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The home of the last Neanderthals – Archaeology News from Past...

The home of the last Neanderthals – Archaeology News from Past... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

When a team of archaeologists undertook fieldwork to stabilise and investigate a portion of La Cotte de St Brelade, a cave on Jersey’s south eastern coastline, they realised that a record of Neanderthal archaeology, long  thought to be lost, was still  preserved.

 

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Neanderthal used toothpicks to mitigate pain – Archaeology News...

Neanderthal used toothpicks to mitigate pain – Archaeology News... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New research based on the Cova Foradà Neanderthal fossil shows that this hominid used toothpicks to mitigate pain caused by oral diseases
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Bones to shape stones – Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Bones to shape stones – Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Bone retouchers that represent significant behavioural changes seemingly taking place between 400 and 300 thousand years ago
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Berlin Museum Seeks Return of Ancient Gold Tablet

Berlin Museum Seeks Return of Ancient Gold Tablet | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Berlin Museum Seeks Return of Ancient Gold Tablet
ABC News
A renowned Berlin antiquities museum is trying to get back an ancient gold tablet excavated from an Assyrian temple that a Holocaust survivor somehow obtained after World War II.
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Vast ancient tomb raised from the dead by restoration

Vast ancient tomb raised from the dead by restoration | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
An enormous burial mound that captures the rays of the rising equinox sun has regained its splendour after a nine-year restoration
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Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, October 13, 2013 4:33 PM

An underground Stonehenge!

 

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Holy Hittite city being unearthed in northern Turkey

ARCHAEOLOGY - Holy Hittite city being unearthed in northern Turkey | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeological excavations have been ongoing for eight years in the village of Oymaağaç of Vezirköprü district in the northern province of Samsun, aiming to unearth the holy Hittite city of Nerik. The head of the excavations, German archaeologist Associate Professor Rainer Czichon said that works in Oymaağaç had started in 2005 and this year’s excavations had now ended.

Czichon said that they had carried out surface survey during the first two years, and then started excavations. “Our goal is to prove that Oymaağaç is the holy city of the Hittite, which is Nerik. “We already know that this region is a Hittite settlement. We have found cuneiform tablets that will prove that this place is Nerik. There are scriptures about Nerik in four cuneiform tablets that we found this year. There is a part named ‘Tahanga’ in two of the tablets. Tahanga is a section in Nerik’s ‘god of air’ temple. This is a strong proof that Oymaağaç is Nerik. We are sure for 95 percent,” Czichon said.

 

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Shannon Bench's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:14 PM

The holy crap that's a large city! Hattusa, the best place on earth... until they had a drought.

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Bronze Age Europe - the first Industrial revolution –...

Bronze Age Europe - the first Industrial revolution –... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

As part of a larger pan-European study investigating the Bronze Age of Europe, an archaeologist from the University of Gothenburg has provided the first evidence of long distance travel by an individual – probably from southern Sweden – into the territory of the Únětice culture of Silesia.

The doctoral thesis confirms evidence based on bioarchaeological data.

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New archaeoastronomical alignments found at Machu Picchu –...

New archaeoastronomical alignments found at Machu Picchu –... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists excavating at the famous Inca site of Machu Picchu in Peru have discovered the remains of an astronomical observatory
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ARCHAEOLOGY - World’s biggest column head found in Balıkesir

ARCHAEOLOGY - World’s biggest column head found in Balıkesir | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest and the most magnificent Corinthian-style temple column head has been unearthed during excavations at the Temple of Hadrian in the western province of Balıkesir.
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Restoration work ends at Hierapolis theater

ARCHAEOLOGY - Restoration work ends at Hierapolis theater | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavations are continuing in the western province of Denizli’s ancient city of Hierapolis
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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:09 AM

This scoop is about the restoration of an ancient theatre in Heirapolis which in is modern day Turkey.

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Kootenay pictographs vandalized with paintball pellets

Kootenay pictographs vandalized with paintball pellets | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Government archaeologists are trying to determine how to clean up some vandalism of First Nation rock art after someone apparently blasted paintball pellets at ancient pictographs near Nelson, B.C.
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Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, October 13, 2013 5:48 PM

Paintballs?  Come on people!   Go grafitti an overpass ferchrissakes.

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Ancient Cherokee Village Brings 18th Century Tribe To Life

Ancient Cherokee Village Brings 18th Century Tribe To Life | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Fall break is just a couple weeks away, and it may be a great time for a little history lesson here in Green Country.

A new and improved ancient village attracts people from all over the world, to learn about the Cherokees and how they lived in the early 18th Century.

Just outside the Cherokee Heritage Museum, on four acres, there's a village that almost looks like a movie set, where you'll likely see men playing a stickball game or women finger weaving.

It's a way of teaching people about Cherokee history and culture through an authentic experience of what tribal life was like in the early 1700s.

The Cherokee Nation has had an ancient village open for visitors since 1967, but it's now been replaced by a new, old village. It's much larger, and more historically accurate.

 

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Roman skulls washed down lost river

Roman skulls washed down lost river | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists working with London's Crossrail project have uncovered 20 skulls believed to be from the Roman period.

It is likely the bones were washed from a nearby burial site along one of London's "lost" rivers - the Walbrook.

Since the Crossrail project began, about 10,000 Roman items have been discovered.

 

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Rising sea threatens Stone Age village Skara Brae - Scotsman

Rising sea threatens Stone Age village Skara Brae - Scotsman | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Scotsman Rising sea threatens Stone Age village Skara Brae Scotsman Unesco said the monuments “proclaim the triumphs of the human spirit in early ages and isolated places” and “stand as a visible symbol of the achievements of early peoples away...
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Golden treasures from the time of Stonehenge – Archaeology News...

Golden treasures from the time of Stonehenge – Archaeology News... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Britain’s greatest treasures from the early Bronze Age period and Neolithic of Stonehenge are to be given a permanent display for the first time
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'Neolithic' burial mound to be built

'Neolithic' burial mound to be built | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A modern working "Neolithic" burial mound is to be built in Wiltshire.

The 50m (160ft) long barrow at All Cannings near Devizes, will contain niches that will house urns.

Work is expected to begin next spring and be completed by the summer, after Wiltshire Council approved the plans subject to planning conditions such as parking and landscaping.

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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 18, 2013 2:22 AM

This scoop is about how, starting next year a Neolithic burial mound will be constructed to resemble the same kind that were popular in Neolithic TImes.

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World's only surviving Bronze Age metropolis in Pakistan faces ruin

World's only surviving Bronze Age metropolis in Pakistan faces ruin | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archeologists say that 5,000 year-old city of Mohenjodaro, the world's oldest planned urban landscape, is being rapidly corroded by salt and could disappear within 20 years
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York Archaeology Trust's public archaeology uncovers lost medieval church in ... - Culture24

York Archaeology Trust's public archaeology uncovers lost medieval church in ... - Culture24 | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
York Archaeology Trust's public archaeology uncovers lost medieval church in ...
Culture24
a photo of an archaeologist working on a site. An Archaeologist at work on the lost medieval church St John the Baptist.© Courtesy York Archaeology Trust.
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Hunter gatherer and farmer lived side by side for 2000 years –...

Hunter gatherer and farmer lived side by side for 2000 years –... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Intriguing new results from a study undertaken by the Institute of Anthropology at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) that has just been published in the journal Science, show indigenous Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and immigrant Neolithic farmers lived side-by-side for more than 2,000 years in Central Europe.

 

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'Ancient humans' used toothpicks

'Ancient humans' used toothpicks | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
'Ancient humans' used toothpicks nearly 1.8 million years ago, a study of their teeth reveals.
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Reading the runestones of Denmark – Archaeology News from Past...

Reading the runestones of Denmark – Archaeology News from Past... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Danish National Museum Runestone Project sheds light on the numerous rune stones found across the whole country through a series of good quality images and text on Wikipedia. Now, the project is also available in a new smartphone app. from the Cultural Agency of Denmark’s ancient monuments, which can be downloaded free.

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Larkworthy Antfarm's curator insight, October 13, 2013 4:39 PM

Wonderful work being done by the Danish National Museum. Runestone Project  will allow scholars to get a firsthand look at these stones and the translated text. 


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Myanmar's ancient temple city faces modern danger

Myanmar's ancient temple city faces modern danger | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

he spires of Bagan have survived wars, earthquakes and centuries of tropical sun, but in recent years Myanmar's ancient capital has faced a distinctly modern threat -- scaffolding and cement.

The temples, some of which are around 1,000 years old, are one of the country's most treasured religious sites and a top attraction for foreign tourists flocking to the country as it emerges from decades of military rule.

While many have largely withstood the ravages of man and nature, haphazard renovation work has also seen new temples built on the foundations of crumbling structures, and experts say they bear little resemblance to the originals.

 

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Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 24, 2013 12:16 AM

I found this scoop really interesting. Initially I didn't know where Myanmar was but, after doing some research I found out that it is a small country right next to Thailand. So this scoop mainly talks about these ancient temples in Myanmar that have been destroyed from erosion. So now the country is trying to rebulid these beautiful places with the constant fear of inadequate funds and random earthquakes.

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1500 year old Swedish fortress massacre revealed – Archaeology...

1500 year old Swedish fortress massacre revealed – Archaeology... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists at Lund University have found what they describe as a moment frozen in time by a brutal massacre, leaving a fort untouched since the 5th century.

Excavation of the Iron Age Sandby borg – ringfort on Öland, an island off the southeastern coast of Sweden – has revealed a number of bodies, lying where they fell, in one case, it seems that a couple were cut down from behind as they ran through the house, another body lies in a doorway.

 

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9000 year old de-fleshing ritual revealed in the Philippines - Archaeology News from Past Horizons

9000 year old de-fleshing ritual revealed in the Philippines - Archaeology News from Past Horizons | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Archaeologists have recently published in the International Journal of Osteoarcheology, a full report on the discovery of early Holocene burials while excavating in the Ille cave, Palawan, Philippines, where the bones of one individual bear the marks of a complex de-fleshing ritual.

The island of Palawan, situated between Borneo to the south and the Philippine archipelago to the north and east, is important for its links with the Sundaic region of Southeast Asia. Many cave sites are known from the island, including Tabon Cave, which has the earliest recovered human remains in the Philippines (c. 45,000 years old).


Cremation burial as found. Ille cave site in the background. Images: V. Paz & H. Lewis

Ille is a solution cave and rockshelter at the base of a c. 75m-high karst tower near the village of New Ibajay, El Nido.  The site comprises east and west rock-shelter mouths, opening onto a relatively flat platform of silt loam, in a setting of light woodland. In 1998 the National Museum of the Philippines began a long-term survey and excavation programme in the region, including Ille and other nearby caves and their surroundings.

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Human brain boiled in its skull lasted 4000 years - life - 03 October 2013 - New Scientist

Human brain boiled in its skull lasted 4000 years - life - 03 October 2013 - New Scientist | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

SHAKEN, scorched and boiled in its own juices, this 4000-year-old human brain has been through a lot.

It may look like nothing more than a bit of burnt log, but it is one of the oldest brains ever found. Its discovery, and the story now being pieced together of its owner's last hours, offers the tantalising prospect that archaeological remains could harbour more ancient brain specimens than thought. If that's the case, it potentially opens the way to studying the health of the brain in prehistoric times.

Brain tissue is rich in enzymes that cause cells to break down rapidly after death, but this process can be halted if conditions are right. For instance, brain tissue has been found in the perfectly preserved body of an Inca child sacrificed 500 years ago. In this case, death occurred at the top of an Andean mountain where the body swiftly froze, preserving the brain.

 

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