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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System?

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"After growing by leaps and bounds for more than three decades, China’s economic growth has come to a halt, falling from around 12 percent in the second quarter of 2006 to 7.6 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Export-dependent manufacturing sector has been hard hit. The June HSBC Flash Purchasing Managers Index hit a seven-month low of 48.1, down from a final reading of 48.4 in May, the eighth consecutive month that the index has been below 50—the contraction threshold. Is this just a temporary pause, caused by a prolonged slow-down in the world economy or something more serious?"


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Graham Mulligan's comment, March 14, 2013 12:32 PM
I think the flag icon needs to be changed.
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Controversies in Globalization

Controversies in Globalization | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Olympic committee and designer came under withering criticism for manufacturing the garments in China.

 

Two current controversies (Team USA clothing being made in China and Mitt Romney's potential involvement as Bain outsourced jobs) are fundamentally about what Americans think about globalization and the impact of globalization on the United States.  Globalization is most certainly a mixed bag at every scale.  What is intriguing about these controversies is that most Americans see themselves as net 'victims' of globalization, while many people outside the United States would view the United States as an overwhelming beneficiary of the economic and cultural processes that are collectively called globalization.  So what is it?  Do Americans just want to have their cake and eat it too?  Can a country only embrace the beneficial elements of globalization without accepting that negatives  inherently will come with them as a package deal?  How can a country (or the world, individual) maximize the advantages of globalization while minimizing the negatives?     


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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  


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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
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A Tit for Tat: A Spratly Island Spat!

If you haven't yet discovered http://www.plaidavenger.com/ I recommend exploring it (numerous World Regional resources). You'll find its brand of geography has a whole lot of personality; you'll decide soon enough whether that personality works for your classroom.  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on political geography, the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), and the strategic importance of overseas exclaves using the Spratly Island example in the South China Sea.

Minor correction to video: Territorial waters only extend 12 miles offshore, not the 200 miles of the exclusive economic zone. 


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Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:54 PM

The conflict over the Spratly Islands is similar to the more current dipute between Japan and China over similar rocks. The rocks are not desired, however, for their land value but for their potential for oil, and exclusive economic zone-ability. The Spratly Islands are clearly closest to the  Philippenes (in my opinion) but that doesn't make it simple. Perhaps in the future islnds like these will have no claim over them, and revert to international territory?

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 10:01 PM

Depending on what age group and what grade level you're teaching this may or may not be the right video to use. I personally think he's funny yet informational. I would like to use this in a classroom of middle schoolers. Obviously this plaid cast wouldn't be appropriate for first or second graders, but it has potential for other grade levels.

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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.

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Jerod Garland's curator insight, October 2, 2013 2:06 PM

Many other countries complain about the US getting into things that aren't our business, but what I've noticed, if we don't intervene, it does  become our problem because of all the ties we have around the world. One place fights another because they think something isn't going their way. But if one place goes down, there is other places that rely on the place that just fell. Then it becomes a butterfly effect and more people are affected than intended.

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:57 PM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:12 PM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

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The Disputed Spratly Islands

link to part 2 http://youtu.be/I5t9wpEzKRc or http://youtu.be/myNxTaW5z3w link to part 3 http://youtu.be/7mJK4Sgxrbw...

 

This video clip shows the historical background of the political and economic factors that have lead to competing claims in the South China Sea.  The Exclusive conomic Zone (EEZ) with projected oil fields is the main prize and China has been flexing it's regional muscles. 


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 9, 2012 10:28 AM
An interesting project, that may cause a great deal of problems in the future I would hope that the resolution can come peacfully and quickly
Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 2:09 PM
I didn't realize there was a conflict in the South China Sea between these Asian countries until this project was presented. I learned a great deal from the points and information relayed through this project. It is a great issue between these countries because the ocean provides a huge source of income for these countries and fighting for it is important for these countries.
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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm


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Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:22 PM
The Coca-Cola company has become an American Icon that speaks the universal language and trade of many. With many manufacturing facilities around the globe, Coca-Cola will continue to network the world, connecting every country to each other.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:42 PM

This was an interesting but short article.  It is interesting to realize that Coke is sold almost universally worldwide with just a few exceptions.  It is truly the poster boy for globalization.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

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US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005

US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005 | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005...

 

This interactive graph is not visually intuitive and easy to interpret, but it is a wealth of information about the United States geopolitical policies throughout time in addition to it's humanitarian aid throughout the developing world.  For example, you can see that the aid to Vietnam from 1965-1973 exploded, and to Israel from 1976-2002.  In 1947, the United Kingdom (under the Marshall Plan) accounted for over half of all of the international aid.   


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:05 PM

In this graph it shows the US foreign aid over time from 1946-2005. In this diagram it shows the difference in 1965-1973 from Vietnam sky rocketed and the same thing happened in '76-2002 in Israel.  But the Marshall plan once enacted helped the UK people and other nations.