INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:34 PM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Poverty rates by country

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 2015 4:31 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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Early men and women were equal, say scientists

Early men and women were equal, say scientists | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
There is still this wider perception that hunter-gatherers are more macho or male-dominated. We’d argue it was only with the emergence of agriculture, when people could start to accumulate resources, that inequality emerged.

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor.


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pdeppisch's comment, June 6, 2015 11:13 AM
That was my assumption that early hunter-gatherers societies were more equal.
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French scallops cleaned in China then sent back

French scallops cleaned in China then sent back | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Scallops pulled out of the waters off the western coast of France are taken on an incredible journey that sees them shipped off to China to be cleaned, before being sent all the way back to France to be cooked up. Producers say its worth the cost.

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Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 22, 2015 6:50 PM

this is crazy

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:03 PM

This makes absolutely no sense to me.  How does the freshness of the scallop even last a trip like this?  What is the transportation time back and forth? 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:40 PM

This type of nonsense only makes sense in a world where the bottom dollar is the only way to way to evaluate decisions.  However, resource conservation (think of the food miles!), fair labor prices, and the preservation of local cultural economies are certainly issues that should be considered. 

 

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

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Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers

Deported Mexicans find new life at call centers | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Henry Monterroso is a foreigner in his own country. Raised in California from the age of 5, he was deported to Mexico in 2011 and found himself in a land he barely knew. But the 34-year-old now supervises five employees amid rows of small cubicles who spend eight hours a day dialing numbers across the United States. He is among thousands of deported Mexicans who are finding refuge in call centers in Tijuana and other border cities. In perfect English — some hardly speak Spanish — they converse with American consumers who buy gadgets, have questions about warrantees or complain about overdue deliveries."


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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:45 PM

When it comes to deportation, its usually a loss win situation. But in the case of Mexicans who once lived a life on US soil from since birth and having been deported later on in life, adjusting to a new life in a new world is challenging. The comfort of being able to work in an environment that reminds them of being back home eliviates the agony of being separated from their family back in the US. The outsourced phone companies give these deported individual an opportunity to be able to participate in a life they once lived by being able to interact with Americans. While they make subsequently less than what they were making in the states, the opportunity of being able to work in a foreign land is one that they are forever grateful for.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:49 PM

This article is similar to the topic of outsourcing jobs to the United states, only it is the reverse, with deportees being giving jobs at call centers in the city of Tijuana. It brings up the topic of culture shock and the differences between Mexican and United States Economies.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:33 PM

Brings to mind the whole debate over over illegals vs. legals, work visas and work permits, political change and citizenship. So many factors are present in the decisions these Mexican born, living in America, deported back to their home country, must make. How culturally shocking it must be to be living the American Dream in an area that is bi-lingual, San Diego, and be deported back to Tijuana, making $150 a week.

It's a blessing and a curse for both sides of the border. The USA loses tax revenue from the money Henry was bringing in while working in real estate, conversely Mexico gains a smaller slice of the tax given his drop in pay. He clearly was happy and productive here, but others such as the gang member mentioned, may make the USA happier by taking his gang affiliation with him. Not good for Mexico, but perhaps he can make a fresh start in that country.

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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Labor Day 2012

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights.  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.


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Production in the New Global Economy

Production in the New Global Economy | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Executives have long said America can’t compete in building electronic devices. But the migration of carmaking from Japan is a case study in the most unlikely of transformations.

 

"The iEconomy: Nissan’s Move to U.S. Offers Lessons for Tech Industry."  This is an excellent article on how the car and tech industries are changing the global economy.  Numerous foreign car companies are now investing in US; so is a Nissan produced in Tennessee a foreign car or a domestic?  The global economy is blurring many of the traditional ways in which we view production   and affecting the United States in particular. The interactive feature linked to the article provides some excellent data and resources.   This would be a great background to prepare students before taking a sample test AP Human Geography test (like Question #3 from 2011).


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Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class.

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:47 PM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:33 PM

Its a very sad situation reading this. Seeing people go through all this to just survive. Kids don't even get any education and follow their parents footsteps to work at a plant just to be able to pay for bills. 8 dollars a day, and you wonder why they try to run to united states. Its very unfortunate that a lot of people go through this and i hope it changes soon, because to see that this is going on makes me thankful for what i have around me. Foreign investors are not great as they set out to be take advantage of the poor and get rich out of it, i think its pretty ridiculous.

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Dept. of Labor's Geospatial Data

Dept. of Labor's Geospatial Data | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

The United States Dept. of Labor has great tools for analyzing economic and industrial data for the U.S.A.  County level data is also available.  Personal favorite: you can analyze the economic viables based on industry (perfect for teaching about the various sectors of the economy). 


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Rolling tobacco for a living

Rolling tobacco for a living | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Sagira Ansari is among the thousands of children working in hazardous industries that are crucial to the Indian economy.

This gallery of 9 images with captions is an excellent lens for showing life in South Asia and child labor issues. 


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 1:46 PM

This article depicts the child labor that takes place in the South Asian territories and land among it. THe child labor is ruthless and truly long lasting and damaging to the children who ahve to endure it. For example,  Sangira Ansari has to roll tabaccoo for a liviing in order to survive and has to help by doing this because without these workers there would be no resources that are crucial to the economy and the govermential trade routes.

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Desperately seeking Americans for factory jobs

Desperately seeking Americans for factory jobs | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As U.S. factories enjoy a pickup in business, and need to hire more people, many are facing a perplexing situation --a dearth of skilled manufacturing workers in America.

 

Even in a time when so many are lamenting the lack of factory jobs available to American workers because of the outsourcing of manufacturing, factories can't find the qualified machinists and other critical skilled positions to operate a factory at capacity. 


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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 9:38 AM
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?

 

Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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America’s national vacation problem

America’s national vacation problem | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"As Americans enjoy an extra day away from the office over the long Labor Day weekend, many will reflect on the end of a summer when, once again, they took far fewer days of vacation than workers in other countries. 40% of Americans do not take all of their vacation days."


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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, September 10, 2015 9:35 PM

Americans have been said to be the least vacationing people compared to many other countries workers. But, according to the article, 40% choose to do this, and do not take off as many vacation days as they can. Many Americans would like to, but feel pressured to keep up with the American stereotype and keep being 'hard-working' citizens. BBC did a poll on their Facebook page to find this out, and many Americans said that their bosses as well do not make it easy to take time off sometimes, restricting their vacationing days, although at a federal level, they should be able to do so easily. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:07 PM

It is amazing to look at American society and their struggles with taking days out of work on vacation. In this competitive economy, people need to be hard working to keep their jobs and excel in their field of work. Taking days off usually would be wise in order to refresh and rejuvenate from the long working hours. However, people are fearing that their work load will be too overwhelming to take on upon their return if they chose to take time off. One of my managers at work (JCPenney) would stay passed her scheduled time to make sure the men's department would be clean and organized before she leave. She usually does this after she clocked out and will stay for 3-4 hours after. I can definitely relate this situation to the article. The fact that most Americans working at a job that they have tons of responsibilities for will feel stressed and overwhelmed if they take vacation days. 

Tracy Harding's comment, September 22, 2015 10:15 AM
You need to include global impact and personal thoughts.
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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon, Kevin Barker
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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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Why more Mexicans are staying home

Tiny Tamaula is the new face of rural Mexico: Villagers are home again as the illegal immigration boom drops to net zero. Full story on CSMonitor.com: http:/...

 

Contrary to popular opinion, illegal immigration from Mexico to the United States is not really a problem in 2012.  As conditions on both sides of the border have changed, this gives a glimpse into the life choices of Mexican villagers.  For more on this issue see the complete article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/2012/0408/Home-again-in-Mexico-Illegal-immigration-hits-net-zero ;


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 11:55 AM

I enjoy stories like this, because it demonstrates people willing to fight for their home. Many interesting ideas lie behind stories such as this one, but what I find especially intriguing is the dynamics of money in relation to these small rural villages. Money and "income" drives our current economic positions, but there are some places which were left behind and have none of the jobs we in the first world would traditionally think of. They had to either subside off their own products through farming, or trade their livelyhood for a small amount of money. Put simply, money is necessary for a so called "modern" existence, but not necessary for survival. These villagers are working for their own future in their home country now though, while it may not be necessarily profitable in the short term, it will pay off for their children in the long term.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:29 AM

(Mexico topic 1)
"Things are not good in the United States. There is not a lot of work and Mexicans like to keep busy." I was surprised by this this comment which sums up one of the main reasons why many Mexican immigrants are returning to Mexico. This implies that as the American economy has worsened, Mexico's must be improving (at least by comparison). This completely supports the concept of Mexico evolving into a "semi-core" country.
   Additionally, I hope this quote will help to shed some truth onto the negative lazy stereotype many Americans associate with immigrating Mexicans.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:39 PM

With a little help from the video, it is clear now, to understand why many Mexican folks are actually not leaving their country for the US. It said in the video that there is not a lot of work in the US and Mexicans like to keep busy. Also, a lot of Mexicans are finding opportunity right in their own country where there once was no opportunity. Electricity reaches the house, they have paved roads and updated pipes. They will need to rely on us for fuel. It is also nice for them to know that they do not need to leave their families behind in Mexico while they go to the US, they can have the satisfaction of working in local fields and seeing family when they get home at the end of the day.