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INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO
“In the business world, the rearview mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” Warren Buffet
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Spatial Design

"How much does size really matter? Judging by this tiny home in France, not a whole lot -- as long as the space is functional.

On the seventh floor of an apartment building in Paris, there's an 86-square-foot apartment complete with a bed, kitchen, bathroom, table and chairs, closet, bathroom and storage space." --HPost


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 7:26 PM

Space in a home matters, but the functionality of that space is critical.  Geography is about spatial thinking, and this video promotes a different type of spatial thinking, but one that still will help geographic thought.  As our metropolitan areas get more and more crowded, planning of this type might become increasingly common.  What advantages to you see in interior design that seek s to maximize space?  What are some drawbacks to a design such as this?


Tags: spatialdensity, urbanism, housing.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, November 23, 2014 10:16 PM

With an ever-growing urban population spatial design is important in maintaining functionality, efficiency and orderliness. The apartment building in Paris is especially interesting. It is practical and functions well enough to where a person can live comfortably in a markedly small but efficient space.   

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Urbanology

Urbanology | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

"What would your future city look like? Find out now by playing Urbanology online.  Urbanology is a game that examines the complex ways in which cities develop."  This is a great teaching tool since you are asked 10 questions that city planners need to answer that will shape the cultural and economic patterns of the city.  For example, would you remove an automobile lane to put in a bike lane or expand the sidewalk?   Based on your answers, it will tell you what city is most similar to the one you envision and what is your highest (and lowest) priority in laying out the city.  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 29, 2012 5:23 PM
It seems Berlin is the ideal city for me since I have a high priority for innovation. How does a specialized city affect it longevity? Is it difficult to redesign, thus serving as a deterrent to innovation? Once you specialize, design and develop it for a certain purpose don’t you also make it venerable to change? (I’m thinking about Detroit)
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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 2013 10:25 PM

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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Downtowns: How Did We Get Here?

Kennedy Smith is considered one of the nation's leading experts on downtowns, downtown economics, independent business development and the economic impact of urban sprawl, with a long career in downtown revitalization.

 

This video discusses the decline of the American Central Business District, the rise of shopping malls, the importance of the automobile and spatial organization of particular economic sectors.

 

Parts Two  http://vimeo.com/37041011 ; and Three  http://vimeo.com/37050944 ; continue the discussion with an emphasis on practical urban planning policies for small cities to revitalize the downtown region with some domestic and foreign examples. 


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:38 AM

I have wondered about that where these downtowns came from. I have thought of it because I am very curious to learn about downtown providence and how it became a downtown. Where did the word downtown come from? It is amazing how things are being called in this world.

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Top 5 smart growth projects in the U.S.

Top 5 smart growth projects in the U.S. | INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES DIGITAL TEXTBOOK(PSYCHOLOGY-ECONOMICS-SOCIOLOGY):MIKE BUSARELLO | Scoop.it
Where can you find the most innovative smart growth projects in America?

They’re in places like New Mexico and South Dakota, and they’re transforming their communities.

For the tenth year, the Environmental Protection Agency’s Smart Growth Achievement Awards has highlighted the most innovative approaches that communities are using to “strengthen their economies, provide housing and transportation choices, develop in ways that bring benefits to a wide range of residents, and protect the environment.”

Here’s EPA’s choices this year for the top 5 smart growth projects in the U.S. (in no particular order).  How is the Smart Growth movement changing urbanism in the United States? 


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