Archaeology News
Follow
Find
111.1K views | +20 today
Archaeology News
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The smuggling scandal that's ready to erupt

The smuggling scandal that's ready to erupt | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Metropolitan Museum may not be the last institution to return looted sculptures to Cambodia. By Vincent Noce

The return to Cambodia of two tenth-century Khmer sandstone sculptures, which had been displayed for nearly 20 years at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, made headline news around the world this summer. The restitution was greeted enthusiastically by Cambodia’s Council of Ministers when the sculptures, looted from the ancient city of Koh Ker in the 1970s, arrived in Phnom Penh in June. The restitution is now shining a spotlight on the degree of damage to Koh Ker and raises questions about a number of masterpiece sculptures in public and private collections.

See also:

• Cambodian restitution case takes surprising twist

The so-called “Kneeling Attendants” are now known to have come from Prasat Chen, the temple complex at the heart of Chok Gargyar (today called Koh Ker), which, for a short period in the tenth century, eclipsed even Angkor in its magnificence. Koh Ker is in a remote part of northern Cambodia; it was covered by jungle for centuries and only rediscovered in the late 19th century. Although there was previous damage, many experts say that looting began in earnest during the political upheaval and civil war of the 1960s and 1970s, and amid the chaos of the rule of the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979, although others say that the extensive damage is even more recent.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Seeking Ancient Beauty at Athens' Archaeological Museum

Seeking Ancient Beauty at Athens' Archaeological Museum | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The photo exhibition “Seeking ancient kallos” (beauty) by American photographer Joshua Garrick opened on September 12 at The National Archaeological Museum in Athens. The exhibit runs until January 8, 2014.

The title of the exhibition marks his desire to seek the core of classical beauty, captured on ancient sculptures which he has been photographing for the last decades in Greek Museums. In this exhibition, Garrick’s works are black and white photographs printed on aluminum DiBond, which highlight often unseen details of illustrious Greek treasures including some of the most famous sculptures of history, exhibited in the National Archaeological Museum.

In his own words, “My love of all-things-Greek comes from the fact that what we most treasure in Western Civilization – our legacy of art, history, theatre, philosophy, and government – ALL comes from that singular place and time in history. Out of respect for those geniuses who lived in Athens 2,500 years ago, I feel a ‘religious responsibility’ when I photograph their ancient statues and monuments. At this moment in history, it is more important than ever for all of us to understand the real ‘wealth’ of Greece – the inestimable ‘wealth’ of Greece is located within the walls of the National Archaeological Museum, which celebrates that ancient genius.”

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Uros people found to have distinctive genetic ancestries - Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Uros people found to have distinctive genetic ancestries - Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

New genetic research led by the Genographic Project consortium shows a distinctive ancestry for the Uros populations of Peru and Bolivia that pre-dates the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores and may date back to the earliest settlement of the Altiplano, or high plain, of the central Andes some 3,700 years ago.

more...
Michelle Thick's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:45 AM

Useful for ARCH 3 genetics

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Extraordinary kurgan burial shines new light on Sarmatian life

Extraordinary kurgan burial shines new light on Sarmatian life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A Sarmatian burial mound excavated this summer in Russia’s Southern Ural steppes has yielded a magnificent but unusual treasure.

The artefacts contained within the mound are helping to shed light on a little-known period of the nomadic culture that flourished on the Eurasian steppe in the 1st millennium BC.

The archaeological study of this remarkable ancient tomb, or kurgan, was carried out by the expedition of the Institute of Archaeology (Russian Academy of Sciences), led by Professor Leonid T. Yablonsky.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Land of the tomb raiders: Bulgaria is trying to claw back tens of thousands of ancient artefacts plundered from its historic sites in a £25m-a-year export racket

Land of the tomb raiders: Bulgaria is trying to claw back tens of thousands of ancient artefacts plundered from its historic sites in a £25m-a-year export racket | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Real-life vampires, giant rock vaginas, ancient sites to rival those of Greece and Rome – Bulgaria’s archaeologists are putting their country on the map of world history, but first they have to stop the mafia stealing its treasures.

 

The illegal diggers come at night with shovels and sacks, hunting through the places where they know the professionals have been. They’re looking for the tonnes of ancient artefacts that lie hidden in Bulgaria’s soil.

 

In the past two decades, Bulgarian law enforcement agencies say this plunder has turned into a €30m-a-year industry for local gangs, putting it a close third behind drugs and prostitution. The artefacts – gold Roman coins, ancient Greek silver, Thracian military helmets – wind up with falsified documents in auction houses in Europe and North America, or increasingly with wealthy Arab and Asian collectors.

 

Police say there are 300 criminal treasure-hunting gangs in Bulgaria at present, but as many as 50,000 people are thought to be involved in illegal digging in some form. Entire villages have been known to take part in some impoverished corners of Bulgaria.

 

more...
Michelle Thick's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:48 AM

Useful for ARCH 3 ethics

Rescooped by David Connolly from Shallow Geophysics
Scoop.it!

Guest Post: Geophysics on Basingstoke Common – Clare Allen ...

Guest Post: Geophysics on Basingstoke Common – Clare Allen ... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Magnetometry is an efficient geophysical method used to measure the variation of magnetic properties of the soil. It is mostly suited to identifying highly oxidised material such as kilns, ovens, hearths, ditches and pits.

Via Martin Roseveare
more...
Michelle Thick's curator insight, September 15, 2013 5:51 AM

Nice example of magnetometry

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Our African follower for over 70,000 years

Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Our African follower for over 70,000 years | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of deadliest infectious diseases of humans, killing 50% of individuals when left untreated. Even today, TB causes 1-2 million deaths every year mainly in developing countries. Multidrug-resistance is a growing threat in the fight against the disease.

An international group of researchers led by Sebastien Gagneux from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) has now identified the origin in time and space of the disease. Using whole-genome sequencing of 259 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains collected from different parts of the world, they determined the genetic pedigree of the deadly bugs.

This genome comparison to be published September 1st in the journal Nature Genetics indicates that TB mycobacteria originated at least 70,000 years ago in Africa.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Declassified spy photographs reveal lost Roman frontier - Phys.Org

Declassified spy photographs reveal lost Roman frontier - Phys.Org | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Corona satellite imagery of the wall. Declassified spy photography has uncovered a lost Roman Eastern frontier, dating from the second century AD. Research by archaeologists at the Universities of Glasgow and Exeter has identified a long wall that ran 60 kilometers from the Danube to the Black Sea over what is modern Romania. It is considered the most easterly example of a man-made frontier barrier system in the Roman Empire. Built in the mid-second century AD, 'Trajan's Rampart' as it is known locally, once stood 8.5m wide and over 3.5m high and included at least 32 forts and 31 smaller fortlets along its course. It is thought to have served a similar purpose to other Roman frontier walls, such as Hadrian's Wall, built to defend the Empire from threats to the borders. Trajan's Rampart actually consists of three separate walls of different dates; the 'Small Earthen Wall', the 'Large Earthen Wall' and the 'Stone Wall'. The constructions were previously known about, although wrongly thought to date to the Byzantine or Early medieval period.
more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 4, 2013 11:17 AM

Using high tech to uncover the past.  The only problem is that we have to wait years for some of the material to become declassified.

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Returning Maya Ancestors to Their Place of Origin

Returning Maya Ancestors to Their Place of Origin | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Mayapán Taboo Cenote Project will undertake an extensive exploration of the underwater cave, Cenote Sac Uayum, to document 20+ submerged skeletons and artifacts. Team leader and National Geographic Grantee Bradley Russell will also investigate the modern belief that a supernatural power- a feathered serpent- guards the water within.

—–

With support from The Waitt Foundation for Exploration and The National Geographic Society, The Mayapán Taboo Cenote Project has concluded its first season of exploration at Cenote Sac Uayum, a sacred, water-bearing sinkhole located at the Postclassic Maya political capital of Mayapán, Yucatan, Mexico (1100-1450AD).

My co-directors, Eunice Uc (INAH Centro Yucatan) and Carlos Peraza Lope (INAH Centro Yucatan), and I have enlisted the help of diver Rait Kütt and diver/archaeologist Lisseth Pedroza Fuentes to explore and document the various ceramics and human remains that indicate use of the cenote by the area’s ancient inhabitants.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

The hills have eyes... and a spear

The hills have eyes... and a spear | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

UFFINGTON has its incomparable prehistoric white horse, Dorset boasts the amusingly shameless and boastful Cerne Abbas Giant and Wilmington in Sussex is known for its enigmatic Long Man.

And today it can be revealed that for the best part of 3,000 years a hillside near Swindon was the site of an epic chalk carving of a giant spearman.

The 130ft high hill figure at Foxhill near Wanborough is believed to have been maintained for generations, almost certainly in honour of pagan gods worshipped throughout the centuries.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeological mystery on the shore of James Bay

Archaeological mystery on the shore of James Bay | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archeologists, technicians, and volunteers will dig in northern Quebec this week in hopes of confirming the age of artifacts believed to be up to 7,000 years old

 

A broken arrowhead and other items, found by a resident of the Waskaganish First Nation last summer, could be between 3,000 to 7,000 years old, said James Chism, curator of archeology at the Waskaganish Cultural Institute.

The artifacts are not on par with the oldest archeological finds in Quebec, but they are the oldest items found in the region, he said.

 

The objects were likely used as blades for knives or spears, parts of an axe, and tools to scrape animal hides. They are in various states of completion, with some still needing refining and others seemingly broken, Chism explained.

 

All the artifacts were found on the ground, prompting speculation there may be more items lying below the surface at the site, about 30 km east of the village. The hope is that a dig will produce charred bones, pieces of charcoal, more tools, or other items that can be tested in order to date the artifacts, he said.

more...
Coutellerie Thiers's curator insight, September 2, 2013 4:04 AM

Il y a 7000 ans le port du couteau était autorisé :-)

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

First Iron Age loch village discovery in Scotland

First Iron Age loch village discovery in Scotland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an Iron Age ‘loch village’ in Wigtownshire, the first of its kind to be found in Scotland. Experts believe that the significant find could be ‘Scotland’s Glastonbury’, a reference to the Glastonbury Lake Village in Somerset, a site of international significance.

The excavation was part-financed with £15,000 from Historic Scotland, and carried out this summer by AOC Archaeology Group, who hope to use this year’s pilot excavation as the starting point for a broader programme of archaeological activity with multiple funders.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Four thousand year old sheepskin recovered from burial cist in Sutherland

Four thousand year old sheepskin recovered from burial cist in Sutherland | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When a prehistoric burial was accidentally discovered in September 2011 during the construction of a septic tank at Spinningdale in Sutherland, GUARD Archaeology were called out to investigate and made an extraordinary find.

Through Historic Scotland’s Human Remain Call-Off Contract, the GUARD Archaeology team, led by Iraia Arabaolaza, were commissioned to excavate a stone cist, built within a substantial pit, containing the remains of a crouched inhumation of a middle-aged adult female (35-50 years) with signs of spinal joint disease.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Conquering the Atacama desert - Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Conquering the Atacama desert - Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Few archaeological sites in South America contain uncontroversial evidence for when the first peopling of the continent occurred. Largely ignored in this debate, extreme environments are assumed either as barriers to this early wave of migration or without potential for past habitability.

The heart of the Atacama desert is one of the the driest place on Earth, yet the first settlers of South America set up home there more than 12,790 years ago.

The desert was just as harsh then as it is today however, Claudio Latorre of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile in Santiago and other archaeologists, have been excavating a site called Quebrada Manih which lies 85 kilometres inland, 1240 metres above sea level and only receives rain a few times a century.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists may have found remains of Holy Trinity church in York excavations

Archaeologists may have found remains of Holy Trinity church in York excavations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

ARCHAEOLOGISTS who may have found the remains of a medieval church in York city centre will carry out further investigations next week to determine whether more detailed excavations are necessary.

 

The King’s Square discovery was unearthed by City of York Council’s archaeological team following a dig which started last week as part of Reinvigorate York.

 

They believe the remains could be part of Holy Trinity church, first mentioned in 1268, but as it was demolished in 1861 and replaced by a Victorian church, it is difficult to tell which building the bricks belong to.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Lakeshore archeology dig finds artifacts from 4,000 years ago (With video)

Lakeshore archeology dig finds artifacts from 4,000 years ago (With video) | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

More than 80,000 artifacts that provide a glimpse of life in the region 4,000 years ago have been recovered by archeologists on the banks of the Puce River.

While most of the arrowheads and pieces of pottery found are 1,000 to 1,200 years old, scientists kept digging deeper and eventually came across artifacts that were 4,000 years old, said Jacqueline Fisher, an archeologist hired by the county.

The artifacts were discovered during an environmental assessment for the construction of an expanded Puce River bridge on County Road 22.

“It was like excavating a layer cake,” Fisher said. “You move down to the plate and you move back in time.”

The excavation was done by hand over a one-hectare dig site. Some artifacts were discovered in soil less than a foot deep and Fisher said there was evidence of later Euro-Canadian habitation, including the impression of a wood cabin.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Third and second century BC rock tombs unearthed in southeastern part of Turkey

Third and second century BC rock tombs unearthed in southeastern part of Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Construction in the southeastern province of Mardin’s Midyat district has unearthed ancient rock tombs that are believed to date from the pagan era between the third and second centuries B.C. 

The tombs were discovered during construction works that were being conducted to enlarge a road heading to a tent city erected for Syrian refugees. 

A total of four rock tombs were initially discovered, but subsequent excavation work at Mor İbraham Church and other venues revealed an additional 11 tombs, some with human skeletons.

Midyat District Gov. Oğuzhan Bingöl said the tombs had been discovered by chance and that they had begun a new information project under the direction of the Mardin Museum.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Roman soldier’s chain mail found at battle site

Roman soldier’s chain mail found at battle site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists from Freie Universität Berlin made a spectacular discovery in their excavations of a Roman-Germanic battlefield at the Harzhorn in Lower Saxony. While exploring the area near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the researchers, headed by Prof. Dr. Michael Meyer, found the chain mail of a Roman soldier from the Third Century AD.

It was the first time that such a well-preserved piece of body armour was excavated on a Roman-Germanic battlefield. This find made it possible to reconstruct an individual story in the battle, a close-up image of the war, said Michael Meyer, a professor of prehistoric archaeology at Freie Universität Berlin.

more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:30 AM

Chain mail was made by hand by forging many small links of iron together - this was time consuming work.  The smaller the links the greater the protection from swords.  Finding these pieces of metal gives a greater picture of the landscape of an ancient battle.

Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

12,000 year old lineage of the first settlers in the Americas

12,000 year old lineage of the first settlers in the Americas | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

About 30 human skeletons that have been dated to the second millennium BC have been discovered in the cave of La Grave, in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, and could provide vital clues relating to the first settlers in the Americas according to archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Scientists have unearthed ancient artifacts that are upending the history of ... - Charleston City Paper

Scientists have unearthed ancient artifacts that are upending the history of ... - Charleston City Paper | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Charleston City Paper Scientists have unearthed ancient artifacts that are upending the history of ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Date and olive pits dispel mystery of King Solomon's mines - Haaretz

Date and olive pits dispel mystery of King Solomon's mines - Haaretz | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Haaretz Date and olive pits dispel mystery of King Solomon's mines Haaretz The copper mines at Timna were long thought to have been operated by Egyptians in the 13th century B.C.E., but organic remains now show that they reached their prime during...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Excavations underway at the largest hillfort in Britain

Excavations underway at the largest hillfort in Britain | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

An excavation at Ham Hill, the largest Iron-Age hill fort in Britain, has revealed more about how the ancient structure was developed by its defenders in response to the Roman invasion.

Researchers have been studying the fort, which covers more than 80 hectares of the Somerset countryside, for the past three years in an attempt to understand more about its function, and how such a large structure was defended by the local population.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Battle of Flodden fights to take its rightful place in Scottish history

Battle of Flodden fights to take its rightful place in Scottish history | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

In a few days, a ceremony will be held at Branxton church, near Coldstream in Northumberland. Those gathered will commemorate Scots and English troops slain during one of the bloodiest acts of war ever fought in Britain: the battle of Flodden, which took place 500 years ago next week. Those killed included James IV of Scotland, the last king to die in battle on British soil.

The battle, which claimed the lives of 10,000 Scots and 4,000 English, re-arranged the political map of Europe, allowing England to promote its continental military campaigns without northerly distraction. Yet outside the Borders, it is little known today.

By contrast, Bannockburn has become a cornerstone of Scottish history and celebrations for its 700th anniversary – to be held shortly before next year’s independence referendum – have received millions of pounds of grants from the Scottish government. No such funding has gone on commemorating Flodden, despite the numbers of Scots slain there.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Card sharks and fistfights come to life in Virginia City dig

Card sharks and fistfights come to life in Virginia City dig | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The archaeological site on Jackson Street, Virginia City, Montana has been a major attraction for tourists, causing the Montana State University students who are working there to spend a lot of time explaining it.

Nancy Mahoney, MSU adjunct professor of anthropology says “That is just fine, because that is part of why we’re here – to try and tell the story of Jackson Street, and by  inviting the public in it has made [the site] more meaningful than your typical archaeological dig. “

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Connolly
Scoop.it!

Thousands criticise plan for Oswestry’s ancient site

Thousands criticise plan for Oswestry’s ancient site | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A total of 5,620 people from than 20 countries have signed an online petition against plans to build homes in the shadow of one of Shropshire’s most prominent ancient monuments.
more...
No comment yet.