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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Will Puerto Rico Become The New Cuba In Florida In The 2016 Election? - NewZwolf.com

Will Puerto Rico Become The New Cuba In Florida In The 2016 Election? - NewZwolf.com | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Puerto Ricans will pass Cubans as the largest Latino group in Florida in the coming years. But will the issue of the island becoming the 51st state mobilize Puerto Ricans in the key swing state in 2016?

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The World Is Becoming A Better Place

The World Is Becoming A Better Place | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"People who love to complain about how horrible everything is also love to point out that the world is always changing — and change is of course always horrible, because it destroys the way things used to be. It's easy to get depressed by all the 'everything is horrible' talk.  So it's nice to sometimes remind ourselves that some things — many things, in fact — are getting better all the time."


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Beth Marinucci's curator insight, November 12, 2014 5:49 AM

Some good news . . .

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 19, 2014 5:10 PM

It is easy to talk about all the things that are wrong with the world today. It is a nice change in pace posting about something good going on in the world for once. Covering all regions of the world, this article is about how the world is becoming a better place. Thank god. Looking at the annual death because of battle, it is clear to see that the world is in fact, getting better. There are less deaths, which in turn also mean that there are less battles going on in the world. Poverty rate has also gone way down in the past couple of years. Even though there is still a huge amount of poverty, it has been getting better throughout the years. Another chart presented along with many other, was the life expectancy rate going through the roof. The best example is China, having their life expectancy at age 30 in the 1960's to age 75 now. There is still much room for improvement in the world such as disease, poverty, and climate changes, but this article makes me worry a little less about our world today.   

Aleena Reyes's curator insight, January 22, 6:50 PM

This is something I knew to be true but felt distant towards because outlets like American news sources are always focused on the bad. Why is that? It seems American to be fearful and instill fear.

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Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future?

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


Via Kyle M Norton, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2012 11:55 PM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
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7 awful conflicts that were under-reported in 2014

7 awful conflicts that were under-reported in 2014 | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sadly, there was plenty of mayhem and violence that didn't make newspaper frontpages. Here are some awful conflicts that merited more attention.

 

Tags: conflict,  Libya, Yemen, Assam (India), the Sudans, Nigeria, Pakistan, Somalia and Kenya. 


Via Seth Dixon, Dustin Fowler
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:14 PM

Current events, course resource, could be applied to just about every unit!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 9, 9:36 PM

This article struck me because of certain topics overshadowing really important ones. This talks about seven horrible conflicts and tragedies that have occurred that went unreported. These issues needed attention and media this day in age is focuses on unnecessary issues rather than discussing issues like these. One of the conflicts was in Pakistan. They experienced a terrorist attack on a school by the Taliban and many children were slaughtered and many of those children were the kids of military personnel. This has been an ongoing conflict and has even had numerous airstrikes involved. This terrorist outbreak has caused more problems and the fighting still continues. A second conflict is in Assam, India. This conflict has been a clash of between ethic groups. This conflict has gotten so bad, numerous people have left their homes and people have been massacred causing it to become a terrorist operation. Conflicts like these need our intention and there are way too many cases like this going unnoticed. 

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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:57 PM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:12 PM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:58 PM

Somalia, or as we referred to it last class "a country that is not really a country".  Somalia is famous for being a fractured, failing state.  The American war film, "Black Hawk Down" is set in Mogadishu and shows the country even in the 1990s fracturing apart under the influence of various warlords.  The movie was based on an actual event that occurred in the early nineties, in which the US tried to oust a large scale crime boss, supposedly to stabilize the nation, however this plan failed, as the nation continued to be fractured.  This article claims that there is progress being made in the country (Circa 2013) as the pro-"government" forces and a coalition for African security pushed back a terrorist group out of the capital and back to their stronghold in the country.  During 2012, the terrorist group lost its last stronghold.  However, Somalia still has a great deal of challenges facing it.  Al Shabbab is not fully eliminated, just weakened.  The pirates still exist on the Somalia coast, and trying to recreate a country out of something that hasn't existed as one for decades will be difficult.  However, I am pulling for the nation to succeed, the people in the region need stability.

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Guns, Germs & Steel

Guns, Germs & Steel | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

This video (like the book with the same title) explores the course of human history to find the geographic factors that can help to explain the global inequalities between societies. Jared Diamond’s answer lies in the military strength (guns), superior pathogens (germs) and industrial production (steel) that agricultural societies were able to develop as the critical advantages over hunter/gatherer societies. The raw materials at the disposal of the societies inhabiting particular environments partially explain the economic possibilities before them. Diamond hypothesizes that the orientations of the continents play a critical role in the relative advantages among agricultural societies (East-West orientations allow for greater diffusion of agricultural technologies than North-South orientations since the growing seasons and ecology are more compatible), giving Eurasia an advantage over Africa and the Americas. The Fertile Crescent had native plant and animal species ideal for domestication, which then diffused to Europe. Societies that have more developed animal husbandry develop a resistance to more powerful germs. Consequently, when two societies come in contact those with the best resistance to the worse diseases are more successful. Similarly, industrial production depends on an agricultural surplus since specialization requires that some workers not needing to produce their own food to work on technological innovations. Societies that had agricultural advantages were able to invest in technologies (primarily steel) that would enhance their advantages over other societies, as seen during colonization. Societies that had the best environments had access to large plant eating mammals suitable for domestication and the most productive grains would be poised to produce more dangerous guns, germs and steel—the key resources for economic dominion resulting in global inequalities.


Diamond’s critics argue that the ‘geography hypothesis’ is environmental determinism that does not properly value human choices into the equation. Still, the core of this book is the search for connections between the themes of Geography with a spatial framework and the video is available via Netflix, public libraries and many other outlets.


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Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:16 PM

I found this just browsing the suggestions, and I was like "Whoa! We learned this in class!" So I thought that it was really neat. 

Diamond's theory is an example of environmental determinism, because he claimed that the environment and where people lived affected the people, and that's why not everybody is equal. 

I personally agree with his theory, because it makes a lot of sense when I watched the movie/episodes.

             I believe in enviromental determinism but not to the extreme level, for example if someone is from a hot place they are lazy. I believe that people have choices and can pave their own way but the enviroment can limit them. This would for sure help future aphug students because it introduces human geography in the world history context.