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Hillington Phallus souvenir hits King’s Lynn Museum’s shelves

Hillington Phallus souvenir hits King’s Lynn Museum’s shelves | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Visitors to Lynn Museum can now buy a rather unusual souvenir from the gift shop.
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Taphonomic analysis of Neolithic seated burials

Taphonomic analysis of Neolithic seated burials | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Taphonomy is the study of how organisms decay and become altered following their death. Understanding how this process manifests in human burials during the excavation is extremely important, and can lead to improved interpretations of the burials when carried out properly.

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:22 PM

These guys always looked creepy to me, like they were somehow the reincarnated forms of those that had passed. Kind of like what archeologist think too, but what I mean is that they were born like that... now they die like that too. It's all kind of creepy to me.

Allie Lau's curator insight, January 17, 2014 1:36 AM

It is great that people who study taphonomy are able to study and examine the bodies found in ancient burial sites.

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One of the world's oldest breweries reconstructed

One of the world's oldest breweries reconstructed | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Over 5.5 thousand years old brewing installation discovered by Polish archaeological mission at Tell el-Farcha in Egypt has been reconstructed in 3D by Karolina Rosińska-Balik, PhD student at the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology.

"The presented reconstruction is a hypothetical assumption based on preserved structures of similar analogous buildings at both Tell el-Farcha and other brewing centres in Upper Egypt" - reserved the archaeologist.

 

The installation consists of three vat pits and measures about 3.4 by 4 m. The entire structure, with plan reminiscent of a three-leaf clover, was surrounded by a wall with a height of up to 60 cm. Vat pits were also separated from each other with low, narrow walls.

 

In order to stabilize the vessels used for brewing beer, base was used in the form of a solid clay, which was surrounded by a clay ring with a clear break.

 

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Are King Alfred's bones in Hampshire?

Are King Alfred's bones in Hampshire? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A community group wants to analyse the bones exhumed from a graveyard in Hampshire to see if they belong to King Alfred the Great.

Archaeologists removed the remains from an unmarked grave at St Bartholomew's near Winchester earlier this year.

 

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The Facts in the Ground: Archaeological resistance during Occupy Gezi « State Crime

The Facts in the Ground: Archaeological resistance during Occupy Gezi « State Crime | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In Turkey, there appears to be a policy of illegal non-employment of archaeologists in order to ensure the non-recovery and non-documentation of politically-unacceptable cultural heritage.  That is to say that the state seems to violate its own law, which requires the employment of archaeologists for the assessment of development work and the performance of cultural heritage work. This violation prevents archaeologists from prohibiting culturally-destructive activity and excavating and recording material which is evidence of politically-inconvenient pasts.

So when repression provoked democratic resistance in Turkey earlier this year, archaeologists were on the front line as victims of government policy and police brutality and as advocates of real democracy. The first protester hospitalised at Gezi Park was an archaeology student, Hazar Berk Büyüktunca, and both unions and autonomously-organised platforms went to the occupations and squares to resist  out of professional responsibility.

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Bahrain history slowly rises from sands

Bahrain history slowly rises from sands | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

More than 4,000 years ago, Dilmun merchants traveled from Mesopotamia to the Indus River, titans of trade and culture before rise of the empires of the Persians or the Ottomans

Over a millennia, the civilization that Dilmun created on the back of trading in pearls, copper and dates as far as South Asia faded into the encroaching sands. It wasn't until an excavation by Danish archaeologists in the 1950s that its past was rediscovered.

Now, with Bahrain in a deepening political crisis between its Sunni rulers and majority Shiite population, the connection to ancient Dilmun is one of the few unifying symbols on the island. It also is a rare and vivid look at pre-Islamic life in a region with few sites celebrating cultures before the time of the Prophet Muhammad.

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Ryley Caron's curator insight, September 19, 2013 9:17 PM

This is amazing how these buildings are still standing, or what is left of them at least. They are so beautiful, but it is weird to see how much buildings have changed. In one of the pictures, you can the modern day buildings in the background of the ancient buildings.

Kasey Saeturn's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:10 PM

Never have I heard in history of these Dilmun merchants. They sound like big travelers because who could know the distance from Mesopotamia and the Indus River and knowing that back then there were no cars the distance and time from could be months or even years of travel which is crazy because we get around so easily nowadays and even walking from close distances can be problematic to people of today.

abigail's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:32 PM

mesopotamia forms one part of all the ancient trading that has formed the negociations that all countries have till todays date. 

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Open Season on History

Open Season on History | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

FOR archaeologists like me, the Flowerdew Hundred Plantation near Williamsburg, Va., is our Woodstock, a sentimental spot where dozens of professionals earned their trowels. The farm’s incredible archaeological wealth ranges from 12,000-year-old Native American tools to a tree that shaded Union soldiers in June 1864.

 

Imagine our dismay, then, when a professed “relic hunter” from Texas named Larry Cissna sold some $60,000 in tickets for his Grand National Relic Shootout — an artifact-hunting competition — at Flowerdew Hundred. The shootout took place in early March, and participants walked away with 8,961 artifacts dating from the Civil War or before.

 

In Virginia, as in many states, relic hunting is illegal on public land, but legal on private land. Flowerdew, it turns out, belongs to the James C. Justice Companies, whose chairman, president and chief executive is James C. Justice II, whom Forbes ranks as the 882nd-wealthiest individual on the planet. (According to a spokesman, Mr. Justice was unaware of the “shootout.”)

Paid hunts like this have increased in the last 15 years, fueled by the market for Civil War relics, where a rare button can bring $5,000. Mr. Cissna has built a small empire using a Web site to organize hunts and sell advertising, a job that became easier in June when the Travel Channel began airing his reality show, “Dig Wars.”

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Meet Ancient Peru's own Grumpy Cat - Boing Boing

Meet Ancient Peru's own Grumpy Cat - Boing Boing | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Grumpy Cat, Shocked Cat, Lil Bub – their images are the currency of the web, passed between friends, family, and co-workers. When they go viral, funny cat pictures heal daily drudgery with a dose of furry, cuddly cheer. But, in terms of the reverence they receive, these cats are hardly the first of their kind. Ancient cultures had cat memes too, and archaeologists have their own term for them: feline motifs.

 

The word meme, itself a meme, feels ultra-modern, but was coined in the 1970s by Richard Dawkins to refer to any non-genetic unit of replicated information. And it would be chronocentric to presume this term applied only to the proverbial Caturdays following its contemporary articulation. Some archaeologists, known as evolutionary archaeologists, incorporate memetics into their explanations of cultural transmission and change. In their view, cultural evolution, or the speciation of different cultures, happens by selective forces acting on cultural memes, motifs and styles.

 

We can look back about two thousand years and see cat memes on objects made in the Americas before Columbus set boot here. In fact, the feline motif is a powerful point of acccess to Pre-Columbian cultures, as it was a common from the Mississippi to the tip of South America.

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The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project

The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Rothwell Charnel Chapel and Ossuary Project has been established between the Department of Archaeology, at the University of Sheffield and Rothwell Holy Trinity Church, Northamptonshire. The church houses one of only two known surviving and in situ medieval ossuaries in England.

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Ancient Feathered Shield Discovered in Peru Temple

Ancient Feathered Shield Discovered in Peru Temple | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The ritualistic shield, dating back some 1,300 years, was made by the Moche people and provides evidence that the Moche may have engaged in ritualized battles like gladiatorial combat.

 

Made by the Moche people, the rare artifact was found face down on a sloped surface that had been turned into a bench or altar at the site of Pañamarca.

 

Located near two ancient murals, one of which depicts a supernatural monster, the shield measures about 10 inches (25 centimeters) in diameter and has a base made of carefully woven basketry with a handle.

 

Its surface is covered with red-and-brown textiles along with about a dozen yellow feathers that were sewn on and appear to be from the body of a macaw.  The shield would have served a ritualistic rather than a practical use, and the placement of the shield on the bench or altar appears to have been the last act carried out before this space was sealed and a new, larger, temple built on top of it. [See Photos of the Shield & Ancient Murals]

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Downham Market’s railway heritage is preserved for future generations

Downham Market’s railway heritage is preserved for future generations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A stunning Victorian signal box in Downham has been safeguarded for future generations.

The town’s signal box is one of the five rare examples across the region to have been granted Grade II listed status last week.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has awarded listed status to 26 signal boxes across the country as part of a joint project between Network Rail and English Heritage to secure the nation’s railway signalling heritage.

Downham’s signal box was built in 1881 for the Great Eastern Railway Company but will soon be decommissioned as part of a 30-year modernisation project.

 

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Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar

Neolithic engraved stone discovered at the Ness of Brodgar | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Throughout the excavations at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney, numerous examples of Neolithic “art” have been uncovered. In fact, by 2010 around 80 “decorated” items had emerged from the site.

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joseph mora's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:31 PM

Art found from excavations from the neolithic period. they held engrave picture from simple to more complexed.

Shannon Bench's curator insight, October 4, 2013 3:35 PM

All I've got to say is... Damn they had skill!

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:06 AM

This scoop is about the discovery of a Neolithic dated engraved stone at the Ness of Brodgar on the Scottish island of Orkney

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700 year old deer park discovered in Wales

700 year old deer park discovered in Wales | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Excavations led by Cardiff University archaeologists has helped to confirm the presence of a  royal 13th century deer park at Brynkir in Gwynedd, north Wales.

Likely constructed under the reign of Llywelyn the Great (1195–1240) who brought unity to Wales, the discovery was first made during the 2012 excavation season by a member of the team from Manchester Metropolitan University. The royal deer park dates to pre 1230 when Llywelyn moved his regional power centre elsewhere to Criccieth.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient ship to set sail again to Egypt

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient ship to set sail again to Egypt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A ship that served both for trade and as a warship in the ancient city of Phaselis in the southern province of Antalya will be reconstructed by Akdeniz University
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Kalah Atherton's curator insight, April 18, 2014 2:31 AM

An interesting project, recreating an ancient ship and actually using it. Have a read of this article and conscider the project these guys are undertaking and the magnitude of the experiment. Now, answer the following, remembering to take into conscideration all parts of the questions:

1) To what extent can historians benefit from this project? How will they benefit, what will the learn?

2) How important was trade and transport in Ancient times? How did trade especially benefit Ancient civilizations?

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The Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination

The Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

One of the world’s oldest religions, Zoroastrianism originated amongst Iranian tribes in Central Asia during the second millennium BCE and spread to Iran where it became the principal faith until the advent of Islam. Central to the religion is the belief in a sole creator god, Ahura Mazda, his agent Zarathustra (Zoroaster) and the dichotomy between good and evil.

The Everlasting Flame: Zoroastrianism in History and Imagination to be held at the Brunei Gallery, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, is the first exhibition of it’s kind to provide a visual narrative of the history of Zoroastrianism, its rich cultural heritage and the influence it has had on the major world religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

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Rich Thracian tomb with lion-goat ornament discovered in Sliven

Rich Thracian tomb with lion-goat ornament discovered in Sliven | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Sliven. Archaeologists discovered a rich Thracian grave from the 1st century AD in a mound in the municipality Sliven in south-eastern Bulgaria.
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Cambyses’ Lost Army and the Physics of Sandstorms | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network

Cambyses’ Lost Army and the Physics of Sandstorms | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Over the weekend Jen-Luc Piquant found herself pondering the works of Herodotus, specifically the tale of the Lost Army of Cambyses. Sometime around 524 BC, priests at the oracle of the Temple of Amun decided they didn’t much care for their new ruler, Cambyses II, son of Cyrus the Great. Cambyses decided that he didn’t much care for their insubordination. And he had soldiers — 50,000 of them, sent marching through the Sahara from Thebes to put those rebellious priests in their place.

But they never reached their destination (the Oasis of Siwa, where the mutinous temple was located).  Seven days into their march, a massive sandstorm broke out and buried Cambyses’ entire army, never to be seen again. Per Herodotus: “A wind arose from the south, strong and deadly, bringing with it vast columns of whirling sand, which entirely covered up the troops and caused them wholly to disappear.”

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First Hadrian’s Wall was built of wood

First Hadrian’s Wall was built of wood | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A HEXHAM archaeologist has challenged perceived wisdom with startling claims that Hadrian’s Wall was originally built of wood.

 

In a 65,000 word thesis published on his website, Geoff Carter says his hypothesis answers some age-old questions.

Archaeologists have long wondered why the ditch that runs parallel is several feet away from the Wall itself, reducing its effectiveness as a deterrent to invaders.

They also question why the ditch curves inwards towards each of the milecastles.

The answer, says Mr Carter, is that the ditch was originally dug at the foot of a timber wall that was put up as a temporary measure.

The temporary wall ran between each of the milecastles, providing a swift means of defence against marauding Scots while auxiliaries built the permanent stone wall behind.

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A Blog on the ‘Magical Wonders of Archaeological Photography!!! | Ham Hill hillfort Archeology

A Blog on the ‘Magical Wonders of Archaeological Photography!!! | Ham Hill hillfort Archeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

nce upon a time… about half an hour ago actually, we (Paul, Stef and Ceris) witnessed the magical wonders of archaeological photography. Before our enlightening experience we knew less about cameras than a fish knows about a tropical tree. As we believe our pictures show we are now experts in the field of handling very expensive fancy cameras. We learnt there is more to life than pointing and clicking! There are ways of making your pictures actually look good! By (if you did not know before) simply altering your aperture and shutter speed! AMAZING!

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Dig reveals full extent of convicts' mass grave on Spike Island

Dig reveals full extent of convicts' mass grave on Spike Island | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have identified for the first time the full extent of a convicts’ mass grave on what was once a notorious concentration camp-style prison in Cork harbour.

 

The Spike Island Archaeological Project team, led by UCC archaeologist, Dr Barra Ó Donnabháin, has identified up to 250 previously unmarked burial plots, all dating from Famine times, within a walled cemetery area on Spike Island in Cork Harbour.

“We have always known that this area contained graves but we never knew how many,” Dr Ó Donnabháin said.

“There were about 11 headstones in this area, all dating from 1862, but which are not now in their original locations.

“Following geophysical analysis, we identified four or five rows with about 50 individual graves in each.”

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Ancient timber post on display at Beccles museum

Ancient timber post on display at Beccles museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A timber post used by people to help them across the boggy marshes of the Waveney Valley more than 2,000 years ago has gone on display at a local museum.

 

The timber posts were discovered by workmen undertaking a flood defence scheme close to the River Waveney at Beccles in 2006.

At first they were thought to be a relatively modern feature because they were so well preserved.

 

However, when archaeologists were called in they were able to confirm that the timbers were from a much earlier construction.

In further digs during 2007 and 2009, archaeologists from Birmingham University managed to remove the posts.

 

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Eye in sky is a view into Angus history

Eye in sky is a view into Angus history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

With one eye on recording Scotland’s ancient history and another on the ground, Dave Cowley is the Indiana Jones of the skies.

He is aerial survey projects manager with Royal Commission of Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) and he and his colleagues make 40 to 50 trips a year in a four-seater Cessna to record rare glimpses of the past.

And this hot, dry summer has provided the best conditions in years to see crop marks, which reveal evidence of ancient settlements long lost to modern agriculture methods.

While farmers rue the arid weather, Mr Cowley said now is the time to take to the air and survey “the glorious detail” of Roman forts and Iron Age camps “lost” since the 1970s.

 

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Miners desecrated Aboriginal site

Miners desecrated Aboriginal site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A mining company has been convicted of desecrating an Aboriginal site in Australia's Northern Territory.

Mining firm OM Manganese was found guilty on Friday - the first time a company has been successfully prosecuted in Australia for desecration of a sacred site.

The site is known as Two Women Sitting Down and is at Bootu Creek, north of Tennant Creek.

OM Manganese was fined A$150,000 ($134,000; £88,000).

Peter Toth, CEO of OM Holdings, which owns OM Manganese, said: "The company never intended to harm, damage or disrespect the sacred site."

"We sincerely regret the damage and the hurt caused and I unreservedly apologise to the site's custodians and traditional owners," he said.

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Inca child sacrifices were drunk, stoned for weeks before death - NBC News.com

Inca child sacrifices were drunk, stoned for weeks before death - NBC News.com | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Three Inca children found mummified atop a 20,000-foot volcano in South America consumed increasing amounts of coca leaf and corn beer for up to a year before they were sacrificed, according to a new study.

Sedation by the plant and alcohol combined with the frigid, high-altitude setting may explain how the children were killed. There is no evidence for direct violence, the researchers noted.

The coca leaf and corn beer consumption rises about six months before death and then skyrockets in the final weeks, especially for the eldest, a 13-year-old girl known as the "Ice Maiden."

"She was probably heavily sedated by the point at which she succumbs to death," Andrew Wilson, an archaeologist at the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom and the study's lead author, told NBC News.

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The village people? An early history of neighbourly disputes

The village people? An early history of neighbourly disputes | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Villages occupy a curious place in the British psyche. Symbols of an imaginary pre-industrial bliss villages seem to be widely regarded as sacred expressions of Britishness, a style of life that defines us as a people and which separates us from the rest of the world (Figure 1).
Conversely in Ireland villages are widely regarded as a foreign import, one of many aspects of life that are part of the legacy of unwelcome English interference.

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