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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts. 

 

Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.


Via Seth Dixon, LEONARDO WILD
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isitfinishedyet's curator insight, April 21, 8:00 AM

Great lesson in backgrounds

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 7:16 PM

Scales...

Coco Angus's curator insight, April 28, 5:56 PM

April 19 2015 

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America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall

America’s coal heartland is in economic freefall | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The coal economy in Central Appalachia is in an unprecedented freefall. Which isn't making it easier for workers to move on.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 5:58 PM

(North America post 3)
Built upon from class today, this article discusses the hardship many Appalachian families are feeling as the coal mining business continues to evolve and industrialize. Although coal was the major 'boom' behind many of these towns, the 'bust' hits more than just those laid off by the industry. Like a chain reaction, other families and their businesses suffer; less income leads to less eating out leads to less income for restaurants, and it goes on and on.  This article is also good at showing that geography is more than spatial and economic: on certain levels, it's also relational, personal, cultural, and historic, giving residents strong feelings behind their decisions to stay.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, September 23, 2014 10:44 AM

This video really shows the relationship between sense of place versus economic geography. Even though the town is no longer the rich mining town it once was, the remaining residents still cling to the past and their sense of identity remains strong. It demonstrates that cultural heritage is a powerful factor that can remain long after dramatic economic changes. Even though there are few opportunities left in the town and the majority of its young people leave for greener pastures, some residents still identify so strongly with the area that they are willing to do whatever they can to revitalize their town.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:42 AM

This is relevant to early posts about coalfields in West Virginia.

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How the “internet of things” will replace the web

How the “internet of things” will replace the web | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The second in a series. We've already written about why 2014 is really, finally the year that the "internet of things"—that effort to remotely control every object on earth—becomes visible in our everyday lives.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 9:40 AM

Future applications of the Internet that goes beyond our wildest imaginations.

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Who's using mobile maps and check-ins

Who's using mobile maps and check-ins | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
According to a new survey from the Pew Internet and American Life Project, three-quarters of U.S.

 

Smartphones have built-in location features with a host of apps that can be added.  However, 1  in 4 smartphone users do not use these features at all.  Age, ethnicity, education and gender (or more simply, demographic factors) play a major role.  Which groups would you imagine use geo-location features more or less?  Why? 


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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:30 PM

 I would imagine that the group that would use less geo-location features could be the older crowd, probably because they might not know to use it; for example my mother’ we recently bought her a new iPhone. she only know the basic call, text and taking picture , I been trying to get her to use her phone as a GPS but she won’t budge in. when I asked her how do she feel about  letting other people know where she is (check in Facebook) she thinks is crazy because she like her privacy.

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Giant Concrete Arrows Across America

Giant Concrete Arrows Across America | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Every so often, a hiker or a backpacker will run across something puzzling: a ginormous concrete arrow, as much as seventy feet in length, just sitting in the middle of scrub-covered America. What are these giant arrows? Jeopardy champ Ken Jennings solves the mystery.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 20, 2014 2:18 PM

This is fascinating...just because a technology is old and outdated in modern society doesn't mean it wasn't ingenious.  The original mathematicians who calculated angles and distances study geometry so they could navigate and 'measure the Earth.' Before GPS, these giant arrows helped pilots navigate across the United States; they are part of the genealogical strands of navigational technology.   Mathematics can be incredibly spatial as well as geospatial.   


Tagsmapping, GPS, math, geospatial, location, historical.

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:35 PM

Very intriguing!

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

 

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."


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MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:56 PM

APHG-U6

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:03 PM

For use in understanding the placement of businesses in Human Geography.

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 3:34 AM

A great video lesson that gets at the heart of location theory and competition.

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How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 1:17 PM

(Mexico topic 9)

It is troubling to discover how bribery still continues to promote special interests at the expense of others and their own interests. Though other articles I have commented on discuss the improving economy and politics of Mexico, this one clearly shows an area that needs much more attention.

   Despite this, all of the fuss (though justifiable) may be slightly over-exaggerated in my opinion. Just look at the photo above: the WalMart is at least somewhat set back from the pyramids, BUT the smoke and smog from other industries fills the air right up to and all around the pyramids themselves. I think this is just as much, if not more, of an injustice to the cultural site. While one can choose whether or not to enter a store, it is impossible not to breathe in the polluted air and have one's view limited while visiting such a place.

   Lastly, although bribery is certainly something I deeply frown upon, perhaps it is slightly less "wrong" than it would be in other countries like the US. Since Mexico's government and its departments have a reputation (at least from what I've heard) of being corrupted, perhaps the only way to build a store is to offer a bribe. It would be interesting to see if this was the case with other store locations throughout Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:50 PM

Clearly it is horrible what Walmart did, but what about everyone else in this scenario? Walmart was able to damage public history and jeopardize the traffic safety of Mexico because they figured out the going price for those concepts was: a couple mayors, some INAH official, and an Urban Operations official (see article for in-depth explanations of how each was bought off). All of whom bypassed their duty to the public. See I am not surprised by the corporation’s actions. The corporation is acting for its own self-interest like many corporations have historically done. In fact, compared to the East India Company of 1800 (which had its own standing army) this is tame (see below article). I would prefer companies not to operate as such, however a company will act in such a manner so long as it is permitted. Deterring such actions falls on the fault of the officials who were so easily bought off.

 

Yet, whose job is it to police a corporation? At one point, the article mentioned that when the Mexican investigation found nothing wrong with Walmart they, “chided protesters for failing to present any specific proof.” I’m sorry, but it isn’t the protesters job to go out and find proof. That is the job of an investigator, whom I might add didn’t do a good job given the evidence the New York Times was able to amass. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) for Mexico, they probably aren’t that apt at forensic banking because they are a largely agrarian society who only relatively recently is being introduced to the corporate world. Looks like there is a whole new specialty that Mexico will need to learn soon due to globalization. I say Mexico needs to learn this also because it is mainly their job to monitor their people. I understand that this is an American company so on some level they will have to monitor their people. However, majority of the people involved in this were in Mexico. Thus, Mexico will need to deal with their side of justice and also start developing environmentally usefully laws under the new corporate rule (i.e. ones that protect historical artifacts even when the “proper” licenses have been secured.)

 

I am not looking to just pick on Mexico’s corporation problems either because we all know the United States has their fair share of corporate issues. In fact, I think it is safe to say that Walmart could have bought off people in the United States too. Think of all the tainted deals that occurred in the subprime mortgage crisis. We aren’t even sure because no one actually went after them! At least in the case of Walmart there is an investigation going on again. It will be interesting to see what the end result is though. Most times, it isn’t near what a company should get. In the United States some are literally able to get away with murder. Just look at GM's latest court dealings. I hope Mexico can do a better job than the United States when it comes to handling corporate investigations in the future.  

 

* http://www.economist.com/node/21541753

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:32 PM

This article shows the "forced globalization" of Mexico.  I thought it was interesting how Walmart de Mexico would use such cutthroat means to build a "intermediate sized store".  Yet the Walmart officials in Mexico realized that being not too far from a major tourist attraction would help business.  There were many groups who tried to stop it from happening, but they could not stop the store from being built.  This article shows how corporate Globalization is ruthless, and it doesn't care about disobeying laws.  This article also shows that if a company is big enough, it can, in effect do whatever it pleases.  In the United States on the other hand, this type of bribery could never have happened. 

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Location always matters!

Location always matters! | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Even the three little pigs need to know the basic tenets of geography.


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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:57 AM

This image has a lot to do with geograpy because of where the pig placed his new home. Location is key when deciding where to place a building or home. If a new mall is being built they want to make sure they put it in a popular area where people are like in a city.  In this example the pig placed his home right next to  a sausage factory where this factory could use him to make sausage. He probably should have built his home in an area away from the factory like in a neighborhood.