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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments

Cultural Meaning in Moving Monuments | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Ever since I researched the meanings of monuments in the cultural landscape in Mexico City, I’ve been fascinated by the cultural politics of memory and heritage. The removal of a statue is a cultural 180, acknowledging what was once honored and revered is now something that is not worthy of that distinction. This sort of change is not without protests on both sides and a cultural rearticulation of who 'we' are when 'we' make a public memorial."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 14, 7:40 PM

Cecil Rhodes was the namesake for the Rhodes scholarship at Oxford University and the colonial names of Zambia (Northern Rhodesia) and Zimbabwe (Southern Rhodesia).  He was deeply connected to British colonialism and was one of the most ambitious colonizers that expanded the British Empire.  This week a statue of Cecil Rhodes on the University of Cape Town campus was removed.  See the BBC article, Yahoo News!, and PRI podcastfor more details


Questions to Ponder: Why do you think this monument to Cecil Rhodes was established in 1934?  Why was it removed in 2015?  What does this say about South African politics and culture?  How might we characterize the supporters and opponents of the statue?


Tags: South Africa, Africa, historical, colonialism, political, landscape.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, April 14, 7:52 PM

I have been to South Africa. The country is very still divided in many ways. My question is do our American students even know the history and geography of Africa? Do they know how the Europeans partitioned the continent ( divvied it up and laid claim to regions ) and that they did this across tribal lands to cause difficulty.

 

I understand the Rhodes scholarship, but it would be good for students and teachers to have ideationa scaffolding to understand the problems of today caused by practices of yesterday.

Rob Duke's curator insight, April 14, 9:41 PM

There's a lesson here in the symbols of conflict resolution....what symbolic monuments do we have to move to solve social conflicts?

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Conflict Kitchen serves up controversy

Conflict Kitchen serves up controversy | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Conflict Kitchen is an art project based in the centre of Pittsburgh which serves food from countries with which the US is 'in conflict'.  The founders get to define what conflict means - it can range from outright war to economic sanctions - and since opening in 2010 they have prepared food from Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea, Venezuela and Cuba.  But the restaurant's latest choice of cuisine, Palestinian food, has caused controversy in the city and even led to a death threat which temporarily closed the venue.  Critics pointed out that the US is not in conflict with the Palestinian people. They claimed that the pamphlets served with the dishes included 'anti-Israel' propaganda. But Conflict Kitchen's founders said the project was designed to encourage debate among Americans."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2014 5:20 PM

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the purpose of Conflict Kitchen is for the restaurant owners?  Many people choose restaurants for a cultural experience; what type of cultural experiences are these patrons searching for by eating at Conflict Kitchen?  What political overtones are there to these cultural encounters?  Is this a form of 'gastro-diplomacy?' 


Tags: foodpolitical, culture.

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Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:45 PM

When it comes to deportation, its usually a loss win situation. But in the case of Mexicans who once lived a life on US soil from since birth and having been deported later on in life, adjusting to a new life in a new world is challenging. The comfort of being able to work in an environment that reminds them of being back home eliviates the agony of being separated from their family back in the US. The outsourced phone companies give these deported individual an opportunity to be able to participate in a life they once lived by being able to interact with Americans. While they make subsequently less than what they were making in the states, the opportunity of being able to work in a foreign land is one that they are forever grateful for.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:49 PM

This article is similar to the topic of outsourcing jobs to the United states, only it is the reverse, with deportees being giving jobs at call centers in the city of Tijuana. It brings up the topic of culture shock and the differences between Mexican and United States Economies.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 3:33 PM

Brings to mind the whole debate over over illegals vs. legals, work visas and work permits, political change and citizenship. So many factors are present in the decisions these Mexican born, living in America, deported back to their home country, must make. How culturally shocking it must be to be living the American Dream in an area that is bi-lingual, San Diego, and be deported back to Tijuana, making $150 a week.

It's a blessing and a curse for both sides of the border. The USA loses tax revenue from the money Henry was bringing in while working in real estate, conversely Mexico gains a smaller slice of the tax given his drop in pay. He clearly was happy and productive here, but others such as the gang member mentioned, may make the USA happier by taking his gang affiliation with him. Not good for Mexico, but perhaps he can make a fresh start in that country.

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System?

Can a Communist Party Nurture a Modern Capitalist System? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"After growing by leaps and bounds for more than three decades, China’s economic growth has come to a halt, falling from around 12 percent in the second quarter of 2006 to 7.6 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Export-dependent manufacturing sector has been hard hit. The June HSBC Flash Purchasing Managers Index hit a seven-month low of 48.1, down from a final reading of 48.4 in May, the eighth consecutive month that the index has been below 50—the contraction threshold. Is this just a temporary pause, caused by a prolonged slow-down in the world economy or something more serious?"


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Graham Mulligan's comment, March 14, 2013 12:32 PM
I think the flag icon needs to be changed.
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Controversies in Globalization

Controversies in Globalization | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The Olympic committee and designer came under withering criticism for manufacturing the garments in China.

 

Two current controversies (Team USA clothing being made in China and Mitt Romney's potential involvement as Bain outsourced jobs) are fundamentally about what Americans think about globalization and the impact of globalization on the United States.  Globalization is most certainly a mixed bag at every scale.  What is intriguing about these controversies is that most Americans see themselves as net 'victims' of globalization, while many people outside the United States would view the United States as an overwhelming beneficiary of the economic and cultural processes that are collectively called globalization.  So what is it?  Do Americans just want to have their cake and eat it too?  Can a country only embrace the beneficial elements of globalization without accepting that negatives  inherently will come with them as a package deal?  How can a country (or the world, individual) maximize the advantages of globalization while minimizing the negatives?     


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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  


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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 2014 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
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A Tit for Tat: A Spratly Island Spat!

If you haven't yet discovered http://www.plaidavenger.com/ I recommend exploring it (numerous World Regional resources). You'll find its brand of geography has a whole lot of personality; you'll decide soon enough whether that personality works for your classroom.  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on political geography, the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ), and the strategic importance of overseas exclaves using the Spratly Island example in the South China Sea.

Minor correction to video: Territorial waters only extend 12 miles offshore, not the 200 miles of the exclusive economic zone. 


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 10:01 PM

Depending on what age group and what grade level you're teaching this may or may not be the right video to use. I personally think he's funny yet informational. I would like to use this in a classroom of middle schoolers. Obviously this plaid cast wouldn't be appropriate for first or second graders, but it has potential for other grade levels.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:30 PM

This is definitely an interesting tool to use in the classroom. But it also gives the viewer an animated expression of geographic topics. The EEZ that make countries fight over small useless islands because it allows for access to profitable seas. I like this goofy host and the way he takes on serious topics in a way that makes them engaging for people who would otherwise be bored when just reading about it in a text book.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 8:08 PM

I truly believe that if a World War III erupts, it will solely be the fault of China. China isn't contempt with the current land it possesses. As one of the world's super power, China is trying to expand its territory to become a holder of the global economy. Not solely on China, but countries that lie on the South China Sea are claiming the scattered island that lies in the middle of the sea. But the problem comes with the definition of how much land outside of a country can a country possess? If China were to possess this land, what would happen to all of the natives?

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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harrison babbitt's curator insight, February 1, 2:09 PM

this correlates with unit 4 political geography because it is showing a nation state.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

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Cultural Politics

Cultural Politics | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A state-by-state look at our cultural politics.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:23 PM

While this doesn't say everything about the state of cultural politics in the United States, it does lay out some of the more ideologically charged debates in the new political landscape after the midterm electionsWhat does this Venn diagram say about the state of cultural politics in your state?   The Courts have aided the push for same sex marriages; will that also occur for marijuana legalization?


Tags: narcotics, sexuality, USA, electoral, political.

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The 9 biggest myths about ISIS

The 9 biggest myths about ISIS | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you want to understand the Islamic State, better known as ISIS, the first thing you have to know about them is that they are not crazy. Murderous adherents to a violent medieval ideology, sure. But not insane.

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:34 PM

ISIS has been all over the news for a long time now, and it doesn't seem to a be a topic that will leave us anytime soon. The media often depicts ISIS as an extremist, violent, half-crazed group of terrorists that are blindly spreading genocide in order to claim land. ISIS is actually incredibly organized and united under the purpose of creating their own state. We often but violence and extreme religious ideals hand and hand with insanity, but this group's strategic operations and rational movements prove this not to be true. Also, many people believe that fundamentalism refers to older traditions. In reality, radical Islam describes a form of Islam that never existed, where rules, traditions, and beliefs are magnified in a way that goes against the grain of the developing world. This often occurs out of fear of losing a religion, or a way of life. People are also worried about how ISIS will treat those living in its territories, but truth be told, they have already set up government programs in some areas. If ISIS is successful with its mission to create an autonomous Islamic state, then only time will tell if it will survive. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 14, 2:39 PM

This article does a good job helping the reader gain a more rounded perspective of ISIS, that is ISIS' rational. The writer feels it necessary for people to better understand ISIS' reasoning for its being so there are in turn no misjudgments formed about the terrorists. I knew the writer was in no way defending ISIS, rather giving an intellectual input on the matter to try and enhance everyones perspective. However, as contextual as it was, the writer truly needed to get across how crude/violent the movement truly is. Yes, understanding ISIS is important, it helps form a more precise explanation for their actions... but they are terrorists whom are exploiting the misfortune of a people (Sunni misrepresentation in a political setting) in order to form a society... which is ultimately founded on violence and acts that counter the true fundamentals and meaning of Islam. A less experienced reader could perceive this article as defending the reasoning(s)/rational of ISIS.

Personally, I find that there is rational behind every movement/terrorist factions/rebel actions, etc... There is usually a common goal, no matter how well-thought out and actions then occur in order to obtain this goal, no matter how well-thought out. Even Joseph Kony (at his height), rampaging through central Africa has a rational behind his actions-to disrupt villages/communities, gain profit in food and money, as well as abduct and dehumanize young children in order to make them fierce warriors, all these reasons ultimately support his main issue/goal, that being fighting government suppression. Horrible rational which leads to atrocities, yet no piece was written to help the world gain a better understanding of Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army. Because in either case they are terrorists...

Yes, understanding the enemy and how/why it functions the way it does is important. Yes, interpreting there rational is important. But this article truly fails to get across how ruthless and disturbed ISIS actually is. The writer states ISIS is basically doing what many rebel groups do when upset with the political setting... they rebel and try to form there own territory. Well, this is true, especially the political reasoning behind ISIS' actions and its existence (something the article does do a good job explaining) but the way ISIS goes about is non-comparable. Look at the Russian-backed separatists in the Eastern Ukraine. Both oppositions engaged in war fare. They aren't playing a game of hide and seek beheading civilians, torturing reporters, etc... all for political gains... ISIS are terrorists-of course they have a rational, of course they are smart, there predecessor "al-Qaeda" were smart too. Joseph Kony can be seen as smart... he hasn't gotten caught, thats smart isn't it? 

The article explains that them being smart and having a strong rational motive makes them dangerous. No kidding they are dangerous.

The article does a good job at educating people about ISIS yet it certainly teeters on the line of defending them. It gives reasoning behind there soulless attacks, scholars know the reasoning, they do not have to be written out in a quasi defense format like I believe this article does. "The end justifies the means" is the perspective of the Islamic State... it shouldn't be so for this writer!

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 9:04 PM

This may be a little off topic but with a President like Obama, how could America even try to stop ISIS alone?  That man has made a fool of our country!  I don't think ISIS would self-destruct on its own; it will continue to grow and become more powerful because people are afraid.

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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:57 PM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:12 PM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2:58 PM

Somalia, or as we referred to it last class "a country that is not really a country".  Somalia is famous for being a fractured, failing state.  The American war film, "Black Hawk Down" is set in Mogadishu and shows the country even in the 1990s fracturing apart under the influence of various warlords.  The movie was based on an actual event that occurred in the early nineties, in which the US tried to oust a large scale crime boss, supposedly to stabilize the nation, however this plan failed, as the nation continued to be fractured.  This article claims that there is progress being made in the country (Circa 2013) as the pro-"government" forces and a coalition for African security pushed back a terrorist group out of the capital and back to their stronghold in the country.  During 2012, the terrorist group lost its last stronghold.  However, Somalia still has a great deal of challenges facing it.  Al Shabbab is not fully eliminated, just weakened.  The pirates still exist on the Somalia coast, and trying to recreate a country out of something that hasn't existed as one for decades will be difficult.  However, I am pulling for the nation to succeed, the people in the region need stability.

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The Disputed Spratly Islands

link to part 2 http://youtu.be/I5t9wpEzKRc or http://youtu.be/myNxTaW5z3w link to part 3 http://youtu.be/7mJK4Sgxrbw...

 

This video clip shows the historical background of the political and economic factors that have lead to competing claims in the South China Sea.  The Exclusive conomic Zone (EEZ) with projected oil fields is the main prize and China has been flexing it's regional muscles. 

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Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations

Coca-Cola Returning To Myanmar; Now It Sells In All But 2 Nations | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
With the country also known as Burma taking steps toward democracy and respect for human rights, Coke is returning after a 60-year absence. What are the two nations where it still won't be doing business?

 

Globalization has made many companies and products ubiquitious throughout the world.  We take their presence as a matter of course, a sign that the largest brands are in essentially every country in the world--but not all.  Until recently Coca Cola was not in three markets, all for political reasons.  Now that Burma is becoming more democratic, Coca-Cola will bring their product to all countries of South East Asia.  Any guesses on the 2 countries that still don't have Coke?

 

UPDATED CORRECTION: Thanks to the great people at About.com 's geography page, I was informed that there are more than just the initially listed two countries (North Korea and Cuba) not within the Coke universe (such as Somalia and East Timor to name a few).  For more on this see: http://geography.about.com/b/2012/06/15/coca-cola-in-every-country-but-three-no.htm


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:42 PM

This was an interesting but short article.  It is interesting to realize that Coke is sold almost universally worldwide with just a few exceptions.  It is truly the poster boy for globalization.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:03 AM

Coke is another product that is a worldwide phenomenon. People love their soda (even if its terrible for you). People that migrate from country to country bring with them unique items such as Coke, that the foreigners don't know about. This is how different countries come to pick up on other countries foods and customs.

Cyrena & Chloe's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:43 PM

GEOGRAPHY: North Korea, although one of the smallest nations in the world, is still arguably the most defiant. They're completely cut-off from the outside world, and they've displayed this once again by not selling Coke in their borders. Being a classic American drink, Coca-Cola is likely viewed as an enemy to North Korea, judging by their hatred of America and its citizens. They're one of only two countries in the world not to sell Coke, and this just goes to show that even though they're physically connected to us, they are isolated from the world.

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US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005

US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005 | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005...

 

This interactive graph is not visually intuitive and easy to interpret, but it is a wealth of information about the United States geopolitical policies throughout time in addition to it's humanitarian aid throughout the developing world.  For example, you can see that the aid to Vietnam from 1965-1973 exploded, and to Israel from 1976-2002.  In 1947, the United Kingdom (under the Marshall Plan) accounted for over half of all of the international aid.   


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:05 PM

In this graph it shows the US foreign aid over time from 1946-2005. In this diagram it shows the difference in 1965-1973 from Vietnam sky rocketed and the same thing happened in '76-2002 in Israel.  But the Marshall plan once enacted helped the UK people and other nations.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 13, 2014 3:15 AM

Foreign Aid