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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization

Here's Every Meteorite Fall on Earth in a Single Interactive Visualization | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how many meteors have hit Earth? The Meteoritical Society is doing its best to keep track. And Javier de la Torre, co-founder of CartoDB, is helping us see the pure volume of hits (into the tens of thousands). His interactive visualization shows a heatmap of hits all over the world, letting you explore where and when meteorites fell, as well as their size and classification.


Via Lauren Moss, Suvi Salo
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Laura Brown's curator insight, May 25, 4:14 PM

I wonder how much of this is biased by the lack of reporting (or over reporting) in some areas. 

AnalyticsInnovations's curator insight, June 5, 7:09 AM

Example of data scientist faux pas:  Meteors choose to fall so unevenly...!

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon, Clairelouise
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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:42 PM

According to the map, in 1990, manufacturing had the highest employment rates. By the early 2000's, it appears that retail trade has then taken the top spot for employment rates. Finally in 2013, most of the US is covering in orange, which represents employment in the health care and social assistance work field. When I opened the article, all these facts were written above the map. However, I did not even notice the written facts because I was too busy playing with the map. This article tells us the facts but does not really elaborate on why things have changed. For one thing, I think  the manufacturing job market decreased because once the products were being made to be sold, retail took it from there. Of course manufacturers were still needed to supply items, but then retail takes it over. Health care and social assistance services were both in the top by 2013. This is probably because more people who were certified in medical fields were needed. Thus they were hired, which lead this job market to the top.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

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How to Make a Human Arabesque

This film and photographic experiment set out to prove The Power of X by attempting an Ideas Worth Doing for TEDxSUMMIT. The project fused architecture, danc...

 

This is a great demonstration of spatial thinking extending far beyond 'just' the discipline of geography.  Using spatial thinking, we can create truly breath-taking works of art.  To see more about this on the TED-ED site, see: http://ed.ted.com/on/AOxez5KX  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:38 PM

 

This is a great demonstration of spatial thinking extending far beyond 'just' the discipline of geography.  Using spatial thinking, we can create truly breath-taking works of art.  Read more about this on the TED-ED site.

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

Via Seth Dixon, Kevin Barker
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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:42 PM

According to the map, in 1990, manufacturing had the highest employment rates. By the early 2000's, it appears that retail trade has then taken the top spot for employment rates. Finally in 2013, most of the US is covering in orange, which represents employment in the health care and social assistance work field. When I opened the article, all these facts were written above the map. However, I did not even notice the written facts because I was too busy playing with the map. This article tells us the facts but does not really elaborate on why things have changed. For one thing, I think  the manufacturing job market decreased because once the products were being made to be sold, retail took it from there. Of course manufacturers were still needed to supply items, but then retail takes it over. Health care and social assistance services were both in the top by 2013. This is probably because more people who were certified in medical fields were needed. Thus they were hired, which lead this job market to the top.

Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

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Why games are good for learning?

Why games are good for learning? | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Aki Puustinen
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Francesco G. Lamacchia's curator insight, November 21, 2013 11:48 AM

Giocando....s'impara! 

Julio Cirnes's curator insight, November 25, 2013 3:46 PM

Please teacher, more games!

Ryan McDonough's curator insight, July 7, 2014 8:19 AM

Self explanatory visual on the benefits of gaming as a means of learning. Outlined are the rewards, mastery, engagement, intensity, exercise, readiness, and competitiveness. These types of graphics need to be displayed in the classroom. There's always parents who are unsure of how gaming qualifies as teaching. Can't they just sit their kid in front of an iPad all day at home? Well, in the appropriate setting, with the right direction and guidance, games are certainly good for learning. Some people just don't know that from experience yet.