.

 

Imagine our dismay, then, when a professed “relic hunter” from Texas named Larry Cissna sold some $60,000 in tickets for his Grand National Relic Shootout — an artifact-hunting competition — at Flowerdew Hundred. The shootout took place in early March, and participants walked away with 8,961 artifacts dating from the Civil War or before.

 

In Virginia, as in many states, relic hunting is illegal on public land, but legal on private land. Flowerdew, it turns out, belongs to the James C. Justice Companies, whose chairman, president and chief executive is James C. Justice II, whom Forbes ranks as the 882nd-wealthiest individual on the planet. (According to a spokesman, Mr. Justice was unaware of the “shootout.”)

Paid hunts like this have increased in the last 15 years, fueled by the market for Civil War relics, where a rare button can bring $5,000. Mr. Cissna has built a small empire using a Web site to organize hunts and sell advertising, a job that became easier in June when the Travel Channel began airing his reality show, “Dig Wars.”

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Meet Ancient Peru's own Grumpy Cat - Boing Boing

Meet Ancient Peru's own Grumpy Cat - Boing Boing | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Grumpy Cat, Shocked Cat, Lil Bub – their images are the currency of the web, passed between friends, family, and co-workers. When they go viral, funny cat pictures heal daily drudgery with a dose of furry, cuddly cheer. But, in terms of the reverence they receive, these cats are hardly the first of their kind. Ancient cultures had cat memes too, and archaeologists have their own term for them: feline motifs.

 

The word meme, itself a meme, feels ultra-modern, but was coined in the 1970s by Richard Dawkins to refer to any non-genetic unit of replicated information. And it would be chronocentric to presume this term applied only to the proverbial Caturdays following its contemporary articulation. Some archaeologists, known as evolutionary archaeologists, incorporate memetics into their explanations of cultural transmission and change. In their view, cultural evolution, or the speciation of different cultures, happens by selective forces acting on cultural memes, motifs and styles.

 

We can look back about two thousand years and see cat memes on objects made in the Americas before Columbus set boot here. In fact, the feline motif is a powerful point of acccess to Pre-Columbian cultures, as it was a common from the Mississippi to the tip of South America.

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The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project

The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project has been established between the Department of Archaeology, at the University of Sheffield and Rothwell Holy Trinity Church, Northamptonshire. The church houses one of only two known surviving and in situ medieval ossuaries in England.

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Ancient Feathered Shield Discovered in Peru Temple

Ancient Feathered Shield Discovered in Peru Temple | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The ritualistic shield, dating back some 1,300 years, was made by the Moche people and provides evidence that the Moche may have engaged in ritualized battles like gladiatorial combat.

 

Made by the Moche people, the rare artifact was found face down on a sloped surface that had been turned into a bench or altar at the site of Pañamarca.

 

Located near two ancient murals, one of which depicts a supernatural monster, the shield measures about 10 inches (25 centimeters) in diameter and has a base made of carefully woven basketry with a handle.

 

Its surface is covered with red-and-brown textiles along with about a dozen yellow feathers that were sewn on and appear to be from the body of a macaw.  The shield would have served a ritualistic rather than a practical use, and the placement of the shield on the bench or altar appears to have been the last act carried out before this space was sealed and a new, larger, temple built on top of it. [See Photos of the Shield & Ancient Murals]

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Downham Market’s railway heritage is preserved for future generations

Downham Market’s railway heritage is preserved for future generations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A stunning Victorian signal box in Downham has been safeguarded for future generations.

The town’s signal box is one of the five rare examples across the region to have been granted Grade II listed status last week.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has awarded listed status to 26 signal boxes across the country as part of a joint project between Network Rail and English Heritage to secure the nation’s railway signalling heritage.

Downham’s signal box was built in 1881 for the Great Eastern Railway Company but will soon be decommissioned as part of a 30-year modernisation project.

 

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Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar

Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Throughout the excavations at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney, numerous examples of Neolithic “art” have been uncovered. In fact, by 2010 around 80 “decorated” items had emerged from the site.

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:31 PM

Art found from excavations from the neolithic period. they held engrave picture from simple to more complexed.

Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:35 PM

All I've got to say is... Damn they had skill!

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:06 AM

This scoop is about the discovery of a Neolithic dated engraved stone at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney

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700 year old deer park discovered in Wales

700 year old deer park discovered in Wales | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Excavations led by Cardiff University archaeologists has helped to confirm the presence of a  royal 13th century deer park at Brynkir in Gwynedd, north Wales.

Likely constructed under the reign of Llywelyn the Great (1195–1240) who brought unity to Wales, the discovery was first made during the 2012 excavation season by a member of the team from Manchester Metropolitan University. The royal deer park dates to pre 1230 when Llywelyn moved his regional power centre elsewhere to Criccieth.

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Museum's 'ancient relics' exposed as a very modern swindle

Museum's 'ancient relics' exposed as a very modern swindle | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A Chinese museum has been forced to close after claims its 40,000-strong collection of supposedly ancient relics is almost entirely composed of fakes.

The Jibaozhai Museum in Jizhou, a city in the northern province of Hebei, opened in 2010, its 12 exhibition halls packed with apparently unique cultural gems.

But on Monday, the museum was shut after claims many of the exhibits were knock-offs bought for between 100 and 2000 yuan ($17.50 and $350).


A fake collection: Museum owner Wang Zonquan claimed "even the gods cannot tell whether the exhibits are fake or not". Photo: Getty Images

The museum's public humiliation began earlier this month when visiting Chinese writer Ma Boyong noticed a series of inexplicable discrepancies and posted his findings online.

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Among the most striking errors were artefacts engraved with writing stating they dated back more than 4000 years to the time of China's Yellow Emperor. But the Shanghai Daily said the writing was in simplified Chinese characters that only came into widespread use in the 20th century.

 
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Russian Envoy Urges Archaeology Dig in California

Russian Envoy Urges Archaeology Dig in California | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Russia’s ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, on Monday called for Russian and American youths to work together on an archaeological dig at Fort Ross, the 19th-century Russian settlement on the Pacific coast in California.

“We would be bringing together Russian and American youth to dig into Russian-American history – positive Russian-American history,” Kislyak told the inaugural session of the Fort Ross Dialogue, a discussion aimed at promoting greater US-Russian cooperation.

“I believe, and academics agree, that one could find a lot of artefacts at Fort Ross that would reflect the mixed community of Russians, native Alaskans and Kashaya who lived there in harmony,” Kislyak told RIA Novosti on the sidelines of the dialogue, which is being held in California’s wine country – where the Fort Ross Russians were the first to introduce grapes.

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Prehistoric Civilization Along China's Silk Road Discovered

Prehistoric Civilization Along China's Silk Road Discovered | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of a prehistoric civilization along the Silk Road in the Gansu province of northwestern China.

According to China's state-run Xinhua news agency, the discovered settlement dates back between 3,600 and 4,100 years ago. Among the findings are ancient coins, tools, crops, and a copper-smelting mill.

"The mill is the earliest of its kind that has been unearthed," Zhang Liangren, a professor at Northwest University in Xi'an, told Xinhua. "It will be of great help for studies of the history of Chinese craftsmanship."

 

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Traces of 'lost village' found

Traces of 'lost village' found | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Remains of what archaeologists believe is a "lost village" have been found beneath a Nottinghamshire town.

Experts say the presence of cobbled surfaces and Medieval pottery found in the Burgage area of Southwell suggests the presence a community that possibly dates from before the Norman conquest.

Archaeologist Matt Beresford said the work was ongoing and they hoped to find more conclusive evidence.

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Walrus Bones Found In Old London Burial Ground

Walrus Bones Found In Old London Burial Ground | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

During a recent excavation beneath the streets of London, archaeologists found a total of 1,500 human bodies, many buried hastily in a wave of epidemics that struck the quickly expanding city more than 150 years ago. 

In one coffin, archaeologists came across a grisly mix of bones from at least eight human bodies, many of them cut up and showing evidence of autopsy. But nine of the bone fragments were decidedly not human. They were walrus.

"It came as something of a shock," said Phil Emery, an archaeologist with a company called Ramboll UK, who led the excavation. The nine bone fragments came from a Pacific walrus that was likely 13 feet (4 meter) long, Emery told LiveScience.

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