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Why was Stonehenge built? The eight most popular theories - Telegraph

Why was Stonehenge built? The eight most popular theories - Telegraph | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Was it a spiritual temple, burial ground or even built by aliens? There are many theories about Stonehenge's purpose but here are the most popular ones.
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Signs of sailors: Ship graffiti in medieval churches

Signs of sailors: Ship graffiti in medieval churches | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Graffiti images of sailing ships are to be found on many coastal and inland English medieval parish church walls
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Neanderthals buried their dead in Western Europe

Neanderthals buried their dead in Western Europe | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A twelve year study has concluded that Neanderthals buried their dead, long before contact with Anatomically Modern Humans
David Connolly's insight:

A story that need rereading a couple of times to fully understadn the implications - this is another (close) species to us and it seems to have independently gained similar cognitive beliefs and concepts of self and afterlife.   Which is pretty far out.   Is this part of what it is to be hominid?  rather than human?

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Cats lived alongside Chinese farmers 5,300 years ago

Cats lived alongside Chinese farmers 5,300 years ago | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Five thousand three hundred years ago cats were living alongside farmers in the ancient Chinese village of Quanhucun
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Lid lifted on 1600 year-old coffin | Leamington Observer

Lid lifted on 1600 year-old coffin | Leamington Observer | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

ARCHAEOLOGISTS are preparing to study in details the contents of a coffin believed to contain a Romano-British child.

The lid of the 1600 year-old coffin was lifted in Warwick this week after its recent discovery by metal-detectorist Chris Wright in a field close to the Warwickshire/Leicestershire border.

Archaeologists and scientists gathered at Warwickshire County Council's Archaeology department on Monday (November 11) for the opening, which to the untrained eye looked like it was full of mud, which had worked its way in through cracks in the lead-lined coffin down the centuries.


Read more: Lid lifted on 1600 year-old coffin | Leamington Observer
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Greece to Open Archaeological Diving Parks

Greece to Open Archaeological Diving Parks | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Located near Pylos in the south-western Peloponnese, the two parks will allow visitors to explore ancient shipwrecks and underwater archaeology.
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Ron Peters's curator insight, February 26, 2014 9:14 AM

New Archaeology Dive Site...

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Saving the murals of El Tajin

Saving the murals of El Tajin | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Delicate decorative murals at El Tajin were deteriorating due to salt and moisture problems. It has taken four years of work to stabilize the art
David Connolly's insight:

Delicate decorative murals that cover the walls, mouldings and cornices of Building I at the World Heritage Site of El Tajin, located in the Mexican state of Veracruz, and which constitute the most complete set preserved in situ within this archaeological complex, have been stabilized after four years of intensive work by specialists.

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New evidence challenges theories of Rapa Nui collapse

New evidence challenges theories of Rapa Nui collapse | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New evidence contests the popular narrative that the inhabitants of Rapa Nui committed environmental suicide
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Heritage hotel at Zubarah will attract tourists: expert

Heritage hotel at Zubarah will attract tourists: expert | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Establishing a heritage hotel in a controlled way in the hinterland of Al Zubarah Archaeological Site, the country’s first World Heritage Site, would help bring tourists to the area, an archaeology expert with Qatar Museums Authority (QMA) has suggested.

“The hotel, which could recreate to some extent, in a modern context, the architecture that was in Zubarah, would inspire tourists to spend more time,” Prof Thomas Leisten, chief officer of Archaeology, Architectural Conservation and Cultural Tourism Department, told Gulf Times.

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Terracotta Warriors Inspired by Ancient Greek Art : DNews

Terracotta Warriors Inspired by Ancient Greek Art : DNews | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Terracotta Warriors, along with other life-size sculptures built for the First Emperor of China, were inspired by Greek art, new research indicates.
David Connolly's insight:

The Terracotta Warriors, along with other life-size sculptures built for the First Emperor of China, were inspired by Greek art, new research indicates.

About 8,000 Terracotta Warriors, which are life-size statues of infantryman, cavalry, archers, charioteers and generals, were buried in three pits less than a mile to the northeast of the mausoleum of Qin Shi Huangdi, the first emperor. He unified the country through conquest more than 2,200 years ago. Pits containing sculptures of acrobats, strongmen, dancers and civil servants have also been found near the mausoleum.

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Cyprus was very much part of Neolithic revolution

Cyprus was very much part of Neolithic revolution | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Artefacts found at an archaeological site in Cyprus support a new theory that humans occupied the  Mediterranean island about 1,000 years earlier than previously believed – a discovery that fills an important gap in Cypriot history.

Excavations at Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos (AVA) by archaeologists from the University of Toronto, Cornell University and the University of Cyprus have uncovered, among other objects, the earliest complete human figurine on the island. The site has been carbon-dated to between 8800-8600 BC, near the beginning of the Neolithic Period when the transition from hunting to farming economies was occurring throughout the Middle East.

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Bobby Savoy's curator insight, January 16, 2014 6:58 PM

I don't find it hard to believe that Cypress was found farmed on earlier than we originally thought. Humans have always been adventurous, and the island-hopping theory is strengthened by this discovery.

Raymond McGee's curator insight, January 17, 2014 4:33 PM

I found this very intresting because of the new theory that people might have been there 1,000 years earlier than believed. In addition i leraned that hunting and farming throughout the middle east.

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Candi controversy: Bulldozing 1,000 years of history - Nation | The Star Online

Candi controversy: Bulldozing 1,000 years of history - Nation | The Star Online | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: LEMBAH BUJANG: This is history destroyed in front of our eyes. History destroyed forever, says an emotional Datuk V. Nadarajan, chairman of the Bujang Valley Study Circle non-governmental organisation.
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Columbus Ships nearing Biloxi | Living | The Sun Herald

Columbus Ships nearing Biloxi | Living | The Sun Herald | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Now is your chance to step aboard living history at the Schooner Pier Complex of the Maritime & Seafood Industry Museum in Biloxi. On Thursday, replicas of Christopher Columbus' ships, the Pinta and the Nina, will open for tours.
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Frustrated St Neots archaeologist's message from 1961 - 'I hate bones'

Frustrated St Neots archaeologist's message from 1961 - 'I hate bones' | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A museum has found a funny bone in its collections.
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Storms could reveal new archaeology

Storms could reveal new archaeology | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
David Connolly's insight:

he recent storms that hit the Scottish coastline could reveal important new archaeological sites, according to Fife scientists.

St Andrews University archaeologists are appealing to the public to help find sites that have been uncovered by the storms.

They also hoping people contact them to record local sites that have been damaged by the recent bad weather.

Scotland has been badly damaged by wind and rain over the last two weeks.

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Before Stonehenge - did this man lord it over Wiltshire's sacred landscape?

Before Stonehenge - did this man lord it over Wiltshire's sacred landscape? | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have just completed the most detailed study ever carried out of the life story of a prehistoric Briton.
David Connolly's insight:

What they have discovered sheds remarkable new light on the people who, some 5500 years ago, were building the great ritual monuments of what would become the sacred landscape of Stonehenge.

A leading forensic specialist has also used that prehistoric Briton's skull to produce the most life-like, and arguably the most accurate, reconstruction of a specific individual's face from British prehistory.

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Flying above jungle canopy to spot Maya ruins

Flying above jungle canopy to spot Maya ruins | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Testing whether a camera carried aloft by a tiny, battery-powered helicopter might one day help uncover lost Maya ruins
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Wars of the Roses bodies found in Queens Hotel near Harlech Castle

Wars of the Roses bodies found in Queens Hotel near Harlech Castle | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists believe three bodies found in the grounds of Harlech's old Queen's Hotel date from the days when the castle was almost permanently under siege
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Archaeologists return to controversial Vero site in Florida

Archaeologists return to controversial Vero site in Florida | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Excavation of one of the most important Ice Age sites in North America – the Old Vero Man site in Florida, is expected to begin in January 2014
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient city of Laodicea attracts visitors from all over the world

ARCHAEOLOGY - Ancient city of Laodicea attracts visitors from all over the world | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
One of the largest ancient cities Laodicea received more than 80,000 visitors
David Connolly's insight:

The ancient city of Laodicea, which was established in 3 B.C. in the western province of Denizli and was one of the largest cities in Anatolia, welcomes 83,526 people in the first 11 months of the year. This figure is expected to reach 100,000 by the end of the year. 

With a protocol signed between the Culture and Tourism Ministry and Denizli Municipality, the ancient city was transferred to the Denizli Municipality on Aug. 19, 2008, and works have been continuing since then.

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The ‘Why’ of Archaeology vs Selling History. - The Armchair Marcaeologist

The ‘Why’ of Archaeology vs Selling History. - The Armchair Marcaeologist | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Even Heinrich Schliemann who ploughed through seven layers of historic cities unsuccessfully looking for Troy; the classic treasure hunter masquerading as a scientist, is spinning in his grave.
What American Diggers from Nat Geo are featuring is a bunch of guys with metal detectors ripping the pages out of the master book of the archaeological record.

 

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4.4 million year old horse helps understand hominin habitat

4.4 million year old horse helps understand hominin habitat | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Two teams of researchers have announced the discovery of a new species of fossil horse from 4.4 million-year-old deposits in Ethiopia
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ARCHAEOLOGY - Leopard figure on ancient city walls

ARCHAEOLOGY - Leopard figure on ancient city walls | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Researchers working at the ancient city of Tripolis in Denizli have discovered the figure of a leopard on the wall of a shop that was located next to the market area.
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Vikingeskibsmuseet Roskilde: The Viking ships survived the storm

Vikingeskibsmuseet Roskilde: The Viking ships survived the storm | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
David Connolly's insight:

After some dramatic days at the Viking Ship Museum in Roskilde, the water is now receding and it’s time to take stock and assess the damage after the storm and the extreme water levels in Roskilde Fjord.

In the days leading up to the storm, it became clear that the Viking Ship Museum was going to be at risk from the rising waters. Therefore, an early decision was made to barricade the lowest windows facing out to the fjord in an attempt to stop the waves and flotsam from breaking the glass, which would have allowed water to flood in to the Viking ships.

On Thursday, the Danish Emergency Management Agency, the Home Guard and Roskilde Fire Service provided men and materials and before the water began to rise, the Viking Ship Hall was protected with wooden boards and sandbags. In addition, emergency generators and pumps were also installed in the cellar. “It was enormously helpful that we got the weather forecast early on. It gave us some days to prepare ourselves for what was coming, so we could secure the ships before it all kicked off”, said Viking Ship Museum Director, Tinna Damgård-Sørensen. “When we look at the damage, it appears that it’s limited to the buildings and grounds”.

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ARCHAEOLOGY - Edirne Palace being revived once again

ARCHAEOLOGY - Edirne Palace being revived once again | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Edirne Palace, which served the Ottoman Empire until the 19th century, is undergoing works to reveal its architectural value
David Connolly's insight:

Edirne Palace in the northwestern province of Edirne, which served the Ottoman Empire until the 19th century, is undergoing works to reveal its architectural value and heritage. Professor Nurhan Atasoy carried out a 56-year-long research project on Istanbul’s Topkapı Palace, which served as the administration center and official resident of the Ottoman Empire for 380 years. She said that Edirne Palace was the second most important palace after Topkapı, in terms of historical significance.

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