INTRODUCTION TO T...
Follow
Find tag "housing"
1.0K views | +1 today
INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Esaili's Geography
Scoop.it!

Spatial Design

"How much does size really matter? Judging by this tiny home in France, not a whole lot -- as long as the space is functional.

On the seventh floor of an apartment building in Paris, there's an 86-square-foot apartment complete with a bed, kitchen, bathroom, table and chairs, closet, bathroom and storage space." --HPost


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 7:26 PM

Space in a home matters, but the functionality of that space is critical.  Geography is about spatial thinking, and this video promotes a different type of spatial thinking, but one that still will help geographic thought.  As our metropolitan areas get more and more crowded, planning of this type might become increasingly common.  What advantages to you see in interior design that seek s to maximize space?  What are some drawbacks to a design such as this?


Tags: spatialdensity, urbanism, housing.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, November 23, 10:16 PM

With an ever-growing urban population spatial design is important in maintaining functionality, efficiency and orderliness. The apartment building in Paris is especially interesting. It is practical and functions well enough to where a person can live comfortably in a markedly small but efficient space.   

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Wekiva AP Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."

 

Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.

 

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 


Via Seth Dixon, Kara Charboneau
more...
Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Underwater Homes

The Geography of Underwater Homes | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
New data from Zillow shows fewer homeowners underwater, but the pattern varies widely by geography.

 

The Sunbelt (especially California and Florida) have the highest percentage of homeowners that are 'underwater' and owe more than the home is worth.  Also hit hard are declining metro areas area of the rust belt. 

Question to ponder: Why would these places be hit the hardest?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Esaili's Geography
Scoop.it!

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


Via Seth Dixon, Jodi Esaili
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:14 PM

APHG-U2

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Chicago’s Housing Crisis Ignited a New Form of Activism

How Chicago’s Housing Crisis Ignited a New Form of Activism | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
An innovative campaign to move “home-less people into people-less homes.”

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 1, 2013 6:52 AM

Chicago's poorer neighborhoods have experienced a severe decline as homes are being foreclosed at an alarming rate (62,000 vacant properties in Chicago and 40% of the homes underwater on the South and West Sides).  When sections of a neighborhood are left vacant or in disrepair, it can have a lead to negative impacts on the community.  To combat both the homelessness issue and the vacant home problem at the same time, "Cook County now plans to form what will become the nation’s largest land bank, an entity that will acquire thousands of vacant residences, demolishing some, turning others into much-needed rentals and holding onto others until they can be released, strategically, back into the market."   


Tags: Chicagohousing, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
coisa mais linda :)
Rescooped by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cities where homebuying is most (and least) affordable

Cities where homebuying is most (and least) affordable | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Looking for an affordable home? Here are 5 cities that are good bets, and 5 cities where owning is tough.

 

This is an intriguing set of lists.  What geographic factors explain why some cities are on either of these lists?  In related news on housing in the United States, many of the so-called "McMansions" of the 1990s and 2000s were virtually unsellable during height of the recession.  They are now being sold, but for around half of what they were selling for at their peak.  For more on McMansions, see this CNN article.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.