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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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The shocking differences in basic body language around the world

The shocking differences in basic body language around the world | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
The body speaks volumes. But what it says depends on the culture you're in.

 

Tags: culture, infographic, worldwide.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 25, 12:17 PM

unit 3

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:14 PM

People say that actions speak louder than words. However, as far as body language is concerned, actions can possess different meanings in other parts of the world. As a result, some things are better expressed through annunciation than action. It is interesting to consider the many ways body language is interpreted in different countries.  For example, for business purposes, people need to be well versed in the culture of the country and their current business practices. Otherwise, there could be harmful consequences in regards to the economy. In some countries, body language means different things in different regions. This is why it is important for people to be conscious about the culture and appropriate etiquette in different countries.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, March 31, 6:43 AM

Thanks, non verbal comunication is always interesting.

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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.

 

Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:50 PM

As opportunities are continually found in big cities, so too are young people migrating to these prosperous cities. Culture in the youth population has been restructured with new ideas, open mindedness, freedom, and also how the city offers many comforts. They plan out their future in the city because it has so many amenities, with amazing transportation in between other areas. Expectations are raised because young people consider things in different perspectives. New urban developments such as old manufacturing buildings being converted into housing apartments offer the youth suitable living arrangements and accommodations. However, mature populations keep being displaced to the suburban areas, due to different expectations. Older people prefer more relaxation in their lives and they are not very interested in the most advanced technologies. As young people keep moving to the big cities, these highly populated areas have to structure new patterns to develop urban sections.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 12:09 PM

This city talks about which cities in the United States have the largest amounts of young and old residents. This is important because those cities with large amounts of young people (like Austin) are likely to be on the cutting edge of innovation and it is those cities that we can look to to show the rest of the nation the future of urban design. I believe that this article is very interesting and provides a good insight into which parts of the country are advancing quickly and which parts are sating rooted in the past.

 

-Charles Bradbury

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10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt

10 American English Words and Phrases British Expats Eventually Adopt | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
As a British expat who has lived and worked in the U.S. for over five years, I remain very much in favor of embracing the various wonderful nuances this country has to offer. However, there was one aspect of my move that—during the initial settling-in period—I secretly feared: the gradual Americanization of my vocabulary.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 8, 4:21 PM

While this list was created for English speakers in the UK, I will invert the list to show some terms that Americans rarely use, even if we understand their meaning: rubbish, mobile, motorway, petrol, car park, you lot, maths, pavement, football and fizzy drink.  If this interests you so will this list of 10 British insults that American don't understand


Tags: language, culture, English, UK.

tentuseful's comment, January 17, 4:16 AM
Thats stunning
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:07 PM

unit 3

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Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus

Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
A look into Smithsonian's vast archives reveals that Father Christmas tends to get a makeover with every generation that embraces him

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 12, 2014 12:03 PM

The picture archives show the historical evolution behind the cultural representations of Santa Claus.  Additionally this ESRI story map shows some of the regional differences in Santa Claus, showing how the cultural diffusion of this icon of a Christian holiday takes on real local attributes.  I also enjoyed these pictures from the BBC of Christmas around the world.  Merry Christmas to those that celebrate it and a Happy New Year to all.

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes

7 of the Best Dialect Quizzes | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
If you're feeling particularly nationalistic, or just want to see how consistently you speak like your friends and neighbors, here are all the dialect quizzes that I could find. Find out what your dialect most resembles, and, in many cases, help science at the same time!

 

Tags: language, culture, English.


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Julia Kang's curator insight, November 6, 2014 8:42 PM

Enligsh dialects looks interesting! If I have a chance later, I want to know more about it :)

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 12, 2014 11:07 AM

Take a few of these quizzes and be ready to share your reaction to your results!

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Currywurst on the Street

Currywurst on the Street | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Michael Slackman, The Times's Berlin Bureau Chief, looks into the city's obsession with a popular street dish that combines sausage, ketchup and curry powder.

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:44 AM

This is a stride of different cultures,  a little ancient and modern culture. When the Turkish immigrant came over to Germany because they needed workers (Germans stopped having so many kids) it help form the curry wurst. They also use American ketchup because Americans were over there for the war and they ate this too. The curry powder came way of United Kingdom. Basically the population learned from all these cultures and  created one huge hit. 

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, October 26, 2014 11:23 AM

Unit 3

How are these 5 major elements of culture seen in this video?

1. Culture traits

2. Diffusion patters

3.Acculturation, assimilation, and multiculturalism

4. Culture region, vernacular region, cultural hearth

5. Globalization and the effects of technology on culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:26 PM

unit 3

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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7”;


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 19, 8:03 PM

This idea that women do not have human rights takes place in Saudi Arabia. What this poster is saying is that women are sweet creatures metaphorically just like candy. As you can see on the right, the candy is wrapped and covered just like the woman covered in a hijab and on the left, the candy is unwrapped and it shows the exposure of the woman and her features. Saudi Arabia has a strict rule about women being covered up and not exposing themselves to the outside world just like the image on the right.

David Lizotte's curator insight, March 25, 8:19 PM

This poster/advertisement raises many questions. Having discussed it in detail during class it left me with a few questions and comments. One is whom created this poster? Two, where was this poster advertised? Three, its an extremely original piece of propaganda which passes judgement on woman and the way they are to live. Four, as discussed in class, the color green is a dominant "true" Islamic color. But what's also interesting is that the preferred character of women is on the east side of the poster while the scandalous-less preferred- woman is on the west side. Western influence in a middle eastern Islamic region is not quite received with open arms... Its almost saying Arab women should stay true to Islam and cover themselves. Women whom are influenced by western culture have lost there way and are damaged goods that no true man of Islam would want to pursue. 

This piece of propaganda has many layers to it. Although I personally am not too keen on the message it is an interesting and creative "piece" to say the least. Its too bad it is used to label and even dehumanize women.  

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 4:37 PM

Im sure this poster was highly offensive to many people in the middle east, both male and female.  There is a lot of meaning in each picture, but the basic point seems to be that the image on the right is the way that a lady is supposed to dress, the way that is more appropriate.  Conservative with the candy wrapped, it shows that a woman should dress and act a certain way, while the other image has a girl, who appears to be naked with her hair blowing around, who looks like she has no values, or respect for her religion.

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17 Fun Facts About Seinfeld

17 Fun Facts About Seinfeld | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Whether you like it or not, NBC's Seinfeld is still heralded by many as one of television's best shows to date. There's the occasional fun fact about the show that most people know, such as how there's a Superman reference in every episode, but there are various other fun facts of which someone people may be unaware, which is what the detailed infographic after the jump is for.

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77 Facts That Sound Like Huge Lies But Are Actually Completely True

77 Facts That Sound Like Huge Lies But Are Actually Completely True | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

ctGet ready to have your mind blown into a different time zone.


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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 13, 11:29 AM

I absolutely love this! Here is a country that takes a lot of pride in eating fresh foods. They do not have any fast food chains because Bolivians prefer their traditional foods just the way they are. They still eat hamburgers but prefer to buy them from women who make them instead of a McDonald's. Bolivians value that interaction and relationship with the people surrounding them and that genuinely makes food more enjoyable. Their food relationships do not involve money but the effects of what these fresh foods can do for them. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 1:17 PM

(Mexico topic 9)

It is troubling to discover how bribery still continues to promote special interests at the expense of others and their own interests. Though other articles I have commented on discuss the improving economy and politics of Mexico, this one clearly shows an area that needs much more attention.

   Despite this, all of the fuss (though justifiable) may be slightly over-exaggerated in my opinion. Just look at the photo above: the WalMart is at least somewhat set back from the pyramids, BUT the smoke and smog from other industries fills the air right up to and all around the pyramids themselves. I think this is just as much, if not more, of an injustice to the cultural site. While one can choose whether or not to enter a store, it is impossible not to breathe in the polluted air and have one's view limited while visiting such a place.

   Lastly, although bribery is certainly something I deeply frown upon, perhaps it is slightly less "wrong" than it would be in other countries like the US. Since Mexico's government and its departments have a reputation (at least from what I've heard) of being corrupted, perhaps the only way to build a store is to offer a bribe. It would be interesting to see if this was the case with other store locations throughout Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:50 PM

Clearly it is horrible what Walmart did, but what about everyone else in this scenario? Walmart was able to damage public history and jeopardize the traffic safety of Mexico because they figured out the going price for those concepts was: a couple mayors, some INAH official, and an Urban Operations official (see article for in-depth explanations of how each was bought off). All of whom bypassed their duty to the public. See I am not surprised by the corporation’s actions. The corporation is acting for its own self-interest like many corporations have historically done. In fact, compared to the East India Company of 1800 (which had its own standing army) this is tame (see below article). I would prefer companies not to operate as such, however a company will act in such a manner so long as it is permitted. Deterring such actions falls on the fault of the officials who were so easily bought off.

 

Yet, whose job is it to police a corporation? At one point, the article mentioned that when the Mexican investigation found nothing wrong with Walmart they, “chided protesters for failing to present any specific proof.” I’m sorry, but it isn’t the protesters job to go out and find proof. That is the job of an investigator, whom I might add didn’t do a good job given the evidence the New York Times was able to amass. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) for Mexico, they probably aren’t that apt at forensic banking because they are a largely agrarian society who only relatively recently is being introduced to the corporate world. Looks like there is a whole new specialty that Mexico will need to learn soon due to globalization. I say Mexico needs to learn this also because it is mainly their job to monitor their people. I understand that this is an American company so on some level they will have to monitor their people. However, majority of the people involved in this were in Mexico. Thus, Mexico will need to deal with their side of justice and also start developing environmentally usefully laws under the new corporate rule (i.e. ones that protect historical artifacts even when the “proper” licenses have been secured.)

 

I am not looking to just pick on Mexico’s corporation problems either because we all know the United States has their fair share of corporate issues. In fact, I think it is safe to say that Walmart could have bought off people in the United States too. Think of all the tainted deals that occurred in the subprime mortgage crisis. We aren’t even sure because no one actually went after them! At least in the case of Walmart there is an investigation going on again. It will be interesting to see what the end result is though. Most times, it isn’t near what a company should get. In the United States some are literally able to get away with murder. Just look at GM's latest court dealings. I hope Mexico can do a better job than the United States when it comes to handling corporate investigations in the future.  

 

* http://www.economist.com/node/21541753

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:32 PM

This article shows the "forced globalization" of Mexico.  I thought it was interesting how Walmart de Mexico would use such cutthroat means to build a "intermediate sized store".  Yet the Walmart officials in Mexico realized that being not too far from a major tourist attraction would help business.  There were many groups who tried to stop it from happening, but they could not stop the store from being built.  This article shows how corporate Globalization is ruthless, and it doesn't care about disobeying laws.  This article also shows that if a company is big enough, it can, in effect do whatever it pleases.  In the United States on the other hand, this type of bribery could never have happened. 

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2:43 AM

Ethnicity is a man made classification of humans. We are all from the same earth correct? we are all made and born the same way correct? But for some strange reason we felt the need to divide ourselves and make pretend hate and hierarchy between people. This article proves just how weak the titles we put on ourselves are. Twins Lucy and Maria Aylmer were born but to everyone's surprise, one was "black" and one was "white". Does this make them biracial? can they flip flop what they wasn't to be? My personal ties to this article are surprising. I often feel like I am not the ethnicity I am labeled as. Both of my parents are "white" but I am always asked if I am "black" on top of that I have learned that I accept black culture and tastes more then white style. Does this make me a poser? or am I simply the victim of this false labeling we humans do. This article made it clear and fun to explore the ideas of ethnicity in a new light.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 12:57 PM

Cultural differences in attitudes toward gender-

This article explains how to twins do not care about each other's color, but how they are friends and help one another. They are both supportive to one another, and wish the best for eachother.

 

This portrays the idea of cultural differences in attitudes toward gender because both of them do not care what color they are and what gender, therefore, they have identical attitudes toward gender.

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:45 PM

This article relating to Unit 3 (culture) headlines a story about twins of different races. In the blog it argues two cases; one being that this proves how far-fetched racial categorization is and the other being that they categorize themselves as black or white

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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 9:03 AM

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 2014 4:37 PM

APHG-U3

Sarah Mahoney's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:14 PM

Great example of cultural diversity

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Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong

Would You Guess There Are Fewer Amish Today? You'd Be So Wrong | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"There’s no denying that the Amish are fascinating to the rest of us ("the English," in Amish terms).  We buy their furniture and jam, and may occasionally spot their buggies when driving on country roads through America’s heartland.  Many may not realize, however, that though the Amish make up only a tiny percentage of Americans (less than 0.1 percent), the Amish population has grown enormously since the early 1960s, with much of the increase occurring in the last two decades." 

 

Tags:  population, USA, folk cultures, culture, religion. 


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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 5:05 PM

I am surprised that there is an increase in the Amish population.  I find the reality shows about the Amish poor viewing.  Especially that goofy show Amish Mafia.  That is the worst show ever.  Why has there been an increase in the last two decades?  Are they worried about their population?  Is it an unstated rule in their society to produce X amount of offspring?  How long can they continue to keep the outside world out or at a distance?  

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 8:14 PM

I've been to "Amish Country" in Pennsylvania a couple times, most recently in 2011 on a band trip in high school. We got to tour an Amish farm house that was moved and recreated in a more modern area, specifically right next to a Target (The entrance was in the parking lot of the Target, something I couldn't help but laugh about.) I found it very interesting to learn about their culture and why they do things a certain way. I asked one of the docents if they get many converts and she said they don't but she has heard of a couple of cases. 

After that response, I was kind of surprised to read this article and find out that their community is growing, especially at such exponential rates. The family size theory though is very believable. For a community that uses farming and crafts as their main source of income, a large number of hands would be needed to help sustain the family. 

Chris Plummer's curator insight, February 15, 12:41 PM

Summary- According to this graph, it is evident that many more Amish are here today than ever before. Even though this map only displays settlements(484), more than 1 person can be living in a settlement meaning there is a lot more Amish than you would think. amish make up less then 0.1 percent of our population just showing how many people actually live in America.

 

Insight- The amish religion is growing exponentially, especially in the last two decades. (1964 - 2014). Being a folk culture, they are relativly large. They amish do not exploit their religion because of this reason as well, but with they growing population many people are taking notice of them. 

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Conflict Kitchen serves up controversy

Conflict Kitchen serves up controversy | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Conflict Kitchen is an art project based in the centre of Pittsburgh which serves food from countries with which the US is 'in conflict'.  The founders get to define what conflict means - it can range from outright war to economic sanctions - and since opening in 2010 they have prepared food from Afghanistan, Iran, North Korea, Venezuela and Cuba.  But the restaurant's latest choice of cuisine, Palestinian food, has caused controversy in the city and even led to a death threat which temporarily closed the venue.  Critics pointed out that the US is not in conflict with the Palestinian people. They claimed that the pamphlets served with the dishes included 'anti-Israel' propaganda. But Conflict Kitchen's founders said the project was designed to encourage debate among Americans."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 5, 2014 5:20 PM

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the purpose of Conflict Kitchen is for the restaurant owners?  Many people choose restaurants for a cultural experience; what type of cultural experiences are these patrons searching for by eating at Conflict Kitchen?  What political overtones are there to these cultural encounters?  Is this a form of 'gastro-diplomacy?' 


Tags: foodpolitical, culture.

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How cultures around the world make decisions

How cultures around the world make decisions | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Is the American obsession with individual freedom really such a great idea? What other cultures know about how to make good choices.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 6, 2014 1:16 PM

This article show three distinct cultural approaches to the concept of choice, showing how they shape people and communities and cultural systems.  The three models discussed are:

  • One American model: Give me personal autonomy or give me death.
  • The Amish model: Belonging, not choice, is crucial.
  • One Asian model: Focus on interdependence and harmony, not independence and self-expression.

This TED talk from Malcolm Gladwell is also an interesting exploration into the world of choice and options.


Tagsculture, worldwideTED.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:31 PM

Decision tilmes, more or less

Scott Langston's curator insight, November 16, 2014 6:26 PM

Culture's influence on decision-making

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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:59 AM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 1:34 AM

I think this article could also fit into the view of culture of gender. The fact that there are separate celebrations in Jewish culture represent the divide between men and women. The Satere-Mawe tradition of wearing bullet ant gloves in order for boys to demonstrate their "manliness" is actually quite sexist. It demonstrates how men must behave in "manly" ways and not cry in order to be viewed as a "true" man. This creates a mentality in boys from a very young age that they must not be "feminine," and that they must be more headstrong than girls to be viewed as a man. The same goes for the Vanuatu tradition. Young boys have to go to the extreme (jump from tall towers with a simply a rope around their legs to keep them from dying) to prove their manhood. Of course these traditions are an important part of their culture, and I have no right to criticize, but I am simply providing an alternative analysis of these traditions.

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New Zealand's Wild Haka

ESPN Video: In the USA-New Zealand FIBA matchup, the USA players are very confused by New Zealand's pregame Haka.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 3, 2014 9:03 AM

I've enjoyed the Haka, a ritualized war dance that the New Zealand teams often perform just before a match (and can't we argue that sports a form of ritualized warfare?).  The clash of cultural contexts is  of New Zealand and Team USA is what makes this video work for me. 

MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 2014 4:37 PM

APHG-U3

Sarah Mahoney's curator insight, October 9, 2014 8:14 PM

Great example of cultural diversity

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Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts

Retronyms: Linguistic Shifts | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

A 'retronym' is a term specifying the original meaning of word after a newer meaning has overtaken it.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 3, 2014 9:06 AM

unit 3

God Is.'s curator insight, May 3, 2014 1:15 PM

Some of you might appreciate this article.. Darn I feel old! LOL

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:32 PM

Fantastic images for our modern day terms.

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 2014 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 2014 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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12 Predictions Isaac Asimov Made About 2014 in 1964

12 Predictions Isaac Asimov Made About 2014 in 1964 | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
After Isaac Asimov attended the World's Fair in 1964, he penned an essay he titled "Visit to the World's Fair of 2014."

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How the languages we speak affects the way we think

What can economists learn from linguists?

Tags: language, culture, economic, TED.


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Anne-Lous van den Ende's curator insight, May 7, 2013 11:18 AM

Intersting video on how the different languages we speak could affect our way of thinking.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:39 PM

I have never thought of this. I didn't even realise how different languages and cultures can be and how the tiny things effect the entire language.This demostrates why some languages are beter than others in their own way. 

Ms. Brin's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:12 AM

Very interesting!

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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:18 PM

This falls under the category of diffusion because it shows how western pop culture has diffused into the local Arab culture and meshed with it. By meshing, she means that the cultures mix together to form a somewhat new culture including the two.