INTRODUCTION TO T...
Follow
Find tag "socialmedia"
809 views | +0 today
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 2, 9:50 AM

The hijab is an incredibly complex cultural artifact full of social meanings all over the political spectrum.  This poster shows some of the social pressures exerted on women in Iran to wear the hijab.  This poster comes from Iran where the government is using this platform to encourage traditional values and gendered norms using a chocolate bar/candy analogy.  This poster struck a nerve on social media throughout the Middle East in part because blends some modern cultural diffusion elements with some older folk traditions.  Many hijab-wearing women don't want other women to be shamed into conforming, and many women wear it the hijab in public, but privately subvert the cultural norms on social media.  What stereotypes and perspectives are embodied in this poster?  Why do you think this poster was seen as inflammatory or culturally insensitive by many?  This image would be a great discussion starter for cultural  patterns and process as well as the geography of the Middle East. 


TagsIran, gender, MiddleEast, Islamreligion, culture, social media.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:18 AM

unit 3 and 6 Why is this viewed as inflammatory by some?

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 10:07 AM

Interesting discussion

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who's using mobile maps and check-ins

Who's using mobile maps and check-ins | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
According to a new survey from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, three-quarters of U.S.

 

Smartphones have built-in location features with a host of apps that can be added.  However, 1  in 4 smartphone users do not use these features at all.  Age, ethnicity, education and gender (or more simply, demographic factors) play a major role.  Which groups would you imagine use geo-location features more or less?  Why? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:30 PM

 I would imagine that the group that would use less geo-location features could be the older crowd, probably because they might not know to use it; for example my mother’ we recently bought her a new iPhone. she only know the basic call, text and taking picture , I been trying to get her to use her phone as a GPS but she won’t budge in. when I asked her how do she feel about  letting other people know where she is (check in Facebook) she thinks is crazy because she like her privacy.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire

The sun never sets... on the Facebook Empire | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
How Facebook connections mirror old empires EIGHT years ago Facebook launched as an online social network connecting a small college community from a dorm room at Harvard University.

 

These graphics show how in a post-colonial world, former colonies are still socially intertwined in a cultural network that mirrors the empires of yesteryear. Why are these modern social networks so similar to imperial patterns? What economic explanations are there for these patterns? What is the cultural impact?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 29, 11:38 AM

How fb has made physical distance obsolete, connecting cultures to different cultures on a global scale.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Techy Stuff
Scoop.it!

An Amazing Timeline Chronicling The History of Social Media

An Amazing Timeline Chronicling The History of Social Media | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Susan Bainbridge, Patty Ball
more...
Emma Stutzman's curator insight, January 3, 2:03 PM

This picture shows how social media has developed over the years. It mentions how many people thought that social media was started with facebook, when in reality it was really started by other projects that you can see above. This picture/concept shows the differences between which sites took off and which didn't, depending on our cultural preferences.

Mhd.Shadi Khudr's curator insight, January 15, 12:05 PM


Many thanks to Roula Haj-Ismail:

@roula haj-ismail

 

Catherine Pascal's curator insight, February 28, 9:08 AM

  YES infographie : synthèse social média.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan

How tiny Estonia stepped out of USSR's shadow to become an internet titan | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The European country where Skype was born made a conscious decision to embrace the web after shaking off Soviet shackles Eesti keel | Estonian language version...

 

Can you imagine walking over 100 miles without losing your internet connection?  Estonia has done it by making internet access a public service along the lines of water and electricity.  The impacts and effects or profound considering that 9 in 10 Estonians have a computerized ID card that they can use to vote, transfer money and access all the information the state has on them.  Although this may sound very dystopian and authoritarian to many, Estonians argue that it actually empowers citizens to keep the state in check.      


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 11, 2012 11:03 PM

I actually like the idea of the computerized ID card.  Yes, undoubtedly from the outside looking in this does appear to have some big brother qualities but I think it's brilliant.  The card allows people to transfer money and vote.  It's also nice to see a country that doesn't just treat their internet use like a toy.  They use it to benefit their society, making it accessible to everyone in the country and not just those who can afford it. 

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:43 AM

Just an amazing fact to see a county that was once under the controll of the USSR for so long as come so far.  Now a part of NATO and the EU Estonia has stepped out of the control of Russia to become a virbrant place to live.  Once independant and then under the contol of the USSR at the start of WW II it has once again become a nation itself.  Also notice a very different view in the article, the people there feel this electronic system lets them keep and eye on the government and not a big brother view many people in the US have over electronic ID systems.  Is it because they have always been use to being looked at by the government, ie the USSR over the last 50 years and because we are so use to freedoms that we have had for hundreds of years?

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:04 AM

I actually had no idea that Estonia birthed Skype. It was an amazing foresight that Estonia immediately jumped into the computer and internet age, and even more surprising that you can get Wi-fi across most of the country, no matter how remote. That's something that hasn't been accomplished in even the US. They had Internet in most schools by 1997 and can even vote online!