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Cultural identity – Celtic and Anglo-Norman realms

Cultural identity – Celtic and Anglo-Norman realms | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A project investigating the work of medieval monk Jocelin of Furness is transforming what we know about past cultural identities in England’s north-west
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Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague - History

Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague - History | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
History Ancient Teeth Help Scientists Decode Plague History By using DNA extracted from the teeth of ancient victims, scientists determined that the strains of Yersinia pestis that caused the Plague of Justinian likely died out, and that the Black...
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Gabriel Rodriguez's curator insight, February 28, 11:30 PM

We live in a world so advanced we can look at teeth that are hundreds of years old and know there was a plague in that time period. That's something.

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A walk in the park – always chasing deer

A walk in the park – always chasing deer | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Scottish medieval deer parks project was an initiative started back in 2010 when Kevin Malloy was studying for a Masters at Stirling University
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The Oswestry Hillfort Pegasus stone

The Oswestry Hillfort Pegasus stone | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
While a rare bas relief carving is verified from the site of Old Oswestry Hillfort a number of housing developments are planned around the ancient monument - a campaign aims to protect the hillfort
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5500 year old Trefael stone reveals it secrets

5500 year old Trefael stone reveals it secrets | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A team of archaeologists from the Welsh Rock Art Organisation (WRAO) have been excavating a site known as Trefael and making exciting new discoveries
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Bones from human sacrifice at Tenochtitlan ceremonial complex

Bones from human sacrifice at Tenochtitlan ceremonial complex | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Examining the osteological evidence on the bones of human sacrifices found within the ceremonial complex of the great Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan
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Cynia Sapp's curator insight, January 27, 9:10 PM

This article was very disturbing but interesting. I didn't know that the early Aztecs were cannibals. And they ate the flesh of people as part of ceremonial purposes.

Joshua Lefkowitz's curator insight, February 14, 12:34 AM

people often forget that Mexico city was built on a fairly significant site for previous cultures. Their dark secrets are constantly being relieved to us. There obsession with sacrifice is fascinating to me as there are few other civilizations as advanced as theirs that involved such ritual brutality.

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The midwinter sunset alignment at Kintraw, Argyll – a response

The midwinter sunset alignment at Kintraw, Argyll – a response | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Euan MacKie lays out the archaeological evidence to support Alexander Thom’s theory concerning the archaeo-astronomical long alignment at the prehistoric site of Kintraw, West Scotland
David Connolly's insight:

One for the archaeo-astronomers.   and interesting debate begins.  and this is what is needed.   Discussion, debate and work on this often overlooked area of study.

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London skulls reveal gruesome evidence of Roman head hunters

London skulls reveal gruesome evidence of Roman head hunters | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Improved forensic techniques have shed new light on 39 skulls excavated near Museum of London in 1988
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Jossue Gallardo's curator insight, January 17, 10:18 PM

Its interesting becasue the ampitheater was used to keep crimnals in. And too see if these crimnals were once part of the Roman head hunters.

Rupert Makis's curator insight, January 27, 3:56 AM

Amazing find

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Rare gaming piece found at Anglo-Saxon royal hall

Rare gaming piece found at Anglo-Saxon royal hall | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Archaeologists have discovered an extremely rare Anglo-Saxon board gaming piece while excavating a royal complex at Lyminge in South England
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Ancient Greeks Used Portable Grills at Their Picnics

Ancient Greeks Used Portable Grills at Their Picnics | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The ancient Mycenaeans inspired Homer's "Odyssey" and "Iliad," and perhaps Greek cooking, too. More than 3,000 years ago, they used portable grill pits and non-stick pans to make souvlaki and bread, new cooking experiments suggest.
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Race to excavate Alaskan village falling into sea

Race to excavate Alaskan village falling into sea | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A race to save one of the world’s best preserved examples of a lost society has been boosted by a major £1million research grant. The dig in western Alaska is revealing never seen before artefacts as well as providing clues to how past societies dealt with climate change and how global warming could affect us in the future.

Residents of the Yup’ik Eskimo village of Quinhagak first called in archaeologists from the University of Aberdeen in 2009 to carry out a rescue dig after observing their coastline being washed away as a consequence of global warming. Within hours of beginning, the team, working alongside local archaeologists, located a 700-year-old village site which was falling into the sea.

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Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations

Searching for the Amazon's Hidden Civilizations | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Statistical model predicts signs of agriculture in the rainforest
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articles/Egyptian pharaohs tomb discovered by American archaeologists

articles/Egyptian pharaohs tomb discovered by American archaeologists | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The tomb of the Egyptian pharaoh King Sobekhotep I, believed to be first king of the 13th Dynasty (1781BC-1650BC), has been discovered by a team from the University of Pennsylvania at Abydos in Middle Egypt, 500km south of Cairo.

Since new royal tombs are rarely discovered, and as only ten from the 13th Dynasty are known—all at Dahshur, just south of Cairo—this is an important find. King Sobekhotep I ruled for only about three years, at a time when Egypt was entering a period of decline. In fact, the chronological evidence for this period is so complex that scholars are still debating the order of the 13th Dynasty kings.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, January 8, 11:39 AM

Major discoveries are fairly rare and especially for this Dynasty. It is important to not that even though major discoveries are rare two have been found this month.  Often workers spend years if not decades on one site excavating and seeing what all is present.

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Discovery of a maiden crown in Roskilde Cathedral burial

Discovery of a maiden crown in Roskilde Cathedral burial | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A 17th century Danish noblewoman had been buried with her head resting on a pillow sewn with gold threads and her maiden crown
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Ancient Egyptian ruins of what was once a bustling barracks and port unearthed ... - Daily Mail

Ancient Egyptian ruins of what was once a bustling barracks and port unearthed ... - Daily Mail | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
Ancient Egyptian ruins of what was once a bustling barracks and port unearthed ...
Daily Mail
Archaeologists have discovered evidence of what is believed to be ancient barracks, pictured, close to the site of a port near Giza in Egypt.
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Evidence of European Sea Peoples in Jordan Valley

Evidence of European Sea Peoples in Jordan Valley | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
New finds support the theory that groups of the so-called Sea Peoples emigrated to Tell Abu al-Kharaz in the Jordan Valley
David Connolly's insight:

Swedish archaeologists in Jordan led by Professor Peter M. Fischer from the University of Gothenburg have excavated a nearly 60-metre long well-preserved building from 1100 B.C. in the ancient settlement Tell Abu al-Kharaz. The building is from an era characterised by major migration.

New finds support the theory that groups of the so-called Sea Peoples emigrated to Tell Abu al-Kharaz. They derive from Southern or Eastern Europe and settled in the Eastern Mediterranean region all the way to the Jordan Valley.

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Greek archaeologists reject call for private firms to manage ancient sites

Greek archaeologists reject call for private firms to manage ancient sites | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

The Association of Greek Archaeologists issued a statement on Monday following the publication of a Time magazine article in which American archaeologist Stephen Miller, who has spent more than three decades in Greece helping unearth antiquities at Ancient Nemea, suggested allowing private companies take over the development, promotion and security of under-used sites.

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Mighty Viking ‘war machine’ takes shape for British Museum...

Mighty Viking ‘war machine’ takes shape for British Museum... | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Eleventh-century warship, Roskilde VI, is under reconstruction to take centre stage at biggest Viking exhibition in a generation
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Well preserved Iron Age village uncovered in Denmark

Well preserved Iron Age village uncovered in Denmark | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A well-preserved Iron Age village found in Northern Denmark includes a number of houses complete with fireplaces, chalk floors and cobbled paving
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Ted Cochran's curator insight, January 17, 5:03 PM
Totally related to the discussion board about cities and evolution of them.
Elizabeth Otis's curator insight, January 17, 6:34 PM

I though it was very interesting how this was newly discovered and I was just learning about houses that used to be bult underground. I gess it was a common tactic to help keep the people warm during winter and cool during summer. 

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LiDAR and the Archaeology Revolution - GIS Lounge

LiDAR and the Archaeology Revolution - GIS Lounge | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
Changes in how archaeologists study the past are being brought about by advances in LiDAR technology. Through the use of LiDAR, archaeologists are now able to uncover more of the ‘lost’ New England of subsistence farming from the 1700s.
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The chemistry of rock-art

The chemistry of rock-art | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A team of researchers have analysed two examples of rock-art from shelters in Spain; one from the Palaeolithic and one from the Neolithic
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Cynia Sapp's curator insight, January 27, 9:13 PM

Science and History are connected when it comes to this Ancient Cave Painting.

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Understanding the founding city of the Khmer kingdom

Understanding the founding city of the Khmer kingdom | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
The Khmer kingdom was founded in 802 by king Jayavarman II in a city called Mahandraparvata, which is now undergoing more extensive research
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Catalhoyuk mural may depict ancient volcanic eruption

Catalhoyuk mural may depict ancient volcanic eruption | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

A mural excavated at the Neolithic Çatalhöyük site (Central Anatolia, Turkey) has been interpreted as the oldest known map. Dating to 6600 BCE, it putatively depicts an explosive summit eruption of the Hasan Dağı twin-peaks volcano located 130 km northeast of Çatalhöyük, with a birds-eye view of a town plan in the foreground.

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Manning the ramparts: a hillfort on the edge of Empire

Manning the ramparts: a hillfort on the edge of Empire | Archaeology News | Scoop.it

Investigation of a lost Iron-Age hillfort in Southern Scotland led to the discovery of a large defensive ditch, constructed during the Pictish Wars

In 2012, a team from Rampart Scotland carried out an archaeological investigation at Sheriffside, a large crop mark site some 20 miles to the east of Edinburgh. Unexpectedly, a ditch measuring over 8m across and up to 2.80m deep was uncovered, which appears to represent the final phase of enclosure of the hillfort. Currently, this is the largest ditch discovered in the region and has produced a C14 date range of AD 211-384.

Archaeologically, this date range and re-cutting of the ditch is extremely interesting, as it falls into a turbulent era in the history of Southern Scotland. After the Romans withdrew behind Hadrian’s Wall in the early 3rd century AD, the Picts carried out frequent raids and may have forced the local tribes such as the Votadini into taking defensive action to protect themselves and their livestock.

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Understanding the Palace of Nestor Throne Room floor

Understanding the Palace of Nestor Throne Room floor | Archaeology News | Scoop.it
A painted floor at the Palace of Nestor was a physical hybrid of cloth and stone and also drew a visitor's eyes and footsteps toward the throne
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